Author Topic: Regional sayings  (Read 54628 times)

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oz diva

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Regional sayings
« on: August 20, 2012, 07:55:56 PM »
I was thinking about this when I heard that Phyllis Diller died at 95. Here we would say that she had a good innings. Do Americans say that? It's a cricketing term because 95 or 88 or 100 or a large number like that is a good amount of runs to make, ie a good score.


Victoria

Danika

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2012, 08:42:51 PM »
I've never heard of good innings. I live in Colorado. We have a saying here that I've never heard anywhere else in the US, but most people in my generation (born in the 1970s and 1980s) in Colorado are familiar with it. One of the words won't make it past the filter, so I'll try to get creative. The saying is "flipping a witch." Only the word isn't "witch." It means to make a U-turn. An example would be "Oh, I missed my exit. I'll flip a witch and go back."

camlan

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2012, 09:08:06 PM »
"She had a good innings" isn't used in the US, from what I can tell. I've sometimes heard, "He had a good long run," but I'm not sure how common that is.

What we do have is a variety of ways of saying that someone died, without actually using the word "die."

He passed
She passed on
She passed away
He was taken
She has breathed her last
He's gone to glory

Informal:
He kicked the bucket
She cashed in her chips
He bought the farm
She gave up the ghost

Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Danika

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2012, 09:52:39 PM »
camlan, my favorite saying for dying was in a Miami Vice episode when one of the characters said "He went on ahead." What?! I also snicker at the saying "He's pushing up daisies."

I like the number of sayings for vomiting:

He tossed his cookies
He harked
He hurled
He puked
He ralphed
Bowing to the porcelain god

Sharnita

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2012, 09:55:44 PM »
"She had a good innings" isn't used in the US, from what I can tell. I've sometimes heard, "He had a good long run," but I'm not sure how common that is.

What we do have is a variety of ways of saying that someone died, without actually using the word "die."

He passed
She passed on
She passed away
He was taken
She has breathed her last
He's gone to glory

Informal:
He kicked the bucket
She cashed in her chips
He bought the farm
She gave up the ghost

Also, among certain people "called home"

oz diva

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2012, 10:01:10 PM »
Danika we saying Praying to the porcelain god, but spewing is the most common, probably.

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violinp

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2012, 10:26:14 PM »
"She had a good innings" isn't used in the US, from what I can tell. I've sometimes heard, "He had a good long run," but I'm not sure how common that is.

What we do have is a variety of ways of saying that someone died, without actually using the word "die."

He passed
She passed on
She passed away
He was taken
She has breathed her last
He's gone to glory

Informal:
He kicked the bucket
She cashed in her chips
He bought the farm
She gave up the ghost

Also, among certain people "called home"

Gone home to Jesus
Fell asleep (in the arms of Jesus)
Pushing up daisies
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


Isometric

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2012, 10:57:00 PM »
My favourite Australian saying is "Not happy Jan" - to express mild annoyance/displeasure.

It originated from a TV ad a several years ago. (Yellow Pages, I think?)

Slartibartfast

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2012, 11:32:52 PM »
There's a great song by the Happy Schnopps Combo about regionalisms specific to the area of Wisconsin where I grew up:

I saw a man confused one day just wandering around
He said he needed help and that he was from outa town
He said "Sir I am thirsty and a beverage I do seek
But I do not understand the local language that you speak"

I says com'ere once...com'ere once...why don't you come by here
We'll have a hot tamale and a couple two tree beers      (<--- "hot tamales" = sloppy joes, and I tease my dad about "couple or two or three")
Or you can go dere by dat bubbler, but don't you budge in line   (<--- "bubbler" = drinking fountain, and "budge" = cut)
She's a nice day out, hey, an' so     (<--- the old guy who used to live next door to us said this ALL THE TIME.  Never did figure it out!)

The stranger said "I still don't grasp a word you people say
Are you from some foreign land or were you born this way?
It sounds a bit like English, and Polish and Chinese
So if you'd use sign language I'd appreciate it please"

I says com'ere once...com'ere once...why don't you come by here
We'll have a hot tamale and a couple two tree beers
Or you can go dere by dat bubbler, but don't you budge in line
She's a nice day out, ain' so

Com'ere once...com'ere once...for cry I come by here
We'll have a brat and kraut and den a couple two tree beers
Or you can go dere by dat bubbler, but don't you budge in line
She's a nice day out, ain' so
She's a nice day out, ain' so..oo..oo..oo..oo..oo.oo...

HEY ! !

oz diva

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2012, 11:33:54 PM »
I like Not Happy Jan, too and yes it was from Yellow Pages. A saying that has certainly outlived the campaign.

I don't actually know what sloppy joes are either.

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Slartibartfast

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2012, 11:41:26 PM »
I like Not Happy Jan, too and yes it was from Yellow Pages. A saying that has certainly outlived the campaign.

I don't actually know what sloppy joes are either.

Essentially a mixture of ground beef, tomato paste, and spices, mixed and cooked together, and served on a bun.  Here you can buy packets of sloppy joe spice mix which you just add to a pound of beef and a can of tomato paste, but you could probably find a recipe online specifying which spices to add.  I think they're delicious, but they are indeed sloppy if you overfill the buns!  They're a good cheap dinner and often used for cookouts/barbecues since it's easy to mix up a big batch and turn out many sandwiches very quickly.  They go well with cookout/barbecue food - chips/crisps, vegetables and dip, baked beans, potato salad, watermelon, etc.

Jape

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2012, 11:42:58 PM »
I love all our Aussie sayings.  We spent a night once 'educating' a Chinese friend.  The only one she knew was "Flat out like a lizard drinking"  We introduced her to some of the cruder ones as well as "As useless as an ashtray on a motorbike" and "As funny as a fart in a space-suit".  That last one is probably crude too, but pales into insignificance compared to some of them! 

Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #12 on: August 21, 2012, 03:57:32 AM »
To the vomiting vocabulary, the Scots and Irish can add 'boaking' (spelling variable), which implies vomiting with a degree of violence about it. So the baby who spits up the last mouthful of milk isn't boaking, but when you have food poisoning, and you lose everything you've eaten for about the last year, you are.

Sorry, but you did ask...

Iris

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2012, 04:59:04 AM »
For us, vomiting was "being on the big porcelain telephone to God".

I also use "Not Happy Jan". I can still picture the ad in my mind actually - definitely a successful campaign in terms of longevity. How good it was at advertising yellow pages I don't know :)

For an even older phone ad, who uses "That'll be the phone, Reg"?

"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

JonGirl

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2012, 06:38:31 AM »
For us, vomiting was "being on the big porcelain telephone to God".

I also use "Not Happy Jan". I can still picture the ad in my mind actually - definitely a successful campaign in terms of longevity. How good it was at advertising yellow pages I don't know :)

For an even older phone ad, who uses "That'll be the phone, Reg"?


I have an uncle named Reg, what do you think? lololol.
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