Author Topic: Is This Really So Strange?  (Read 7916 times)

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Hmmmmm

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #15 on: August 08, 2012, 01:10:40 PM »
Thank you notes were standard practice when I was interviewing for jobs.  As an employer I'd say about 50% of them come via email now which is fine too.  But a follow up thank you should always occur.

DaDancingPsych

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #16 on: August 08, 2012, 01:46:41 PM »
I think it would only be considered "sucking up" if the position is to clean up an office that is not running smoothly. Because then you would not be impressed and it would look like you were just saying that to get the job. (In that case, I would suggest that you express your interest in fixing things or state skills that may assist with that.) I have no doubt that your thank you note came across as sincere.

artk2002

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #17 on: August 08, 2012, 02:18:36 PM »
Two weeks ago I interviewed for a position at another university and am waiting to here if I got the job (they move slowly due to the number of applications they get for each position).

I mentioned to a friend that I thought the interview went well and that I had sent a thank you card to the two gentlemen who interviewed me (one was the department chief, the other was VP of the division).  In the cards I simply thanked them for meeting with me, expressed that I was impressed with the department (not an exaggeration, I was impressed) and hoped I'd be lucky enough to secure the position.

Friend thought this was the oddest thing she'd ever heard.  She told me she hoped they wouldn't see the cards as me "sucking up" to try to further my chances.  I've done this before with other job interviews, but now I'm wondering if this was inappropriate.

It's not strange. Furthermore, what's wrong with doing something reasonable that might improve your chances? Everybody else has the same opportunity to do it, so it's not unfair to the other candidates.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. -Mark Twain

Alpacas

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #18 on: August 08, 2012, 02:51:26 PM »
Just to add my 2 cents.

Where i am from this would indeed be strange.

learningtofly

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #19 on: August 08, 2012, 02:52:58 PM »
Not strange.  I was trained to write them although I know not everyone does.  I like to have them done in 24 hours although if I meet with more than 5 people that can stretch to 48 hours.  It's a chance to remind them who you are and sometimes emphasize your strengths.

Hillia

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #20 on: August 08, 2012, 02:56:02 PM »
I graduated from college in 1985 and have always written thank you notes.  I don't know if they've ever been the deciding factor but I have had interviewers mention that mine was the only one they received.

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Margo

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #21 on: August 08, 2012, 02:59:53 PM »
BeagleMommy, is your friend from (or has she worked) outside the USA? I'm from the UK and this is definitely not usual here.

Also, to me, there is a difference between writing a short thank you note or letter, and sending a card. Is it possible she saw a card as being too informal / less professional?

thunderroad

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #22 on: August 08, 2012, 03:51:05 PM »
It's a secretarial position.  In high school, those of us in the secretarial track were required to take a business etiquette course and the TY note for an interview was considered standard practice.  That was nearly 30 years ago so I wasn't sure if I've become an "old fogey"  ;D.



Sadly, to some extent, I think we both have become so, but I think it's to your credit, BeagleMommy.

Lo these many years ago when I graduated from law school, it was drilled into us that thank you notes were required for all interviews, and that the lack of a note, or a poorly drafted or misspelled note could doom our chances at a job.  These days, I receive very few such notes from the students I interview; I think they have been taught that the notes are not required or are old fashioned.  I was intrigued that some recent students are still taught to send thank you notes.

DavidH

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #23 on: August 08, 2012, 04:00:17 PM »
I've always written a note either on a blank card or stationary, tailored to the job.  I haven't ever seen a card with a pre-written message, like a birthday card for example.  I'm assuming you mean a note written on a card, vs. the pre-written type.  I would think a pre-written type would be odd, but not a negative if that makes sense.

When interviewing, a thank you card is a plus.  Not writing on isn't a deal breaker, but a strike against the candidate.  Misspellings or poor grammar is a bigger strike than not sending one, since in my mind, if you don't care about the impression you leave before you are hired, how sloppy will you be afterwards?

Moray

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #24 on: August 08, 2012, 04:15:58 PM »
BeagleMommy, is your friend from (or has she worked) outside the USA? I'm from the UK and this is definitely not usual here.

Also, to me, there is a difference between writing a short thank you note or letter, and sending a card. Is it possible she saw a card as being too informal / less professional?

I wondered that, too. In the US, it's definitely common practice.
Utah

sweetonsno

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #25 on: August 08, 2012, 04:23:48 PM »
I hadn't thought of the US/non-US aspect. I'm in the US. I don't think it's strange to send a thank-you. In fact, I think it's great. Unfortunately, I think it is unusual, especially among younger people. I've received only two hand-written thank-you cards from people in my age bracket (I'm 30 now), and many of my older friends and family members have commented on the fact that I'm the only one who does send hand-written cards. It's such an easy thing to do, and so many people appreciate it. I say it's never wrong to write a thank-you letter or car.

Cami

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #26 on: August 08, 2012, 05:05:24 PM »
I don't think it's odd, but in my experience it is:

1. Unusual
2. Ineffective

I have never once been in a hiring situation in which the thank you note made a ny difference whatsoever.  I will add that women may notice the presence of the note, while men make no notice of it. But I've never seen either gender give any weight to it in their hiring choices.

We just interviewed for an entry-level position. Only one person sent a thank you note. The thank you note will make no difference.  I will tell you that what did make a difference was the way she was dressed when she delivered the note -- she was wearing grubby clothes showing evidence she'd spent the morning gardening and her shorts were half-way up her keister. Her note and resume went right into the trash the second she left and thirty seconds after that, she received a "Thanks, but no thanks" email.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2012, 05:10:39 PM by Cami »

Sapphire

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #27 on: August 08, 2012, 05:17:58 PM »
Like Margo, I am from the UK and was wondering if this is a US/ non-US thing? I have never heard of sending thank you notes for interviews, and I graduated and have worked in a number if jobs since 1985 - and been both interviewer and interviewee.

In fact, here, a thank you note for an interview would be most odd, and likely seen as sucking up.

I ind this forum very interesting when it flags up differences between the cultures either side of he pond. Should I get a thank you note in the future from a candidate hailing from the US, I will know to view it differently.

MacadamiaNut

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #28 on: August 08, 2012, 05:30:10 PM »
It's interesting the differences.

Just a quick addition to my first post: When I'm interviewing myself, I am partial to the thank you email.  It puts my email address into the person's email address book (in case it wasn't already in there) and it gives them an opportunity to respond, if they so wish, much more easily.  Then based on their response, I can judge their interest.  It also presents to them again my contact information, which they can easily search (instead of looking for my resume).  Lots of plusses about the thank you email, IMO.

For those across the pond, what are your thoughts about the thank you email?  I will soon be interviewing with someone who hails from overseas, I'm not sure how long they've been here in Canada, so I'm just wondering if I should adjust or not.
Paperweights, for instance - has anyone ever established what, when, and why
paper has to be weighed down? ::) ~Don Aslett

QueenofAllThings

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Re: Is This Really So Strange?
« Reply #29 on: August 08, 2012, 05:44:18 PM »
Not only is it fine, but an excellent opportunity to follow up.

"Thank you for mentioning xyz website to me; I found it very informative".

"I enjoyed our discussion about the department's long-term goals, and ..."

etc ...