Author Topic: Clothes lines  (Read 21335 times)

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jmarvellous

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #30 on: August 08, 2012, 06:26:12 PM »
We use a dryer, and I grew up using one. In Michigan, we had a drying thing that looked kind of like an umbrella with the covering parts made of cords to hang stuff on. In Texas, we had a rope line for big blankets or beach towels, but we used the dryer for everything else.

I also have an indoor Ikea rack for delicate stuff or things prone to shrinking. Our complex's dryers run hot!

dawbs

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #31 on: August 08, 2012, 06:36:44 PM »
I wouldn't mind one of the umbrella ones.

But, generally, I just hang things in the laundry room, either on the rack or on hangers from the ceiling or the clothes rack in the corner.  I air dry a lot of clothes w/o a rack

I don't really see me carrying heavy, wet laundry up a flight of stairs from the basement. Same floor laundry would make it much more workable.

baglady

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #32 on: August 08, 2012, 06:59:25 PM »
Northeastern USA here: Even though I know hanging the laundry is good for the environment, part of me still thinks of a clothesline as a big neon sign that says, "We can't afford a dryer!" because that's why we didn't have one when I was growing up. We hung clothes outside whenever weather permitted; we had clotheslines in the basement for winter and rainy days.

There are times I wish I had one, though, for very large items I don't want to put in the dryer but are too bulky to hang in my usual hanging spot.

I don't own a washer or dryer; I go to the laundromat, and anything I don't want to put in the dryer gets hung to dry on a hanger in the bathroom (which is very large and doesn't have moisture issues).
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katycoo

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #33 on: August 08, 2012, 10:19:41 PM »
HOA's are sounding like a PITA I have to say...

An outdoor clothes line is illegal by city ordinance where I live.  They are seen to be an ugly eyesore that poor people own.  On par with having a non-function car on cinderblocks in your yard.   

I find this mindset particularly amusing.  I guess we don't see them as ugly as its such a common sight.  Also - they're in backyard.  One should not be looking over the neighbours fence.

I have a dryer but it really only gets used if its been raining for days, or if we've run out of pegs/space on the line and indoor airer.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2012, 10:22:06 PM by katycoo »

Sophia

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #34 on: August 08, 2012, 10:58:32 PM »
I think it is just one of those different ideas for different areas.  An unfenced backyard is freaky-weird here.  Where my neighbors live having one is darn-right unneighborly. 

CakeEater

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #35 on: August 09, 2012, 03:45:30 AM »
I'm finding the idea that people don't want others looking at their underwear a bit amusing. I've lived in Australian suburbia my whole life, where everyone hangs everything outside, and I can't remember ever taking note of my neighbors' underwear. Although, I had a co-worker who would never hang mismatched sheet sets out in case the neighbors thought she slept in mismatched sheets.

BC12

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #36 on: August 09, 2012, 04:15:34 AM »
This thread is strangely fascinating.

At the risk of looking like a doofus, I'll be honest and tell you all that I have never, ever used a clothesline in my entire life. I don't even really know how. So I have some possibly naive questions for those who use a clothesline almost exclusively.

-How long do clothes typically take to dry indoors? What about outdoors? I know weather plays a huge factor in this, but I'm just looking for an approximation.

-I noticed a few posters mention that they have clotheslines in their apartments. So, when you do laundry, do you have, say, ten shirts, seven pairs of socks, and nine underpants hanging in your living space? Or do you not wait until all your clothes are dirty to finally do a few loads of laundry (like me)?

-Does your wet laundry drip water onto your floors?

-Do you have to iron all of your air-dried clothing? Or do the wrinkles caused by the spin cycle magically disappear like they do when I use my dryer?

I have more questions, but I'll stop there. It'd be super nice to be able to dry things in my apartment, so I'm really curious about anyone's answers.

Venus193

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #37 on: August 09, 2012, 06:40:43 AM »
I once thought about buying a folding indoor rack for drying clothes, but I have cats.

I will wash certain things and hang them up on the showerhead; as a single person I don't need to go to the laundromat more than once a week.

camlan

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #38 on: August 09, 2012, 07:28:04 AM »
I'm finding the idea that people don't want others looking at their underwear a bit amusing. I've lived in Australian suburbia my whole life, where everyone hangs everything outside, and I can't remember ever taking note of my neighbors' underwear. Although, I had a co-worker who would never hang mismatched sheet sets out in case the neighbors thought she slept in mismatched sheets.

I have to admit that when I was a kid and hanging up the family's laundry, I "hide" the underwear by putting it on a line between two other lines of clothing or sheets or towels. (We had a drying area with 5 lines.) One of my friends puts the underwear on the line, then puts a sheet over it all. Still dries pretty quickly.
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Ereine

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #39 on: August 09, 2012, 07:58:00 AM »
I imagine in most of the more northern parts of the world you'd wake up to clothes that were frozen solid.

Clothes dry as the freeze, that is they don't end up a solid lump of ice but just dry clothes (apparently the water freezes and the ice sublimates into water vapor and the clothes dry, or something like that).

I'm in Finland and my apartment complex is well-equipped for drying clothes. There's a clothes line outside, it's a very common type here with metal body and several lines. There's also a fully metal version drying rugs. We also have a drier in our laundry room and a drying room with clothes lines and a machine that blows hot air. I don't use that much as it takes something like 8 hours to really dry. I use the dryer for sheets (sometimes I use the lines outside but I'm allergic to pollen so I usually avoid it in the summer, sheets smell and feel so much nicer though than with the dryer) and hang-dry my clothes on a rack in my apartment. I do have to plan it, as it takes a few days for all my clothes to be dry but if there are a lot of clothes that can handle dryers available here they are the sort I wouldn't want to wear. Apart from pollen the biggest reason I don't use the outside line is laziness, it's much closer to home from the laundry room and hanging clothes outside requires additional steps like worrying about the weather and taking them home when they're dry. Also the line is next to a street and possibly someone could steal my clothes and I probably wouldn't feel comfortable with my underwear on show.

dawbs

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #40 on: August 09, 2012, 08:34:08 AM »
I once thought about buying a folding indoor rack for drying clothes, but I have cats.

I will wash certain things and hang them up on the showerhead; as a single person I don't need to go to the laundromat more than once a week.

This kind of rack can be knocked down by cats, (so they're locked out of the laundry room) but they can't really climb it or what not


THIS kind is no longer in my house because the cats LOVED to curl up on damp sweaters and sleep on them--and render them dirty doing so.

Margo

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #41 on: August 09, 2012, 08:44:58 AM »
This thread is strangely fascinating.

At the risk of looking like a doofus, I'll be honest and tell you all that I have never, ever used a clothesline in my entire life. I don't even really know how. So I have some possibly naive questions for those who use a clothesline almost exclusively.

-How long do clothes typically take to dry indoors? What about outdoors? I know weather plays a huge factor in this, but I'm just looking for an approximation.
It varies a lot, as you say - jeans take a lot longer than this t-shirts, then there is the weather factor. I would say anything from 15 minutes to 2 hours,
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-I noticed a few posters mention that they have clotheslines in their apartments. So, when you do laundry, do you have, say, ten shirts, seven pairs of socks, and nine underpants hanging in your living space? Or do you not wait until all your clothes are dirty to finally do a few loads of laundry (like me)?
If I can't put mine outside, I have some freestanding airers - I usually put mine in my spare bedroom or in my (glassed in) back porch, so they are not in the areas I am actually using. At my parent's old house we had retratable lines which were above the tub in the bathroom. My gradma had a wooden airer on a pulley which hung in the kitchen ceiling, but it was high enough up that it didn't really impinge on the living space unless she had something like double sheets on it.
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-Does your wet laundry drip water onto your floors?
No, by the time the washing has been through the spin cyle in the machine it's not dripping. If I have stuff which I've hand washed or which is too delicate for the spin cycle, so it's lkely to drip, I will stand the airer in or over the bath so it doesn't drip on the floor.

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-Do you have to iron all of your air-dried clothing? Or do the wrinkles caused by the spin cycle magically disappear like they do when I use my dryer?
It depends. I you're efficient at taking the washing out of the machine as soon as it finishes, so it dosn't sit too long, and if you hang it carefully and thre's a breeze, you get rid of a lot of the wrinkles. I tend to find that I can get away without ironing much, but there are some things such as cotton or linen shirts which need ironing whatever you do. I often put things on coathangers and hang the hanger from the washing line, as this helps reduce wrinkles for shirts and dresses.

That said, I hate ironing so I try to buy low-maintenance clothes, most of the time.
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I have more questions, but I'll stop there. It'd be super nice to be able to dry things in my apartment, so I'm really curious about anyone's answers.

Morrigan

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #42 on: August 09, 2012, 09:47:00 AM »
Michigangander here.  Mother and grandmother always hang them out in the nice weather.

I've taken to hanging mine out in spring/summer/fall (when it's not too cold for me).  I do have a dryer for when there's bad weather or it's winter.  Gas bill has gone down dramatically since I started hanging them out.

Sophia

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #43 on: August 09, 2012, 10:34:26 AM »
...-How long do clothes typically take to dry indoors? What about outdoors? I know weather plays a huge factor in this, but I'm just looking for an approximation....

At least for me, when I hang my clothes indoors I put them on the hanger wet, then I hang them on the rod.  So, it isn't like if I hung them on a clothesline.  They do seem to last a lot longer that way.  I smooth out the fabric as I am hanging them up and for my nice clothes I try to get to the washer as soon as it is done.  It doesn't seem to be the washing that puts in wrinkles, it seems to be sitting there wet that does it. 

Venus193

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Re: Clothes lines
« Reply #44 on: August 09, 2012, 11:23:47 AM »
Dawbs, I can imagine.

I live in a 1BR walkup, so I'm stuck with an outside laundromat and dryers.