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Author Topic: Grammar quirks  (Read 143345 times)

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stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #465 on: October 29, 2012, 04:13:41 PM »
NO the theatre is where you have your operation, the surgery is where your GP practices

No, the theater is where you go to watch movies.  :D

No, the theatre is where you go to see live plays.  The cinema is where you go to watch films.

Ah, the joys of a common language.

The one that gets me is the difference between theater & theatre. Theater is the venue, theatre is the art form. I hate when people write that they want a career in theater. I'm thinking, "Great, we need somebody to clean the lobby."
Ö and I just attribute those to the er/re differences between American/British English.

Venus193

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #466 on: October 29, 2012, 04:18:47 PM »
Since we're on the subject I hate when people pronounce that "thee-AY-tur."  It sounds so uneducated.





Giggity

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #467 on: October 29, 2012, 04:22:46 PM »
How about "THEE-uh-truh"? That makes my teeth itch.
Words mean things.

Yvaine

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #468 on: October 29, 2012, 04:31:42 PM »
How about "THEE-uh-truh"? That makes my teeth itch.

Eeek! I have never heard that one before!

Giggity

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #469 on: October 29, 2012, 04:38:41 PM »
Oh yeah. I mostly hear that from my (grew-up-in-Texas) friends who wish to be thought cultured. These are generally the same people who think that a British accent is classy, so they affect one.

No, they don't do the accent or the vocab well. You don't mix U and Non-U, nor do you mix posh and cockney.

And no, Jeri Hall is not one of my friends.
Words mean things.

Barney girl

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #470 on: October 29, 2012, 05:47:42 PM »
One that irritates me is the use of 'entitled' which is often used on this site. So you might see something along the lines of - "the bride was so entitled and had the bridesmaids write all her thank you letters."
No, she wasn't entitled to this, just the opposite. I know it's being used as a shorthand for "she acted as though she were entitled ...", but it sets my teeth on edge every time I see it.  ::)

starry diadem

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #471 on: October 29, 2012, 06:12:01 PM »
NO the theatre is where you have your operation, the surgery is where your GP practices

No, the theater is where you go to watch movies.  :D

No, the theatre is where you go to see live plays.  The cinema is where you go to watch films.

Ah, the joys of a common language.

The one that gets me is the difference between theater & theatre. Theater is the venue, theatre is the art form. I hate when people write that they want a career in theater. I'm thinking, "Great, we need somebody to clean the lobby."

Um, so far as this Brit is concerned, there is no such distinction, and we do not have venues called 'theaters'.  That's the US spelling.  Theatre is both the venue and the art form.
Mysterious ravens go after local farmer's potatoes


Bijou

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #472 on: October 29, 2012, 11:28:56 PM »
NO the theatre is where you have your operation, the surgery is where your GP practices

No, the theater is where you go to watch movies.  :D

No, the theatre is where you go to see live plays.  The cinema is where you go to watch films.

Ah, the joys of a common language.

The one that gets me is the difference between theater & theatre. Theater is the venue, theatre is the art form. I hate when people write that they want a career in theater. I'm thinking, "Great, we need somebody to clean the lobby."
Whoops!  I often use the spelling theatre.  According to my search online, theater and theatre do mean the same thing.   Are you getting different information in your searching?  Since I prefer theatre, I'd like to know.   
I've never knitted anything I could recognize when it was finished.  Actually, I've never finished anything, much to my family's relief.

Bijou

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #473 on: October 29, 2012, 11:32:28 PM »
NO the theatre is where you have your operation, the surgery is where your GP practices

No, the theater is where you go to watch movies.  :D

No, the theatre is where you go to see live plays.  The cinema is where you go to watch films.

Ah, the joys of a common language.

The one that gets me is the difference between theater & theatre. Theater is the venue, theatre is the art form. I hate when people write that they want a career in theater. I'm thinking, "Great, we need somebody to clean the lobby."

Um, so far as this Brit is concerned, there is no such distinction, and we do not have venues called 'theaters'.  That's the US spelling.  Theatre is both the venue and the art form.
I agree with this Brit.  What I read is that the USA does theater and most other places do theatre.  I'm in the US but prefer theatre.  I just like the way it looks.  I notice that this spell check doesn't recognize theatre, but does theater. 
I've never knitted anything I could recognize when it was finished.  Actually, I've never finished anything, much to my family's relief.

Bijou

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #474 on: October 29, 2012, 11:34:40 PM »
Regardless and Irregardless.  I don't think there is such a word as irregardless, or at least it is considered mostly as incorrect. 
I've never knitted anything I could recognize when it was finished.  Actually, I've never finished anything, much to my family's relief.

Bijou

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #475 on: October 29, 2012, 11:38:31 PM »
Another verbal tick that I hate in print:  "Jus' sayin'."

It sounds very low-class.
I hate that, too.
I've never knitted anything I could recognize when it was finished.  Actually, I've never finished anything, much to my family's relief.

starry diadem

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #476 on: October 30, 2012, 03:29:06 AM »

Quote tree snipped, because it was getting ridiculously long

I agree with this Brit.  What I read is that the USA does theater and most other places do theatre.  I'm in the US but prefer theatre.  I just like the way it looks.  I notice that this spell check doesn't recognize theatre, but does theater.

British English tends to retain the spelling of the language from which we stole the word -  theatre, centre, litre, metre for example all retain their original French letter order.  In the US, spelling became more standardised and simplified.  And of course, the story goes that Noah Webster had a political point to make about trying to separate US and British English to underscore your break from colonial rule and deliberately changed the spellings of many words to reflect that. 
Mysterious ravens go after local farmer's potatoes


GreenHall

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #477 on: October 30, 2012, 08:16:13 AM »
Heard this on the radio this morning (NPR of all places).  I know it was a case of the first part of the first word getting dropped, I translated, and yet still, I heard...

'snot ('snot likely to matter...blah blah blah politics/Sandy)

I've seen this in books, dialog for young or uneducated characters, if I never hear it again in real life, it's still too much.

#borecore

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #478 on: October 30, 2012, 09:49:51 AM »
More gems from my latest project:

Everyone "turned and (did the next thing)." Why can't they just DO something once, rather than turning first? No one, in a quote, asks a question that ends with a question mark.

Something torn apart (metaphorically) was "rent."

Anything that's not concrete or obvious is "some kind of" something.

Every heart "beats very hard inside of his chest," everyone "stares deeply into (someone's) eyes silently," every pain is "deep inside of (his) gut." Every thought is "thought silently." Memories are always "flashing like photographs through (his) mind."

I don't actually hate cliche, but this is incredible.

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #479 on: October 30, 2012, 11:28:28 AM »
Just curious, what is wrong with describing something torn apart (even metaphorically) as having been rent? Thatís one definition of that word / is the past and past participle of "rend".