Author Topic: authentic fairy bread recipe  (Read 9520 times)

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Iris

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #15 on: July 23, 2012, 03:59:03 AM »
Can I just love this thread for a moment?

First of all, I love fairy anything, and I've never even heard of fairy bread. Adorable!

Secondly, I get to add "hundreds and thousands" to my mind as a sweet word for tiny multi-colored candy sprinkly things. (Here, almost any of those types of things are referred to as "sprinkles", which is also an adorable word.)

Hurray thread, and fairy things, and great words for sweets! ^^

Just so we're clear - the sprinkles pictured on this site *and no others* are hundreds and thousands. All other sprinkles are just sprinkles and pale, sad imitations :)

http://www.istockphoto.com/stock-photo-106731-hundreds-and-thousands.php
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TheVapors

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #16 on: July 23, 2012, 04:04:59 AM »
Can I just love this thread for a moment?

First of all, I love fairy anything, and I've never even heard of fairy bread. Adorable!

Secondly, I get to add "hundreds and thousands" to my mind as a sweet word for tiny multi-colored candy sprinkly things. (Here, almost any of those types of things are referred to as "sprinkles", which is also an adorable word.)

Hurray thread, and fairy things, and great words for sweets! ^^

Just so we're clear - the sprinkles pictured on this site *and no others* are hundreds and thousands. All other sprinkles are just sprinkles and pale, sad imitations :)

http://www.istockphoto.com/stock-photo-106731-hundreds-and-thousands.php

Yus! Tiny, little balls of sugar :) Cute, and delish!

And I do happen to like those better than the elongated sprinkles. I believe if I were in a cooking class, here where I am, they are referred to as nonpareils. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonpareils)

Sprinkles, again, here where I am is a much more generic term for... "tiny sugar candies that are sprinkled on top of stuff". (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sprinkles)

Redsoil

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #17 on: July 23, 2012, 08:36:29 AM »
Sorry, dissenting voice from the Aussie Bush, here.

Hundreds and thousands may well be traditional for fairy bread, but they "crack" against one's teeth.  Rainbow sprinkles are much better, because they "smoosh".

Seriously - I won't eat fairy bread if it's not sprinkles!
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Thipu1

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #18 on: July 23, 2012, 09:40:53 AM »
Oh, BTW. 

If I read things correctly, what the Aussies call hundreds and thousands are probably what we call nonpareils. 

AmethystAnne

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #19 on: July 26, 2012, 05:02:48 PM »
I had read about fairy bread in old Harlequin romances, and expected something really fancy and somewhat complicated to make.

After reading the how-to in this thread, and then to click on the first link....the thought that ran through my mind was It's a fancier looking version of my GrammaH's "bread and butter with sugar sprinkled on top".  8)




MacadamiaNut

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #20 on: July 26, 2012, 05:20:14 PM »
I'd never heard of fairy bread.  Before finishing the thread, I was assuming it was something fancy and complicated too. 

Question: You don't toast the bread so the margarine is melty?  I can't wrap my head around the cold margarine... Can you at least warm the margarine?
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Sheila Take a Bow

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #21 on: July 26, 2012, 06:03:48 PM »
I had read about fairy bread in old Harlequin romances, and expected something really fancy and somewhat complicated to make.

After reading the how-to in this thread, and then to click on the first link....the thought that ran through my mind was It's a fancier looking version of my GrammaH's "bread and butter with sugar sprinkled on top".  8)

My dad used to give us that when I was a kid!  My mom thought it was the most awful treat ever.  I didn't realize that people other than my dad made that....

MummyPumpkin83

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #22 on: July 26, 2012, 11:13:10 PM »
I'd never heard of fairy bread.  Before finishing the thread, I was assuming it was something fancy and complicated too. 

Question: You don't toast the bread so the margarine is melty?  I can't wrap my head around the cold margarine... Can you at least warm the margarine?

The margarine neds to be soft, but still "solid" so that it kind of acts like glue to hold the hundreds and thousands on.
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MacadamiaNut

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #23 on: July 27, 2012, 10:13:33 AM »
I'd never heard of fairy bread.  Before finishing the thread, I was assuming it was something fancy and complicated too. 

Question: You don't toast the bread so the margarine is melty?  I can't wrap my head around the cold margarine... Can you at least warm the margarine?

The margarine neds to be soft, but still "solid" so that it kind of acts like glue to hold the hundreds and thousands on.

Oh I see.  Yes, that makes sense.
Paperweights, for instance - has anyone ever established what, when, and why
paper has to be weighed down? ::) ~Don Aslett

rain

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #24 on: July 28, 2012, 11:42:46 AM »
 :-[ when I first heard about fairy bread here - I thought it'd be something fancy/homemade.  Then, when I googled it & saw the recipes were simplistic .... I thought I hadn't found the "real thing" so I asked here.

If DS were still young I'd make it, guess I'll have to wait until I'm a grandma.
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Iris

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #25 on: July 28, 2012, 06:54:45 PM »
:-[ when I first heard about fairy bread here - I thought it'd be something fancy/homemade.  Then, when I googled it & saw the recipes were simplistic .... I thought I hadn't found the "real thing" so I asked here.

If DS were still young I'd make it, guess I'll have to wait until I'm a grandma.

Sorry to have disillusioned you. It really is very yummy though.  :)
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

WestAussieGirl

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #26 on: July 28, 2012, 07:31:16 PM »
I was at a birthday party the other day and the mum had cut the crusts off the fairy bread because the kids never eat them.  It was the funniest thing ever because every single kid left a little crust-width strip on their plate.  I guess they are so used to not eating the "handle" they didn't even realise it wasn't a crust.   :D

MummyPumpkin83

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #27 on: August 18, 2012, 05:03:43 AM »
:-[ when I first heard about fairy bread here - I thought it'd be something fancy/homemade.  Then, when I googled it & saw the recipes were simplistic .... I thought I hadn't found the "real thing" so I asked here.

If DS were still young I'd make it, guess I'll have to wait until I'm a grandma.

Fairy bread is okay for any age group, not just kids! Go for it!

I totally I agree. I have kids, but sometimes when they aren't home I make myself fairy bread as a teat!
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Shotochick

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #28 on: August 19, 2012, 10:36:09 AM »
POD to everyone - but rather than sprink the 100's and 1000's, tip them all onto a plate and press the buttered bread into them so you get a good ingrained coating. It makes all the difference!!
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katycoo

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Re: authentic fairy bread recipe
« Reply #29 on: August 19, 2012, 08:35:19 PM »
There is debate about whether hundreds and thousands (tiny round balls) or sprinkles are better.

No there isn't.  Round sprinkles are the only option for fairy bread.  Anyone who thinks otherwise is wrongity-wrong.

Pour on as many hundreds and thousands as you can get to stick. I do this in a baking tray to catch all the ones that fall off. Hundreads and thousands are the multi-coloured ball shaped sprinkles. These are the only permittable sprinkles to be used  ;)

I find it neater to fill a plate with sprinkles and press the buttered bread into them.  Saves them flying everywhere.

Sorry, dissenting voice from the Aussie Bush, here.

Hundreds and thousands may well be traditional for fairy bread, but they "crack" against one's teeth.  Rainbow sprinkles are much better, because they "smoosh".

Seriously - I won't eat fairy bread if it's not sprinkles!

UNAUSTRALIAN!  The crunch is what makes it awesome.

I'd never heard of fairy bread.  Before finishing the thread, I was assuming it was something fancy and complicated too. 

Question: You don't toast the bread so the margarine is melty?  I can't wrap my head around the cold margarine... Can you at least warm the margarine?

No.  Toast would steal the crunchy from sprinkles, and be less pliable to eat.  Melted butter wouldn't stick the sprinkles to the bread and the colours would run.

Room temperature is fine - it doesn't need to be 'cold'.  Just solidish.

:-[ when I first heard about fairy bread here - I thought it'd be something fancy/homemade.  Then, when I googled it & saw the recipes were simplistic .... I thought I hadn't found the "real thing" so I asked here.

If DS were still young I'd make it, guess I'll have to wait until I'm a grandma.

Piffle.   You don't have to make up a whol loaf.  Just make a slice to taste.

If it was fancied up, it wouldn't be as good.