Author Topic: Regional sayings  (Read 55100 times)

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WillyNilly

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #285 on: November 09, 2012, 08:40:53 AM »
I call them "granny carts" too even though in my area they are very common among all ages. DH and I use ours at least weekly if not multiple times a week - to bring the laundry down to the [apartment building communial] laundry room, to bring the groceries in (about 1 block and 6 flights from the building parking lot), etc.

Emwithme - I'd call that a dinner roll.

jmarvellous

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #286 on: November 09, 2012, 11:55:58 AM »
Emwithme, that is just a roll.

We don't have many of those 2-wheeled things, but they're just carts.

What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.

WillyNilly

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #287 on: November 09, 2012, 12:03:14 PM »
What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.

One of these (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All-terrain_vehicle)? Either a "quad" or an "ATV", although if someone called it a "4x4" I'd know what they meant.

Hmmmmm

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #288 on: November 09, 2012, 12:05:05 PM »
What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.

One of these (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All-terrain_vehicle)? Either a "quad" or an "ATV", although if someone called it a "4x4" I'd know what they meant.

ATV's or 4 wheelers.

I always refer to the two wheeled carts as "pull carts".

Redsoil

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #289 on: November 10, 2012, 02:55:18 AM »
Quadrunner, quadbike or just the quad.  Much prefer 2 wheels.  Way too many farm accidents with people thinking they're somehow "safe" because it has 4 wheels and they then try to do silly things, like go up the side of a steep hill at a bad angle etc.  Handy things in the mud, though.
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scotcat60

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #290 on: November 10, 2012, 10:42:16 AM »
Kick the bucket
Drop off your twig

Euphemisms for dying in the UK

To be out of pocket means that  you have paid out for something but got no return e;g if someone has asked you for a loan, you have given it but not been paid back, you are out of pocket, because your money has not been replaced.

Yup. Thole to rhyme with hole. According to Merriam Webster it's derived from Old English tholian and is very old but now only used in 'the corners of England's northern dialects' but it's still in use in Scotland and Ulster.

My Dad was a Scot and used this term. It is used in Robert Burns's poem"The Cottar's Saturday Night" the peom refers to the cottar (cottager) having to thole the factors "snash" ie. put up with the rudeness of the landlord's agent
« Last Edit: November 10, 2012, 10:52:38 AM by scotcat60 »

katycoo

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #291 on: November 18, 2012, 06:02:25 PM »

A "tallboy" is not furniture at all to me, its a 16oz beer (as opposed to a standard 12oz). "Amy and I got a 6 pack of tallboys for the softball game."  Unless its a Fosters, then its an "oilcan". A 40oz beer is simply a "forty" - as in "there were a bunch of rowdy teens drinking forties in the park last night, I had to call the cops."

And I too have used/heard "pan out" as a question or a negative, but never an affirmative.

And of course drawer and door rhyme! With draw being *almost* indistinguishable from drawer.

Why is Fosters an oilcan?

I always assumed because the fat can resembles a can of motor oil, but honestly I don't know.  I just know if someone say "hey while you are the store could you pick me up an oilcan?" or "we were tailgating with a few oilcans" they mean a can of Foster's beer.

Having just been in the states and seen one, I have now worked this out.  I had no idea that Fosters and a couple of other brands were sold in larger cans.  They aren't here.

katycoo

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #292 on: November 18, 2012, 06:02:36 PM »
What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.

Quadbike

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #293 on: November 18, 2012, 07:22:39 PM »
ATVs up here (All Terrain Vehicle).  We still have an ATC - All Terrain Cycle.  They haven't been available for almost 30 years because the were deemed too dangerous.  A number of the rolled over and the operator was hurt/killed.  But it was really more operator error than anything.

We call it the buggy.   :)
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JonGirl

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #294 on: November 18, 2012, 09:16:24 PM »
What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.

Quadbike


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jmarvellous

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #295 on: November 18, 2012, 09:40:45 PM »
What do you call those 4-wheeled, motorized dangerous things people use to hop around and play in rural areas? I have heard tons of names.

Quadbike

Funny, I have heard three or more terms for this, but never that one.

I think 4-wheeler is most common here.

Sharnita

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #296 on: November 18, 2012, 10:27:37 PM »
I've heard ATV and 4-Wheeler

Elfmama

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #297 on: November 19, 2012, 12:40:47 AM »
Back on the first page, someone used 'dirt nap' as a euphemism/synonym for 'dying'.  Rather surprised me, because I've always heard it to mean 'got knocked out/down.' The dirt-napper is just lying there in the dirt.
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jmarvellous

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #298 on: November 19, 2012, 09:38:40 AM »
Back on the first page, someone used 'dirt nap' as a euphemism/synonym for 'dying'.  Rather surprised me, because I've always heard it to mean 'got knocked out/down.' The dirt-napper is just lying there in the dirt.

I wonder if this is more of a difference of interpretation than a difference of meaning. That is, no one took the time to explain it in detail to you, so you assumed a more literal meaning, or you did so because people around you also had. I say this because I was pretty certain, up to now, that there was just one metaphorical meaning for the phrase -- "napping" in the dirt = dead and buried.

Elfmama

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #299 on: November 19, 2012, 05:03:29 PM »
Back on the first page, someone used 'dirt nap' as a euphemism/synonym for 'dying'.  Rather surprised me, because I've always heard it to mean 'got knocked out/down.' The dirt-napper is just lying there in the dirt.

I wonder if this is more of a difference of interpretation than a difference of meaning. That is, no one took the time to explain it in detail to you, so you assumed a more literal meaning, or you did so because people around you also had. I say this because I was pretty certain, up to now, that there was just one metaphorical meaning for the phrase -- "napping" in the dirt = dead and buried.
I don't think so.  The only contexts in which I've heard it used are those where there is actual possibility of someone being knocked out.  SCA sword-and-shield fighters, for instance.  "Make him take a dirt-nap" is the usual phrasing, although since we pretend that a fighter is "dead" when he is defeated, it's possible that I did misunderstand. 
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