Author Topic: Car boot sales  (Read 1693 times)

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guihong

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Re: Car boot sales
« Reply #15 on: June 19, 2014, 09:45:35 AM »
Just for trivia, "Flea Markets" are named after a Paris market that sold second-hand things that could contain fleas  ;D.

I live in the mid-South.  We generally have three kinds of sales:

1. Garage sales/rummage sales-usually a one-off thing, but there are a few huge annual rummage sales, even multi-state :).  Many of these are held by churches or charities as a fund raiser.  A favorite activity on Saturday mornings is to cruise around watching for sales like a pack of raptors. 

2. The aforementioned flea markets-these are more permanent and are usually held a few times a month in a large building. Vendors rent a booth for their things.  I have also seen the outdoors kind. 

3.  I've also seen, and shopped at, estate sales.  Sometimes, when a person dies or goes into a rest home, the contents of the house are sold off (after sentimental things are divided, of course).  I've always felt a little guilty doing this, but there are often very good quality furnitures for a bargain.



lowspark

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Re: Car boot sales
« Reply #16 on: June 19, 2014, 10:26:06 AM »
Just for trivia, "Flea Markets" are named after a Paris market that sold second-hand things that could contain fleas  ;D.


I didn't know that! Interesting!

Your mention of multi state garage sales reminded me of this sale:
http://www.127sale.com/

It's not that close to me but one of these days, I'm going to go!

Sophia

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Re: Car boot sales
« Reply #17 on: June 19, 2014, 11:12:20 AM »
I like garage sales, but I don't drive around for them.  Usually this is how it works.

(Driving home with 3-year-old daughter in the car.   Daughter knows that a nap will happen when we get home.  I see a garage sale sign)
Me:  "What do you think of the idea of going to a garage sale?"
DD thinks to herself:  That means nap is delayed.
DD says: "Garage sale!  I want to go to a garage sale!"

I have seen something called a Field Sale in a small town.  It sounds like a boot sale.  People pay $5 and get a folding table where they can display their stuff for sale.  I am pretty sure there isn't a charge to shop.  I think the idea is sort of a replacement for garage sales.  That people will sell more of their stuff if there is enough stuff for sale to attract a lot of people. 

Speaking of service-oriented.  I don't think that selling out of the boot of your car or on the grass would be acceptable in America.  We expect the stuff to be displayed in some fashion.  Although, having a box labeled "Everything $1" is acceptable.  Thinking about it, even if I saw something I wanted in a car boot, I wouldn't buy it.  It has connotations of stolen merchandise. 

Thipu1

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Re: Car boot sales
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2014, 11:36:29 AM »
In our Brooklyn neighborhood people may have back yards but they don't have front yards.  Instead, we have stoops.  As a result, stoop sales are the norm and May to October is the prime season. Every weekend you'll be walking down the street and see chalked notices of these sales on the sidewalk directing you to the house. The stoops may be ten steps high and make a wonderful display area for merchandise.   

Houses of worship and schools often have indoor flea markets around the holidays.  These are stocked by donations from parents and parishioners.  Often, local artisans will have a booth and donate a portion of their sales to the organization.   

One Middle School in our neighborhood held a flea market in their playground every Saturday and Sunday for years.  Admission was free and many vendors had a table on the sidewalk outside but also sold from their vans.   

ITSJUSTME

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Re: Car boot sales
« Reply #19 on: June 19, 2014, 11:51:22 AM »
Never saw a car boot sale in Chicago but have seen them on TV (a UK show called Life Laundry).

The closest I can think of was the old Maxwell Street market in Chicago.  DH works in printing and said someone used to come by for scrap paper which had been cut off - this was usually paper & card of all weights, colors & sizes.  He dumped it all in the trunk (boot) of his car,  drove to Maxwell Street and opened it up.  Anyone could dig in and grab handfuls & fill a bag for a quarter or a dollar or whatever it was he charged.

Others might have a trunk full of socks, or cotton gloves or other oddments.

edited typo
« Last Edit: June 19, 2014, 01:43:14 PM by ITSJUSTME »

TootsNYC

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Re: Car boot sales
« Reply #20 on: June 19, 2014, 01:03:45 PM »
We have them, actually--google "trunk sale" (bcs we call it the trunk).

You'll find a lot of "junk in the trunk" phrasing, actually.

They're not widespread (yet), but they're there.

I like the idea--it'd be a lot less work than a flea market!

(Note that the phrase "trunk sale" is more commonly used for a sale of a manufacturer's samples--from the sample trunk the salesman carried around with him. So bridal stores will have a trunk sale of stuff by one manufacturer, etc.)
« Last Edit: June 19, 2014, 01:06:54 PM by TootsNYC »

veryfluffy

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Re: Car boot sales
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2014, 01:11:18 PM »

Speaking of service-oriented.  I don't think that selling out of the boot of your car or on the grass would be acceptable in America.  We expect the stuff to be displayed in some fashion.  Although, having a box labeled "Everything $1" is acceptable.  Thinking about it, even if I saw something I wanted in a car boot, I wouldn't buy it.  It has connotations of stolen merchandise.

At a car boot sale, the stuff is not actually sold out of the boot of the car -- the car is just driven onto the selling field, and then the sellers unload and display the stuff on folding tables they've brought, or perhaps on tarpaulins laid on the ground if it is bigger stuff. They will often bring along clothes rails, although children's items are often just laid out.
   

Sophia

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Re: Car boot sales
« Reply #22 on: June 19, 2014, 08:48:42 PM »
That makes sense.  That picture sort of looked like like they were - that was where I got the idea. 

TootsNYC

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Re: Car boot sales
« Reply #23 on: June 19, 2014, 11:29:15 PM »
Here are "junk in your trunk sales" picture.

http://robertasrandom.blogspot.com/2012/09/junk-in-trunk-sale-was-great.html
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-oRm-NyVGOKw/UEsb4A0W5sI/AAAAAAAALqA/TV4koynnX-E/s1600/JunkinTrunk11.jpg

http://www.co.pierce.wa.us/index.aspx?NID=3196

http://www.waxahachietx.com/news/waxahachie/junk-in-the-trunk-packs-downtown-with-shoppers/article_43ee7298-e6d7-5b26-b21f-31bb67f7767b.html


In many of them, people are using the surface of their trunk (well, in one of them they're all vans or SUVs, or maybe pickups, so it's not really a trunk) as a shelf for some of their stuff. But since it's an organized thing, I wouldn't think most people would worry that this was stolen merchandise.

MurPl1

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Re: Car boot sales
« Reply #24 on: June 20, 2014, 10:33:36 PM »
We have a lot of Homeowner Association neighborhoods in our area.  Most of them limit garage sales to twice a year (spring/fall) on a date set by the HOA.  The benefit is that it helps draw more people in than just the one offs happening on different weekends.  Usually there's more (better?) signage, the HOA coordinates the permits, and at least in our neighborhood we have someone who will buy balloons for the mailboxes so folks can easily identify homes with sales.

SoCalVal

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Re: Car boot sales
« Reply #25 on: June 22, 2014, 12:57:04 PM »
Are they a thing in America? It's always struck me as odd that the garage sale seems to be a bigger concept in a country that's so geared towards customer service, since the customers actually have to make an effort to drive around and find them.

Here, car boot sales can be huge.  They're usually held on Sunday mornings, but sometimes Saturdays. There are big ones in fields and smaller ones in town car parks, school grounds, etc. Sellers load up their cars and take their goods to the one place to sell and there can be hundreds of sellers at a time, which is great for the buyers. Sellers pay a fee to the organisers for the pitch (usually between 5 and 10 pounds) and there's usually a nominal fee for buyers of about 50p. Sometimes there's an early bird fee - if you pay the higher fee, you can go in at an earlier time (when there's still more stuff to buy), so it might be "1 before 7am" when all the sellers are still setting up. It's really common for buyers to hover around a car that's just arrived to see what's in there as it's being unloaded.

There are often food sellers on site - burger vans and the like. The culture is "turn up early, root through the stuff, haggle a lot, get it as cheap as you can" - if someone's offering something for 10, it's usual to offer 5 then agree somewhere in the middle.  Sales usually last a few hours - say 7am until 1pm - but most people in search of serious bargains will be there during the first hour or two. Sellers usually start discounting after a couple of hours because they don't want to take it all home again and may even start packing up early. They very rarely last until their stated end time.

I love a car boot sale. I've furnished entire houses for peanuts through buying stuff there. I like that it's all in one place; I'm not sure if I could be bothered to drive around to lots of different houses. You see the very occasional garage sale here but they haven't really caught on like the boot sale has.

I've never heard of car boot sales -- flea markets and swap meets, yes.

I don't see garage sales here as odd as you're expecting that people at home are going to place the same importance on customer service as commercial industries.  The "convenience" of a garage sale for the one holding it is not having to leave home, and the garage sale culture is such that one is expected to have to go to the location to attend the sale.  Also, for "catch-all" locations, the seller often has to pay for a booth or spot (while they might be required to get a permit for a garage sale, I don't know how many people actually do that or know they are supposed to -- I certainly didn't).  In my neighborhood, we all have decent-sized front yards so I could see easily having garage sales here (and there was, actually, a neighborhood-wide garage sale a few months ago, which meant each participating home held their own sale on their own property but one ad went out for the area). 



baglady

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Re: Car boot sales
« Reply #26 on: June 25, 2014, 05:59:53 PM »
Northeastern U.S. here. Flea markets (the closest equivalent of car boot sales in the U.K.) have changed a lot since I was a youngster in the 1960s/early '70s. My parents used to exhibit at a large flea market in southern New Hampshire that was mostly antiques dealers selling glass and china, old tools, antique toys and such. There were also food booths and some specialty vendors -- one I remember was a fellow who would draw portraits on site. I never saw folks selling the sort of plain old secondhand stuff (used clothes, toys, etc.) that you'd see at a garage/yard/tag sale.

The flea markets I attended in the '80s were mostly populated by vendors selling new but cheap goods -- hats, key rings, T-shirts, costume jewelry, etc.

Around here these days, we have a lot of village-wide and town-wide garage sales, where people sell their own stuff from their own garages/yards and keep the proceeds. You can register your sale with the organizers (sometimes for a fee, sometimes not), and it gets put on the map they give out to visitors. Or you can just set up your own sale on town-wide sale weekend and let people find it as they drive around.

Or you can simply have your own sale on whatever day you choose. Hard-core "garage salers" check the classified ads and drive around to the sales they see advertised.

Churches and other organizations have rummage sales for which they solicit donations of goods to sell. The money goes to the church/organization. I used to volunteer with an organization that did a sale like this, and it was a nightmare! We solicited donations from the community, and everyone brought over the stuff they didn't sell at their *own* garage sales. (Translation: lots of junk nobody wants.) Fortunately, there was a charity thrift shop that offered to cart our unsold merchandise away. Otherwise, we would have had to pay more to get rid of it than we made on the sale.
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