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Author Topic: Grammar quirks  (Read 140545 times)

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Mental Magpie

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #450 on: October 28, 2012, 09:41:44 AM »
starry diadem, I have heard "cliche" instead of "cliched", but I think what happens with "prejudiced" is that people just don't pronounce the hard "d" at the end.  A good example of what I mean is with how people pronounce ghosts, desks, and the likes.  They inevitably, for most people, become "dess" and "ghos-s".

#borecore

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #451 on: October 28, 2012, 01:09:57 PM »
I always hear desks and ghosts with all their letters pronounced (except, arguably, the H in ghosts).

I am editing a book right now in which people put their hands on their wastes and then pick one up and waive it to say hello.

Also, everything that is done has an absurd number of modifiers attached to it. Any time something is said, if the quote is fewer than 5 words, it is "said simply." All thoughts are "thought silently," all hearts "beat inside of (their) chests" and all things that are said in a certain way are "said in a ___ tone" instead of "said __ly."

starry diadem

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #452 on: October 29, 2012, 06:03:14 AM »
starry diadem, I have heard "cliche" instead of "cliched", but I think what happens with "prejudiced" is that people just don't pronounce the hard "d" at the end.  A good example of what I mean is with how people pronounce ghosts, desks, and the likes.  They inevitably, for most people, become "dess" and "ghos-s".

And then it leaks over into their writing, you mean? That makes sense.
Mysterious ravens go after local farmer's potatoes


starry diadem

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #453 on: October 29, 2012, 06:04:44 AM »
I always hear desks and ghosts with all their letters pronounced (except, arguably, the H in ghosts).

I am editing a book right now in which people put their hands on their wastes and then pick one up and waive it to say hello.

Also, everything that is done has an absurd number of modifiers attached to it. Any time something is said, if the quote is fewer than 5 words, it is "said simply." All thoughts are "thought silently," all hearts "beat inside of (their) chests" and all things that are said in a certain way are "said in a ___ tone" instead of "said __ly."

Sounds like a real literary gem!
Mysterious ravens go after local farmer's potatoes


Mental Magpie

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #454 on: October 29, 2012, 08:10:40 AM »
starry diadem, I have heard "cliche" instead of "cliched", but I think what happens with "prejudiced" is that people just don't pronounce the hard "d" at the end.  A good example of what I mean is with how people pronounce ghosts, desks, and the likes.  They inevitably, for most people, become "dess" and "ghos-s".

And then it leaks over into their writing, you mean? That makes sense.

Yes, they are really just spelling what they hear (or think they hear).

Bijou

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #455 on: October 29, 2012, 11:47:11 AM »
I don't know if this is a grammar quirk, but I've noticed that some phrases come out not at all like the words, but still people know what they mean...
"Imuhna eat then go to the show."  ("I'm going to (or I'm gonna) eat then go to the show."
"Wuhduhyuh think?"  ("What do you think?")
There are others I've noticed, but can't recall off the top of my head.  I oways think it's kyna of fascinating,  doenchu?
I've never knitted anything I could recognize when it was finished.  Actually, I've never finished anything, much to my family's relief.

Giggity

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #456 on: October 29, 2012, 12:23:10 PM »
I will go to my grave screeching about the distinction between "over" and "more than."

I also just saw something that made my teeth itch: "over a 100 somethings." Over a one hundred somethings?
Words mean things.

Elfmama

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #457 on: October 29, 2012, 01:40:16 PM »
I always hear desks and ghosts with all their letters pronounced (except, arguably, the H in ghosts).

I am editing a book right now in which people put their hands on their wastes and then pick one up and waive it to say hello.
But the SPELL-CHECK said it was right!!!!

Quote
Also, everything that is done has an absurd number of modifiers attached to it. Any time something is said, if the quote is fewer than 5 words, it is "said simply." All thoughts are "thought silently," all hearts "beat inside of (their) chests" and all things that are said in a certain way are "said in a ___ tone" instead of "said __ly."


Sounds like a real literary gem!
What, you never read any of Jean Auel's caveman books?  The woman is apparently horrified by naked nouns.  They have to be accompanied at all times by at least one and preferably  two adjectives.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

EmmaJ.

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #458 on: October 29, 2012, 01:47:38 PM »
I always hear desks and ghosts with all their letters pronounced (except, arguably, the H in ghosts).

I am editing a book right now in which people put their hands on their wastes and then pick one up and waive it to say hello.
But the SPELL-CHECK said it was right!!!!

Quote
Also, everything that is done has an absurd number of modifiers attached to it. Any time something is said, if the quote is fewer than 5 words, it is "said simply." All thoughts are "thought silently," all hearts "beat inside of (their) chests" and all things that are said in a certain way are "said in a ___ tone" instead of "said __ly."


Sounds like a real literary gem!
What, you never read any of Jean Auel's caveman books?  The woman is apparently horrified by naked nouns.  They have to be accompanied at all times by at least one and preferably  two adjectives.

That (among many other things) irritated me so much I stopped reading the series after the 2nd book.

Yvaine

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #459 on: October 29, 2012, 02:03:08 PM »
"Opportunity" to mean "flaw." I hate this little bit of jargon with a passion. I can kind of see how it evolved, but I'm tired of reading stuff like "This design project had an opportunity in the upper left corner."

Onyx_TKD

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #460 on: October 29, 2012, 02:32:38 PM »
"Opportunity" to mean "flaw." I hate this little bit of jargon with a passion. I can kind of see how it evolved, but I'm tired of reading stuff like "This design project had an opportunity in the upper left corner."

Huh?  ??? What field does this jargon come from?

The only way I see "opportunity" being a synonym for "flaw" is for someone trying to exploit it, and I'm not really seeing how that would happen with something like a design project. E.g., A software bug is a flaw for a programmer, but an "opportunity" for a hacker. A loophole in a rule is a flaw for the rulemaker, but an "opportunity" for someone trying to skirt the rule. How is a flaw in a design project an "opportunity"? ???  Please enlighten me, so that (most likely) I too can hate this bizarre turn of phrase with an (informed) passion.

Yvaine

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #461 on: October 29, 2012, 02:37:46 PM »
"Opportunity" to mean "flaw." I hate this little bit of jargon with a passion. I can kind of see how it evolved, but I'm tired of reading stuff like "This design project had an opportunity in the upper left corner."

Huh?  ??? What field does this jargon come from?

The only way I see "opportunity" being a synonym for "flaw" is for someone trying to exploit it, and I'm not really seeing how that would happen with something like a design project. E.g., A software bug is a flaw for a programmer, but an "opportunity" for a hacker. A loophole in a rule is a flaw for the rulemaker, but an "opportunity" for someone trying to skirt the rule. How is a flaw in a design project an "opportunity"? ???  Please enlighten me, so that (most likely) I too can hate this bizarre turn of phrase with an (informed) passion.

It's an "opportunity" to improve, don't you see? (I know, totally annoying. Especially when the project is irrevocably DONE and there's no "opportunity" to actually change whatever was wrong with it.)

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #462 on: October 29, 2012, 02:59:40 PM »
"Opportunity" to mean "flaw." I hate this little bit of jargon with a passion. I can kind of see how it evolved, but I'm tired of reading stuff like "This design project had an opportunity in the upper left corner."

Huh?  ??? What field does this jargon come from?

The only way I see "opportunity" being a synonym for "flaw" is for someone trying to exploit it, and I'm not really seeing how that would happen with something like a design project. E.g., A software bug is a flaw for a programmer, but an "opportunity" for a hacker. A loophole in a rule is a flaw for the rulemaker, but an "opportunity" for someone trying to skirt the rule. How is a flaw in a design project an "opportunity"? ???  Please enlighten me, so that (most likely) I too can hate this bizarre turn of phrase with an (informed) passion.

It's an "opportunity" to improve, don't you see? (I know, totally annoying. Especially when the project is irrevocably DONE and there's no "opportunity" to actually change whatever was wrong with it.)

I think since the tense is "had" it's like "You had the opportunity to do something here, and you FAILED to capitalize!"
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Giggity

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #463 on: October 29, 2012, 04:09:45 PM »
Have I mentioned the Missing Neither yet?

"My husband nor I are interested in your service, but thanks."

What does that even mean? If you got a Nor, you must have a Neither at the same time.
Words mean things.

SingActDance

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #464 on: October 29, 2012, 04:12:12 PM »
NO the theatre is where you have your operation, the surgery is where your GP practices

No, the theater is where you go to watch movies.  :D

No, the theatre is where you go to see live plays.  The cinema is where you go to watch films.

Ah, the joys of a common language.

The one that gets me is the difference between theater & theatre. Theater is the venue, theatre is the art form. I hate when people write that they want a career in theater. I'm thinking, "Great, we need somebody to clean the lobby."
Most people look at musical theatre and think "Why are those people singing and dancing in the street?" I'm sort of the opposite. I see a street full of people and think, "Why aren't they?"