Author Topic: Grammar quirks  (Read 44778 times)

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Slartibartfast

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #495 on: October 31, 2012, 04:11:43 PM »
I'm all for poetic license, but I must take issue with rhyming things like

'Cause baby, you're a firework
Come on, show 'em what you're worth
Make 'em go "oh, oh, oh!"
As you shoot across the sky-y-y

oz diva

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #496 on: November 01, 2012, 07:46:20 AM »
Inquire vs enquire. I'd mostly use enquire as in if you are interested you may enquire. But our new communications person at work uses inquire. Which is correct?

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #497 on: November 01, 2012, 08:35:44 AM »
I use inquire.

Ignorant means "without knowledge" not "rude".
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

ClaireC79

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #498 on: November 01, 2012, 10:07:36 AM »

Barney girl

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #499 on: November 01, 2012, 10:11:59 AM »
I use inquire.

Ignorant means "without knowledge" not "rude".

That's interesting  - I only ever came across 'ignorant' being used for 'rude' when I lived in Yorkshire for a few years.  I'd always assumed it was a Yorkshire turn of phrase.

lady_disdain

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #500 on: November 01, 2012, 11:00:33 AM »
I use inquire.

Ignorant means "without knowledge" not "rude".

That's interesting  - I only ever came across 'ignorant' being used for 'rude' when I lived in Yorkshire for a few years.  I'd always assumed it was a Yorkshire turn of phrase.

I would imagine it is used as short hand for "ignorant of good manners".

cabbageweevil

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #501 on: November 01, 2012, 11:43:40 AM »
I'm all for poetic license, but I must take issue with rhyming things like

'Cause baby, you're a firework
Come on, show 'em what you're worth
Make 'em go "oh, oh, oh!"
As you shoot across the sky-y-y

I agree -- if you're a normal-and-standard English user, that rhyme's awful. Can imagine the perpetrator maybe trying to save face by claiming to be writing in a tradition where perfect rhymes are not required.

I gather that Ireland offers an instance of this. Apparently in Irish Gaelic poetry, so long as the vowels rhyme, the consonants' agreeing in that way is somewhat less important. The Irish sometimes carry this convention over into when they're composing verse in English. Thus we have in the song about the Galway Races:

"As I roved out through Galway town, to seek for recreation,
 On the seventeenth of July, my mind was elevated:
 There were multitudes assembled with their tickets at the station,
 And my eyes began to dazzle, and they go to see the races."

It would seem that around Galway at any rate, "races" is regarded as a perfectly good rhyme for "elevated".




scotcat60

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #502 on: November 02, 2012, 10:29:31 AM »
My husband dislikes the term, "Me, too!"   He thinks the proper phrase is, "As do I."

This reminds me of those scenes in films where on character says to the other "I love you" and gets the reply "Me too" which sounds to me like the second person is saying that they love themselves. What's wrong with  "I love you too" ?

SingActDance

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #503 on: November 05, 2012, 02:30:29 PM »
NO the theatre is where you have your operation, the surgery is where your GP practices

No, the theater is where you go to watch movies.  :D

No, the theatre is where you go to see live plays.  The cinema is where you go to watch films.

Ah, the joys of a common language.

The one that gets me is the difference between theater & theatre. Theater is the venue, theatre is the art form. I hate when people write that they want a career in theater. I'm thinking, "Great, we need somebody to clean the lobby."
Whoops!  I often use the spelling theatre.  According to my search online, theater and theatre do mean the same thing.   Are you getting different information in your searching?  Since I prefer theatre, I'd like to know.

Yes, I should have made the distinction between US and British spellings. Truly, I prefer "theatre" in all cases, whether talking about the venue or the art form. But I recognize that in the US it's common to use "theater" when referring to the physical building. I just hate when people use "theater" to describe the art form.
Most people look at musical theatre and think "Why are those people singing and dancing in the street?" I'm sort of the opposite. I see a street full of people and think, "Why aren't they?"

Onyx_TKD

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #504 on: November 05, 2012, 02:56:06 PM »
NO the theatre is where you have your operation, the surgery is where your GP practices

No, the theater is where you go to watch movies.  :D

No, the theatre is where you go to see live plays.  The cinema is where you go to watch films.

Ah, the joys of a common language.

The one that gets me is the difference between theater & theatre. Theater is the venue, theatre is the art form. I hate when people write that they want a career in theater. I'm thinking, "Great, we need somebody to clean the lobby."
Whoops!  I often use the spelling theatre.  According to my search online, theater and theatre do mean the same thing.   Are you getting different information in your searching?  Since I prefer theatre, I'd like to know.

Yes, I should have made the distinction between US and British spellings. Truly, I prefer "theatre" in all cases, whether talking about the venue or the art form. But I recognize that in the US it's common to use "theater" when referring to the physical building. I just hate when people use "theater" to describe the art form.

Can you tell us your source for this distinction? Or are you just stating your own personal quirk? It sounded like you're saying this is an established difference in definition, but I've never heard of this distinction and haven't found it in the dictionaries I've checked, either.

Merriam-Webster, for example, defines "theater" as both the physical venue and
Quote
4a : dramatic literature : plays
b : dramatic representation as an art or profession : drama.
It has no separate definition for "theatre." It simply lists "theatre" as a variant of "theater."

The Oxford English Dictionary likewise defines both the physical venue and the art form within the same entry, labeled "theatre | theater." I did not see any indication that there was  distinction in meaning associated with the spelling.