Author Topic: Regional sayings  (Read 54652 times)

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Danika

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #390 on: June 06, 2014, 02:05:21 PM »
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

the reason is that back in the days of wooden ships, you relieved yourself over the side of the ship, and the designated place was right at the front of the ship, next to the figurehead, so it was purely descriptive, and the name stuck even after the location changed.

Interesting! Thanks for telling us. That's so strange that they would go at the front of the ship, instead of off the back of the ship. It brings to mind another saying I have seldom heard, but laugh every time I hear it: "pissin' into the wind."

Margo

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #391 on: June 06, 2014, 03:40:38 PM »
I thought that, but in a sailing ship, he wind would be coming from behind (ideally) so apparently anything unpleasant or smelly was placed as far forward as possible, and the captain got the nice big cabin at the stern.


nolechica

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #392 on: June 08, 2014, 05:37:44 AM »
I went to a college in northern New Hampshire, and "emmett" was the local slang (among students and townies) for people from New Hampshire. Vermonters were called "newts."

I currently live near Lake George, N.Y., where the locals refer to the tourists as "tourons" -- a portmanteau of "tourist" and "moron." Not all tourists are tourons, though -- just the boorish ones.

LOL, I rather like touron.

miranova

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #393 on: June 26, 2014, 08:01:15 AM »
I was fascinated reading about nachos=just chips because my husband's entire family is from PA and I encountered this recently.  For our Super Bowl party my MIL asked what she could bring and I suggested nachos.  She showed up with a bag of chips.  I was mystified.  My husband explained that that's what nachos means to her.  I had no idea it was a PA thing but that explains it!

There are many things my husband and his family say that must be regional to PA (or maybe not but they are the only people I ever hear saying them).

Hamburg for ground beef
mile an hour for miles per hour.  For instance "I was going 50 mile an hour back there".
Someone isn't a bus driver, they "drive bus".  This one was so hard for me to get used to.
Similarly, my husband needs to "mow lawn".  Not "mow the lawn".  He drops words in other places too.  "This invoice needs paid" instead of "needs to be paid" all the time.  After meeting and listening to his family I realized they all do it so it came from either them specifically or that regional area.
They pronounce creek "crick".
They pronounce "roof" like "ruff" and "root" like "rut".
When my MIL buys furniture for a whole room she calls it an outfit.  Like "come look at the bedroom outfit we found".

I am not making fun, I just find it fascinating to listen to when he is around his family.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2014, 08:05:08 AM by miranova »

iridaceae

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #394 on: June 26, 2014, 08:22:17 AM »
My father is from west central Illinois- Quncy- and her says crick for creek.

Thipu1

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #395 on: June 26, 2014, 10:54:16 AM »
Here in Brooklyn, nachos involve at least chips and melted cheese.  That's the economy version.  A deluxe variety can also include refried beans, salsa, sour cream and perhaps even chili meat.  A good plate of nachos can be a whole meal. 

I'd be puzzled if someone said they were bringing nachos and showed up with only a bag of chips. 

Danika

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #396 on: June 26, 2014, 04:42:16 PM »
He drops words in other places too.  "This invoice needs paid" instead of "needs to be paid" all the time.

I live in the central U.S. I've heard this from time to time. It drives me nuts! And when I ask the person why they do that, they always reply "I don't do that. I don't know what you're talking about." I think I even mentioned this type of speech in the EHell thread Grammar and spellling that make you twitch.

lowspark

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #397 on: June 30, 2014, 10:58:12 AM »
Here in Brooklyn, nachos involve at least chips and melted cheese.  That's the economy version.  A deluxe variety can also include refried beans, salsa, sour cream and perhaps even chili meat.  A good plate of nachos can be a whole meal. 

I'd be puzzled if someone said they were bringing nachos and showed up with only a bag of chips.

Yeah, nachos, at minimum, are chips topped with cheese. They have misunderstood the meaning if they think it just means chips. "Chips" just means chips.

Per dictionary.com:


na·cho

noun, plural na·chos. Mexican Cookery. 
a snack or appetizer consisting of a small piece of tortilla topped with cheese, hot peppers, etc., and broiled.

jmarvellous

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #398 on: June 30, 2014, 11:02:41 AM »
Here in Brooklyn, nachos involve at least chips and melted cheese.  That's the economy version.  A deluxe variety can also include refried beans, salsa, sour cream and perhaps even chili meat.  A good plate of nachos can be a whole meal. 

I'd be puzzled if someone said they were bringing nachos and showed up with only a bag of chips.

Yeah, nachos, at minimum, are chips topped with cheese. They have misunderstood the meaning if they think it just means chips. "Chips" just means chips.

Per dictionary.com:


na·cho

noun, plural na·chos. Mexican Cookery. 
a snack or appetizer consisting of a small piece of tortilla topped with cheese, hot peppers, etc., and broiled.


Since I was the first to post this thing about nachos just being chips, and this is the regional sayings thread, I think it's pretty clear that what's "wrong" everywhere else is reasonably easily understood in PA.

The first time I made nachos, as we understand them, for my PA-reared husband, he said something like, "I didn't know you meant fancy nachos! Wow!" When his mom serves "nachos" for a snack, it's chips and salsa or another dip.

lowspark

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #399 on: June 30, 2014, 02:34:30 PM »
Ok, I give. I didn't mean to offend.

So, just wondering, do they ever offer nachos as a dish on a menu? Or is it called something else when they mean chips topped with cheese, etc.?

jmarvellous

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #400 on: June 30, 2014, 02:43:27 PM »
I think if nachos were on a menu, they'd be 'real' nachos. Chips would be chips.

I honestly think it's a small regional quirk that is quite outdated. The only reason my husband says it is because his mom did, and I haven't seen it in a store or anything. I posted it here because I wondered if anyone else in the world did that or if it was just a family thing.

I wasn't offended, I promise. I just thought it was funny to dissect it in this way in a thread about mostly nonsense-if-taken-literally expressions.

lowspark

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #401 on: June 30, 2014, 03:15:46 PM »
 ;D
Yeah, sometimes, when I'm reading the latest updates to a thread days (or weeks) after it was originally begun, I tend to forget what it was all about in the first place and just respond to the latest thread of the conversation or one particular comment instead of taking it in context.

Mental Magpie

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #402 on: June 30, 2014, 03:48:44 PM »
I think if nachos were on a menu, they'd be 'real' nachos. Chips would be chips.

I honestly think it's a small regional quirk that is quite outdated. The only reason my husband says it is because his mom did, and I haven't seen it in a store or anything. I posted it here because I wondered if anyone else in the world did that or if it was just a family thing.

I wasn't offended, I promise. I just thought it was funny to dissect it in this way in a thread about mostly nonsense-if-taken-literally expressions.

Oh, it's definitely a PA thing (as is calling Pennsylvania PA!). It was something that confused me as a child when we traveled. Nachos can be both just the chips and the chips with toppings. In the first, we're just shortening "nacho chips" to "nachos". In the second, we'll probably say "nachos and cheese".
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

AfleetAlex

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #403 on: June 30, 2014, 03:50:20 PM »
And then you have chips like Doritos, which bill themselves as nacho chips...you know, because we aren't confused enough already.  ;D

(I love Doritos. And nachos. And, well, chips!)
I have a chronic case of foot-in-mouth disease.

lowspark

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #404 on: June 30, 2014, 04:32:46 PM »
I think Doritos are nacho flavored although people usually don't say the word "flavored". They're suppose to taste like chips with cheese and Jalapeņos. Just as their taco (flavored) chips are supposed to taste like you're eating a taco.  ;)