Author Topic: Coffee and American guests  (Read 8437 times)

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O'Dell

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #30 on: August 03, 2012, 09:23:49 AM »
This thread reminded me of my BFF from college's dad.  Neither she or any of her 4 siblings drink coffee, so one year for Christmas, they all got small coffee makers from him.  For his use, when he came to visit!  I thought that was a great idea!  With this same friend, I actually brought my small coffee maker one time, and coffee, as she didn't have any at the time, and I need my caffeine!

I'm really failing to see how this was considered a gift for them... he basically bought something for himself, which is no better than that episode of The Simpsons when Homer bought Marge that bowling ball for her birthday... even though she doesn't bowl... with his own name engraved on it. ::)

I'm with you. I mean I like my coffee and all, but I'd really resent someone gifting me with something for their use when they visit with me having to find a place to store the darn thing the rest of the time. Now if someone visited me often and *asked* me if they bought one would I be willing to keep it, I might comply if I really liked the person. But to make it a present as if they were being generous would and has chapped my hide. My MIL has been known to do this sort of thing.
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Hmmmmm

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #31 on: August 03, 2012, 10:22:25 AM »
I am an American coffee drinker.  Two cups in the morning.  But I'll forgo coffee if instant is the only opton. 

Unless you keep instant on hand, I wouldn't go buy any for them.  It could be a waste of money.  When they arrive, let them know there is tea available and a Starbucks around the corner.  Or they are also free to pick up some coffee and a cheap french press or like a Melitta single cup brew system and some ground coffee from the store.

I would never expect a host to provide coffee in their home if they didn't also consume it.


Shoo

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #32 on: August 03, 2012, 11:13:27 AM »
I think letting them know about the Starbucks around the corner is all you need to do.  You are already doing them a tremendous favor by allowing them to stay in your home. You don't have to cater to them, as well.  If they need coffee that badly, they'll make their way to the Starbucks.

MacadamiaNut

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #33 on: August 03, 2012, 11:51:20 AM »
I think letting them know about the Starbucks around the corner is all you need to do.  You are already doing them a tremendous favor by allowing them to stay in your home. You don't have to cater to them, as well.  If they need coffee that badly, they'll make their way to the Starbucks.

I agree that this is a fine option too.  Besides, most Starbuck's fans will have already scoped out the neighborhood for one before they even arrive at your place and you might find them saying they already know about it!
Paperweights, for instance - has anyone ever established what, when, and why
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bah12

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #34 on: August 03, 2012, 11:51:58 AM »
I'm a big coffee drinker and one of those people who differentiates coffee like some people do wine. 

But even so, when I'm a guest in someone else's home, I don't expect them to have the best coffee on hand...or even any coffee on hand if they are not coffee drinkers themselves.  If I were in the OP's home and all she had was instant and I needed that morning jolt, I'd happily take the instant.  I certaintly wouldn't find the hospitality lacking.  Especially knowing that she doesn't drink coffee at all and was nice enough to have something to offer me.

OP, I think offering instant coffee and letting them know where the closest coffee shop is to get their own coffee is just fine.  I think it's really considerate of you to even think about it.

WillyNilly

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #35 on: August 03, 2012, 01:32:12 PM »
This thread reminded me of my BFF from college's dad.  Neither she or any of her 4 siblings drink coffee, so one year for Christmas, they all got small coffee makers from him.  For his use, when he came to visit!  I thought that was a great idea!  With this same friend, I actually brought my small coffee maker one time, and coffee, as she didn't have any at the time, and I need my caffeine!

This reminds me of me.  I have had more then my fair share of long term but didn't work out boyfriends in my adult life.  And I have left a trail of mini coffee pots in my wake.  So very many of the guys I dated didn't have a coffee pot yet expected me to spend the night.  Well!  I'm just not that kinda girl, I tell ya!  I need my coffee!  So off to Target for the $10 small, "two cup" (really 1.5 large mug) drip coffee pot to live at their houses. 

I never did present it as a present for them (although in every case I left it after the break-up) but I also never got any resistance to co-opting a piece of counter top real estate for it.

kkl123

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #36 on: August 03, 2012, 01:39:04 PM »
My husband likes coffee; I don't.  He's also picky about coffee (hates Starbucks and similar "over-roasted" types.  At home he uses an Aeropress, which is sort of a giant syringe device with room for a coffee filter, and weighs very little.  When we travel, I just toss it and a bag of coffee in his suitcase so I don't have to listen to the whining.  Your guests may have similar preferences and equipment.

audrey1962

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #37 on: August 03, 2012, 01:41:57 PM »
I'm American. If a household normally doesn't buy coffee or have the equipment to make it, then all I need is directions to the nearest coffee house. :)

EMuir

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #38 on: August 03, 2012, 03:01:31 PM »
 I wouldn't buy instant coffee if you don't already have some.  I love coffee, but despise instant!  If you could find a one-cup coffee filter that sits on the mug, you just pour water through, that plus some ground coffee might be cheap and a much better alternative. That would be going above and beyond though, if the coffee shop is that close.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #39 on: August 03, 2012, 07:14:17 PM »
This thread reminded me of my BFF from college's dad.  Neither she or any of her 4 siblings drink coffee, so one year for Christmas, they all got small coffee makers from him.  For his use, when he came to visit!  I thought that was a great idea!  With this same friend, I actually brought my small coffee maker one time, and coffee, as she didn't have any at the time, and I need my caffeine!

I'm really failing to see how this was considered a gift for them... he basically bought something for himself, which is no better than that episode of The Simpsons when Homer bought Marge that bowling ball for her birthday... even though she doesn't bowl... with his own name engraved on it. ::)

I'm with you. I mean I like my coffee and all, but I'd really resent someone gifting me with something for their use when they visit with me having to find a place to store the darn thing the rest of the time. Now if someone visited me often and *asked* me if they bought one would I be willing to keep it, I might comply if I really liked the person. But to make it a present as if they were being generous would and has chapped my hide. My MIL has been known to do this sort of thing.

Her dad was a big jokester, and it wasn't their only gift.  Apparently he got a bunch very cheap, so each kid got one.  They all thought it was hilarious and a great idea since he was very much into his coffee!  I think its a know your audience type of thing; some people may have been offended to get that type of gift, but no one in her family was.

MacadamiaNut

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #40 on: August 05, 2012, 12:02:49 PM »
^^^ Well alright, we'll let him off the hook this time ;).  Definitely a 'know your audience' thing.  I agree.
Paperweights, for instance - has anyone ever established what, when, and why
paper has to be weighed down? ::) ~Don Aslett

hyzenthlay

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #41 on: August 05, 2012, 12:31:51 PM »
I'm an AMerican and I don't drink coffee at all.  In the morning I am most likely to drink (skim) milk.  I think I would ask them what they like and to the best of your ability provide it 0  without getting something like a coffee maker.

Oh, good point about the milk! I normally have semi-skim in the house, perhaps I should have skim as well. Thanks for reminding me!

I wouldn't bother. I personally use skim, but am fine with semi-skim.  Many people find skim milk to be undrinkable.  I don't drink coffee myself, and since Diet Coke is my caffeinated beverage of choice I ususally plan to buy my own. I certainly don't expect my ousts to have it on hand.

Dindrane

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #42 on: August 05, 2012, 02:02:21 PM »
I think you are being very thoughtful.

I am also an American coffee drinker, but I don't drink coffee every day of the week when I'm at home (I don't bother with it on weekends, usually).  I am also quite happy to substitute strong black tea (with milk and sugar) for coffee, if that's what's available.  I'd much rather good tea than bad (or instant) coffee.  I drink coffee mostly for the taste and the comfort of it (it is nice to start the day with a hot drink), rather than the caffeine.

Since you don't live in the US (I'm assuming), I will also point out that many American travelers know that food/beverages aren't going to be exactly what they are used to when they travel elsewhere.  Especially if they have done any traveling outside the US before.  Even those who aren't aware of it would, I think, be more than fine with knowing there's a Starbuck's nearby.

I think that if you (or your friend) have the ability to contact the houseguests before they arrive, just mention that you are not a coffee drinker, but you do have tea, you could acquire instant coffee, and there is a Starbucks right around the corner.  That will alert them to the fact that you don't have drip coffee in your home, but that there are some options if they feel they need it first thing.  And if they are the type of people who really won't drink instant coffee, they have the opportunity to say something before you've actually purchased it.


Winterlight

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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #43 on: August 06, 2012, 09:16:29 AM »
I hate the taste of coffee and normally drink water or occasionally soy milk in the morning. If you want to have something on hand, I'd just ask them what they like, otherwise, there's always your local Starbucks. It's kind of you to think about it, though.
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Re: Coffee and American guests
« Reply #44 on: August 06, 2012, 09:35:34 AM »
I am echoing the other posters and saying that you are so sweet to think of your guests.

I am a big coffee drinker (and I consider instant coffee to be a VERY pale version of the drink) but I would not inflict my preferences on my hostess if he or she is not into coffee.  I would ask for the nearest coffee shop (local) and head that way - I can't drink Starbucks coffee).
 :)
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