Author Topic: Regional sayings  (Read 50626 times)

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hobish

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #210 on: September 14, 2012, 09:59:40 AM »
I got curious and googled it and it appears to have been used at least since the 70s but it was maybe restricted more to people involved with sports, especially basketball.

This is how I remember it starting.  Basketball players admitting to personal fouls.  I absolutely detest the term used to acknoweledge a mistake.  It sounds so ignorant to me.  What is so hard about saying "my fault" or "my mistake" or just sorry.

What is so hard about it? Using alternate phrases adds flavor and nuance to our language. It is limiting language that is "ignorant" not expanding it.

See, I don't know that I agree with this entirely. I personally like to flavour my speech with all sorts of 'mad' sayings that I've picked up from international friends or my students. Playing with language is one of my personal delights.

However in this *specific* case I am finding that a significant portion of the teenagers that I teach ONLY know "my bad". They would never, ever say "my fault" or another alternative because they just don't know they are available, or if they do they see them as archaic terms used only by teachers. Something about that bothers me. It feels too much like "ungood" I guess.

LOL, double ungood +2 ... It would be the same thing, though, if they only said "my fault" because they didn't know "my bad" was available. It isn't the phrase itself that is limiting language, it is the people using it.

- hobish, who could probably talk about the nuances of language all day until the thread was unrecognizable  :P
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jmarvellous

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #211 on: September 14, 2012, 12:12:35 PM »
I would know what someone meant if they used "dear" in the expensive sense, but I just don't hear it.

It does sound old-fashioned to me.

"Mind your own beeswax" isn't (exclusively) Irish. I think it's just slangy English language. Google seems to think it's 1930s slang, which would give it plenty of time to spread globally or close enough.

Iris

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #212 on: September 14, 2012, 05:11:23 PM »
*One thing I've noticed as a difference when speaking to friends from the UK is how they manage their contractions. For example, where I would say "I haven't walked the dog yet" they'd say "I've not walked the dog yet". Basically if there are two available contractions we will consistently choose differently.

*I am familiar with using the word "dear" to mean expensive, but mostly from my mother so perhaps it is a little old fashioned.

*Hobish - you make a good point. I will leave it at that though in order to keep the thread recognisable :)
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Slartibartfast

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #213 on: September 14, 2012, 05:22:53 PM »
My cell phone's gone walkabout.  Although nobody says "walkabout" around here.  In this case it's the right word, though!

Julian

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #214 on: September 15, 2012, 09:53:23 PM »
All hat, no cattle.

Never heard it until I moved to Houston.

Just another way of saying a person is all talk.

All mouth, no trousers.

More front than Myers.  (Myers is a large national chain of department stores).

I've frequently heard of 'camel-toe' inducing pants as mumble-pants.  PM if you really need to know why...  I'd probably get dinged for it here.

Is muffin-top common elsewhere besides Australia?  You know, over-tight lowrise pants, short midriff revealing top, muffin of extra flesh exposed over the pants?

'All over it like a fat kid on a cupcake' - I'm onto the issue. 

Dropped a clanger - can refer to either obnoxious gas passing or a big obvious mistake.




Mental Magpie

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #215 on: September 15, 2012, 10:06:36 PM »
All hat, no cattle.

Never heard it until I moved to Houston.

Just another way of saying a person is all talk.

All mouth, no trousers.

More front than Myers.  (Myers is a large national chain of department stores).

I've frequently heard of 'camel-toe' inducing pants as mumble-pants.  PM if you really need to know why...  I'd probably get dinged for it here.

Is muffin-top common elsewhere besides Australia?  You know, over-tight lowrise pants, short midriff revealing top, muffin of extra flesh exposed over the pants?

'All over it like a fat kid on a cupcake' - I'm onto the issue. 

Dropped a clanger - can refer to either obnoxious gas passing or a big obvious mistake.

Sometimes it is called cupcaking, too, and can also refer to a bra that does not fit properly and this results in cup spillage.

There are also many sayings mea ing "I'm onto the issue." "Like white on rice" is the first that comes to mind, and "Like flies on dung."
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Slartibartfast

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #216 on: September 16, 2012, 12:45:15 AM »
All hat, no cattle.

Never heard it until I moved to Houston.

Just another way of saying a person is all talk.

All mouth, no trousers.

More front than Myers.  (Myers is a large national chain of department stores).

I've frequently heard of 'camel-toe' inducing pants as mumble-pants.  PM if you really need to know why...  I'd probably get dinged for it here.

Is muffin-top common elsewhere besides Australia?  You know, over-tight lowrise pants, short midriff revealing top, muffin of extra flesh exposed over the pants?

'All over it like a fat kid on a cupcake' - I'm onto the issue. 

Dropped a clanger - can refer to either obnoxious gas passing or a big obvious mistake.

Sometimes it is called cupcaking, too, and can also refer to a bra that does not fit properly and this results in cup spillage.

There are also many sayings mea ing "I'm onto the issue." "Like white on rice" is the first that comes to mind, and "Like flies on dung."

I've heard muffin top, but not cupcaking.  And the bra thing I've more commonly heard as "quadraboob" (when the cup cuts each side in half . . . yeah, y'all know what I mean!)

Mental Magpie

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #217 on: September 16, 2012, 12:48:39 AM »
All hat, no cattle.

Never heard it until I moved to Houston.

Just another way of saying a person is all talk.

All mouth, no trousers.

More front than Myers.  (Myers is a large national chain of department stores).

I've frequently heard of 'camel-toe' inducing pants as mumble-pants.  PM if you really need to know why...  I'd probably get dinged for it here.

Is muffin-top common elsewhere besides Australia?  You know, over-tight lowrise pants, short midriff revealing top, muffin of extra flesh exposed over the pants?

'All over it like a fat kid on a cupcake' - I'm onto the issue. 

Dropped a clanger - can refer to either obnoxious gas passing or a big obvious mistake.

Sometimes it is called cupcaking, too, and can also refer to a bra that does not fit properly and this results in cup spillage.

There are also many sayings mea ing "I'm onto the issue." "Like white on rice" is the first that comes to mind, and "Like flies on dung."

I've heard muffin top, but not cupcaking.  And the bra thing I've more commonly heard as "quadraboob" (when the cup cuts each side in half . . . yeah, y'all know what I mean!)

I've definitely heard quadraboob, too...that's the same thing as cupcaking as I described, though I've heard the bottom half (tight pants) called cupcaking and the top half (quadraboob) called muffintopping...I guess it really just depends who you talk to, but we all get the same general idea from it.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

CakeEater

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #218 on: September 16, 2012, 06:32:21 AM »
*One thing I've noticed as a difference when speaking to friends from the UK is how they manage their contractions. For example, where I would say "I haven't walked the dog yet" they'd say "I've not walked the dog yet". Basically if there are two available contractions we will consistently choose differently.

*I am familiar with using the word "dear" to mean expensive, but mostly from my mother so perhaps it is a little old fashioned.

*Hobish - you make a good point. I will leave it at that though in order to keep the thread recognisable :)

I love the British version of this, and decided I'd use it when I could. But you're right, I would  never have chosen those before my visit there.

katycoo

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #219 on: September 16, 2012, 07:41:38 AM »
I'm not sure if this is regional or universal. But do you use the word 'dear' to mean expensive? I was talking with someone today and she used the word to mean that an item cost a lot. It's a bit old fashioned I guess.

Yes, in Australia.  Its not common with the young-folk though.

MummySweet

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #220 on: September 16, 2012, 10:46:45 AM »
I've heard muffin top, but not cupcaking.  And the bra thing I've more commonly heard as "quadraboob" (when the cup cuts each side in half . . . yeah, y'all know what I mean!)
[/quote]

I've definitely heard quadraboob, too...that's the same thing as cupcaking as I described, though I've heard the bottom half (tight pants) called cupcaking and the top half (quadraboob) called muffintopping...I guess it really just depends who you talk to, but we all get the same general idea from it.
[/quote]

I always thought the top bit was called "Rushmoring."   I wonder if that's more of an Upper Midwest of the US thing?   
   

** Sorry I messed up the quote tree!

Hmmmmm

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #221 on: September 16, 2012, 11:00:38 AM »
I got curious and googled it and it appears to have been used at least since the 70s but it was maybe restricted more to people involved with sports, especially basketball.

This is how I remember it starting.  Basketball players admitting to personal fouls.  I absolutely detest the term used to acknoweledge a mistake.  It sounds so ignorant to me.  What is so hard about saying "my fault" or "my mistake" or just sorry.

What is so hard about it? Using alternate phrases adds flavor and nuance to our language. It is limiting language that is "ignorant" not expanding it.

I'm fine with a flavorful language.  However, this phrase is too close to"almost" correct use.  To me it's like hearing someone use good when well is correct.  Or someone saying me and Joe instead of Joe and I. 

hobish

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #222 on: September 18, 2012, 06:46:34 PM »
I got curious and googled it and it appears to have been used at least since the 70s but it was maybe restricted more to people involved with sports, especially basketball.

This is how I remember it starting.  Basketball players admitting to personal fouls.  I absolutely detest the term used to acknoweledge a mistake.  It sounds so ignorant to me.  What is so hard about saying "my fault" or "my mistake" or just sorry.

What is so hard about it? Using alternate phrases adds flavor and nuance to our language. It is limiting language that is "ignorant" not expanding it.

I'm fine with a flavorful language.  However, this phrase is too close to"almost" correct use.  To me it's like hearing someone use good when well is correct.  Or someone saying me and Joe instead of Joe and I.

That makes sense - and it is your opinion and you are entitled to it, in any case.  :)

MummySweet, "Rushmoring" is a completely new one to me. I think i love it.

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Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #223 on: September 19, 2012, 06:02:03 AM »
Haven't heard it for a while, but somebody who went for style over substance used to be referred to in the UK as 'fur coat and no knickers'.

Thipu1

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #224 on: September 19, 2012, 09:31:31 AM »
Haven't heard it for a while, but somebody who went for style over substance used to be referred to in the UK as 'fur coat and no knickers'.

Here I've heard

All hat and no saddle

All talk and no walk