Author Topic: Regional sayings  (Read 50868 times)

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Margo

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #345 on: May 27, 2014, 09:00:57 AM »
In British English, 'right now' would be 'now this minute' - it has a definite sense of urgency to it.
'now' would be,  now, but less urgent / immediate than 'right now'
'just now' would be something which has happened in the [very] recent past.
'now now' is not a time frame at all - it is a mild warning - something you might say if you were interrupting someone who is just about to say something inappropriate, or it might be mildly questioning (a sort of 'whats all this about', to a child, maybe)

Thipu1

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #346 on: May 27, 2014, 09:59:20 AM »
In British English, 'right now' would be 'now this minute' - it has a definite sense of urgency to it.
'now' would be,  now, but less urgent / immediate than 'right now'
'just now' would be something which has happened in the [very] recent past.
'now now' is not a time frame at all - it is a mild warning - something you might say if you were interrupting someone who is just about to say something inappropriate, or it might be mildly questioning (a sort of 'whats all this about', to a child, maybe)

That would be the exact meanings for those terms here in NYC as well. 

Hmmmmm

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #347 on: May 27, 2014, 10:00:31 AM »
In Southern Africa, we have the incredibly confusing time spans of "Now", "Now now", "Right now" and "Just now".

"Now" actually means soon (like in the next couple of minutes).
"Now Now" means fairly soon, but later than "Now".
"Right Now" means kinda soon, but later than "Now Now".
"Just Now" means later (or maybe never depending on mood).

So if you say you're going to do something "Right now" it could take a while to get to it.

And now I've typed the word "Now" so many times it's stopped looking like a sensible word and just looks like gibberish.



There's also the lovely phrase "Yah well no fine". Means quite a few things (or nothing at all), all depending entirely on tone.

Person1: "Sally is going to be an hour late."
Person2: "Yah well no fine".  <-- in an annoyed tone, it means "Ugh Seriously!?", in a relaxed tone it mean "Oh well, nevermind, she'll get here when she gets here".

Interesting. I would have thought the opposite definitions. I used to use now, now with my kids to mean "do it this very second" not their definition of now which could mean when they stopped what they were doing and got to it.

Just now is also a regional phrase I grew up with to mean something had just occurred. "He just now drove up."

I'd have always been confused in S.A.

Elfmama

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #348 on: May 27, 2014, 04:45:48 PM »
One from my family in Oklahoma: "It don't make me no nevermind."

I think I'll let the Aussies guess this one.  >:D

It doesn't matter?
It's a tossup  between this and "I don't care."  :) 
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Danika

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #349 on: May 27, 2014, 05:48:56 PM »
I've heard that "quite good" in Britain means mediocre or not very good. In the U.S. it means something that's better than average, so a little better than good, but not fantastic.

mime

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #350 on: May 27, 2014, 06:14:48 PM »
I've heard that "quite good" in Britain means mediocre or not very good. In the U.S. it means something that's better than average, so a little better than good, but not fantastic.

I had a British boss for a while. Now I'm trying to remember if he ever used that phrase for my work!

I always smiled when he would refer to my numbers as "bang on". It sounded so much more forceful than "they're right".

Margo

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #351 on: May 28, 2014, 03:58:16 AM »
I've heard that "quite good" in Britain means mediocre or not very good. In the U.S. it means something that's better than average, so a little better than good, but not fantastic.

Yes, I think in most conexts 'quite good' = less good than 'good'.

On he other hand, 'not bad' generally means better than 'good' :)

Mental Magpie

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #352 on: May 28, 2014, 04:10:50 PM »
I've heard that "quite good" in Britain means mediocre or not very good. In the U.S. it means something that's better than average, so a little better than good, but not fantastic.

Yes, I think in most conexts 'quite good' = less good than 'good'.

On he other hand, 'not bad' generally means better than 'good' :)

Here (US), quite good and not bad are pretty much equals.
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jilly

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #353 on: May 28, 2014, 04:22:41 PM »
Apparently soon used to mean now, but people kept saying they'd do something soon and then doing it later so often the meaning shifted  ::) you can see the same thing happening with now, people add qualifiers for urgency.

anyone else understand nammet?

Oh and as it's nearly holiday season, grockle?
« Last Edit: May 28, 2014, 04:35:36 PM by jilly »

perpetua

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #354 on: May 28, 2014, 06:09:12 PM »
Oh and as it's nearly holiday season, grockle?

Or, depending which side of the Tamar you grew up on: Emmet :)

Grockles were the bane of my life growing up... so yes, perfectly well understood here!

(This one's even regional within the UK, I think).

Elfmama

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #355 on: May 28, 2014, 07:23:40 PM »
Oh and as it's nearly holiday season, grockle?

Or, depending which side of the Tamar you grew up on: Emmet :)

Grockles were the bane of my life growing up... so yes, perfectly well understood here!

(This one's even regional within the UK, I think).
Well, this is a grackle.



A big, noisy bird that congregates in large messy flocks and makes a nuisance of itself.   Is there any similarity? ;)
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jilly

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #356 on: May 29, 2014, 02:59:57 AM »
Oh and as it's nearly holiday season, grockle?

Or, depending which side of the Tamar you grew up on: Emmet :)

Grockles were the bane of my life growing up... so yes, perfectly well understood here!

(This one's even regional within the UK, I think).

I have a suspicion that nammet is so regional in the uk it's limited to one county and going out of use :(  I'm actually on the isle of wight but I know there are several towns in Australia and I think the US named after towns here so I thought there maybe spread some regional sayings too :).

perpetua

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #357 on: May 29, 2014, 03:19:43 AM »
Oh and as it's nearly holiday season, grockle?

Or, depending which side of the Tamar you grew up on: Emmet :)

Grockles were the bane of my life growing up... so yes, perfectly well understood here!

(This one's even regional within the UK, I think).
Well, this is a grackle.



A big, noisy bird that congregates in large messy flocks and makes a nuisance of itself.   Is there any similarity? ;)

Ohhhhhhhh yes :)

oz diva

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #358 on: May 29, 2014, 04:34:15 AM »
To my Scottish husband grockle is little bits n pieces of whatever. We buy small presents for the kids before Xmas and he calls that grockle.

Victoria

Redsoil

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #359 on: May 29, 2014, 10:35:44 AM »
Those outside Australia can try their hand at this one - I'm interested to see if other countries use it at all.

"Bangin' like a dunny door."
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