Author Topic: Regional sayings  (Read 52756 times)

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Pippen

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #120 on: August 29, 2012, 06:06:24 PM »
It's a trolley. Or a very cheap Taxi university students use to help get their drunk friends home from the pub.

Thipu1

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #121 on: August 29, 2012, 06:10:49 PM »
In NYC, it's a cart.

Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

Which brings up another question.  Here, we have two types of baskets in the supermarket.  There's the traditional type you hold in your hand or hang over your arm.  There's also a new type with wheels and a tall handle.  This kind you handle like a wheel-aboard.  Do you have different names for these?
That'd just be 'the ad' here (TX).

katycoo

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #122 on: August 29, 2012, 11:53:05 PM »
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

jmarvellous

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #123 on: August 30, 2012, 12:25:27 AM »
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

A catalog (no "ue" in the U.S.) is thicker than the little 4-10 page loose booklets I'm thinking of.

Mental Magpie

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #124 on: August 30, 2012, 12:45:01 AM »
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

A catalog (no "ue" in the U.S.) is thicker than the little 4-10 page loose booklets I'm thinking of.

Ditto....JC Penney's would have a catalog, but a local shopper would not.  That "Local Shopper", depending on where and for what, I would call either the local shopper or a coupon book.  I also pronounce that "q-PON" as in what you say when you say the name of the letter "q" and "pon" like the last three letters of "upon".

Dark Boyfriend had to chime in...he says, verbatim, "Poop* fire, save matches!" is something his very Texan grandmother has always said.  It's a general exclamation like, "Holy poop*!"

*The naughty word for poop.
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Iris

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #125 on: August 30, 2012, 02:20:37 AM »
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

A catalog (no "ue" in the U.S.) is thicker than the little 4-10 page loose booklets I'm thinking of.

In Australia they're all called catalogues. From the little 8 page thing you get in your letterbox or at the shops telling you what's on sale that week all the way up to the massive book that Ikea puts out each year. All catalogues.
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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #126 on: August 30, 2012, 05:18:29 AM »
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

A catalog (no "ue" in the U.S.) is thicker than the little 4-10 page loose booklets I'm thinking of.

In Australia they're all called catalogues. From the little 8 page thing you get in your letterbox or at the shops telling you what's on sale that week all the way up to the massive book that Ikea puts out each year. All catalogues.


This.
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Pippen

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #127 on: August 30, 2012, 07:33:07 AM »
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

A catalog (no "ue" in the U.S.) is thicker than the little 4-10 page loose booklets I'm thinking of.

In Australia they're all called catalogues. From the little 8 page thing you get in your letterbox or at the shops telling you what's on sale that week all the way up to the massive book that Ikea puts out each year. All catalogues.


This.

If anyone is heading to Ikea let me know. I have a list. We don't have it here and it annoys me greatly. I spacked out with the excitement last time I was in Melbourne and totally forgot to get all the stuff I went for.

Iris

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #128 on: August 30, 2012, 07:46:00 AM »
Yup, its a cart.  A "shopping cart" if being mentioned out of context (like when its on a the sidewalk or an apartment building super is using it to haul stuff) and just a "cart" when actually at the store "hey would you grab a cart while I grab the circular?"  (The "circular" being the weekly listings of sales & coupons... which is not circular at all but shaped like a newspaper ::) )

Yup, it's a circular here because it circulates. You find these things in your mailbox, stuffed into railings and lining the bottom of baskets in the grocery store.

That is a catalogue.

A catalog (no "ue" in the U.S.) is thicker than the little 4-10 page loose booklets I'm thinking of.

In Australia they're all called catalogues. From the little 8 page thing you get in your letterbox or at the shops telling you what's on sale that week all the way up to the massive book that Ikea puts out each year. All catalogues.


This.

If anyone is heading to Ikea let me know. I have a list. We don't have it here and it annoys me greatly. I spacked out with the excitement last time I was in Melbourne and totally forgot to get all the stuff I went for.

I'll probably head to the one in Sydney sometime in the next couple of months though I couldn't give you a firm date right now. Pm me if that is of any use.
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

Pippen

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #129 on: August 30, 2012, 05:34:22 PM »
Cheers but my brother is in Melbourne and I might pop over for a weekend in the next few months. I just totally lost focus the last time I was there and got loads of stuff I didn't need and none of the stuff I did.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #130 on: August 30, 2012, 07:17:51 PM »
When we can hear a baby has woken up from a nap or their night's sleep, we say "Another country heard from!"  I always heard my grandmother say it, and DH heard his gmother say it too.   For older people who are up from sleeping it's "Trouble's coming!" or "It's alive!" :)

When we're having someone over I say we're "Having company."

I got confused once when my Midwestern friend said she was going to be "out of pocket" as I always took it to mean "I'm paying for something out of my own pocket" (as opposed to using company funds or something like that) but she meant it as "I'm going out of town."  Now I've kinda picked up on it.
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White Lotus

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #131 on: August 30, 2012, 07:20:40 PM »
Hi, all.  Now official -- former lurker.  Where I am from, in the cold northwest, people DIE.  "Left us" or "Gone" are OK, but can be confusing. "Lost" as in, "I"m sorry you lost your uncle," works.  Otherwise, euphemisms aren't generally done around here: a bit too "refeened" to seem quite correct.  "Passed" sounds to me like they're playing bridge.   I'd put in a smiley, but I don't know how! 

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #132 on: August 30, 2012, 08:16:50 PM »
Just click on any of the ones that appear above the posting box.  Easy peasy.   :)

As for a saying, maybe someone could explain this one for me:  my aunt (who's passed  ;)) used to say 'Carry four' anytime somebody said the word for poop that starts with S.  No idea where it came from or what it means but since I can't ask her now...
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #133 on: August 30, 2012, 08:23:39 PM »
I'm from the US south.  I worked in Australia for a short time.  A common phrase to say to a coworker when leaving the office for the day is "Have a good one." as in have a good evening.  I later found out I was confusing lots of my Australian co- workers because they had no idea what the "one" was and why I insisted it be good.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #134 on: August 30, 2012, 11:42:46 PM »
When we can hear a baby has woken up from a nap or their night's sleep, we say "Another country heard from!"  I always heard my grandmother say it, and DH heard his gmother say it too.   For older people who are up from sleeping it's "Trouble's coming!" or "It's alive!" :)

When we're having someone over I say we're "Having company."

I got confused once when my Midwestern friend said she was going to be "out of pocket" as I always took it to mean "I'm paying for something out of my own pocket" (as opposed to using company funds or something like that) but she meant it as "I'm going out of town."  Now I've kinda picked up on it.

I'm in MD and I use out of pocket quite a bit.  Typically it is used when someone is going to be out of reach for a while.  So if I'm hiking, I'll say that I'll be "out of pocket" for most of the day since I'll be in the middle of nowhere with no/intermittent cell signal.  Or if I need to focus on my job and will not be checking emails or answering non-work phone calls, I'll be "out of pocket" for so many days until I get caught up.