Author Topic: Regional sayings  (Read 47190 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

lowspark

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3694
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #225 on: September 19, 2012, 10:20:36 AM »
What we called the "feeder" in Houston is called an "access road" or "frontage road" elsewhere -- the road that goes along the side of a highway for on-and-off access.

That is so confusing. We were in Houston for a wedding and the driving instructions to get to the rehearsal dinner said "Take Feeder Road." DH and I keep looking for a road named "Feeder." We flipped a witch about four times before I said "Maybe 'Feeder' means 'frontage.'"

I'm just now making my way through this thread but I had to comment on this. I had a similar experience in New York (state). We were given directions which said to turn at "Jug Handle". We kept looking for a street called Jug Handle. There wasn't one. It took us a while to realize what a jug handle was.

The funny thing is, I'm from Houston and yes, we say feeder when others say access or frontage. And a recently redesigned section of freeway way south of where I live now has a jug handle! Although I'm not sure anyone around here calls it that. It's the first jug handle I'd ever seen here in Houston, now that I know what they are!

lowspark

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3694
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #226 on: September 19, 2012, 10:23:06 AM »
Dark Boyfriend loves to make possessive y'all. I'm slowly getting used to it but it always sounded so weird at first.

I both "turn" and "hang a" left.

A pididdle (sp?) is a car with one headlight out. Learned that in PA; nobody I met had heard it called that in CO.

My Hawaiin "family" calls flip flops (also known as thongs ;) "slippers".

When I was a teenager, we called a car with one headlight "spidoodle" which is pretty cloe to pididdle.

Cat-Fu

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 523
  • My cat is a ninja
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #227 on: September 19, 2012, 11:23:26 AM »
Padiddle! I used to play by the hardcore rules where the last person to hit the ceiling for a padiddle takes off a piece of clothing.  >:D
“Poetry is a sword of lightning, ever unsheathed, which consumes the scabbard that would contain it.” PBS

lowspark

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3694
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #228 on: September 19, 2012, 11:25:33 AM »
Catching up...

This is what I call the things discussed above:
Purse (not bag or handbag or pocket book)
Bag = noun
Sack = verb
... as in, Would you please sack my groceries in a paper bag?
Cart (although I have heard basket). I've heard of buggy but never actually knew someone who used that term.
out of pocket - I've heard it used both ways. The money reference, especially in reference to insurance. "Maximum out of pocket with this plan is $2500". It's not all that common to say "I'll be out of pocket for the rest of the day" meaning incommunicado, but I've definitely heard it used.
in your pocket = definitely means you're bribing someone. "The mobster has the mayor in his pocket."

Regarding GeauxTigers' mention of police jury, it kind of reminds me of County Judge which is a political office in Texas (don't know if it's used elsewhere as well). The county judge isn't a judge at all, but more of something like a mayor for the county.

"My bad" is pretty commonly used here, it's one of those sayings that became so over used it's trite. Like "having said that" or "I know, right?"

Coke. Coke = soda = pop = genereic name for a carbonated beverage.
Example conversation:
-- You want a coke?
-- Sure, what kind do you have?
-- Dr. Pepper and Sprite.
-- OK, I'll take a Sprite.

"None of your beeswax" was what we said as kids. I have always thought of it as a child's expression, not something adults would say.  :)

Dear as expensive is not something that I've heard commonly used. However, my mother, whose first language was French, used "cher" (which means dear) to mean expensive. I associate the word dear meaning expensive with the Beatles song, When I'm Sixty-four.
Every summer we can rent a cottage
In the Isle of Wight, if it's not too dear

jmarvellous

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3373
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #229 on: September 19, 2012, 11:32:36 AM »
What are "nachos" to you?

To me, they're a baked dish with melted cheese and possibly lots of other stuff (veggies, beans, meats) on tortilla chips. Or maybe tortilla chips with a side of that weird melted cheese stuff -- from a can or a dispenser if you're at a ballpark or something.

To BF, they're that ... or just the chips. I've never known anyone else to call tortilla chips "nachos," and since he's vegan, it's even weirder for him to suggest nachos, in the traditional sense, as a snack. FWIW, he's from Pennsylvania. Is this common there or elsewhere?

Another one that I'm pretty sure isn't regional but still confuses me: "Heavens to Betsy!"

lowspark

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3694
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #230 on: September 19, 2012, 11:40:05 AM »
Nachos are tortilla chips with cheese melted onto them. Additional toppings such as jalepenos, beans, meat, onions, tomatoes, etc., are optional.

The only way I've ever heard the word nachos in reference to chips themselves is as a flavor of Doritos. Nacho cheese flavored Doritos are not my favorite but they're not bad either!

PastryGoddess

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4526
    • My Image Portfolio and Store
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #231 on: September 19, 2012, 12:32:29 PM »
Got a few new ones courtesy of my family. 

Burn meaning someone who can cook really well.
"Girl, you sure know how to burn in the kitchen"

Stick/Stuck/Put your foot in it meaning really flavorful food
After cooking all day and night the chef carefully takes her foot out of the food and the ravenous hordes descend

Cat-Fu

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 523
  • My cat is a ninja
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #232 on: September 19, 2012, 12:42:49 PM »
I use nachos and tortilla chips interchangably, and when they have cheese and beans and such melted on them, they're loaded nachos. Just the cheese and tortilla chips is nachos and cheese. And now I really want some!
“Poetry is a sword of lightning, ever unsheathed, which consumes the scabbard that would contain it.” PBS

Mental Magpie

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5027
  • ...for the dark side looks back.
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #233 on: September 19, 2012, 01:12:12 PM »
Another one from Pennsylvania that calls just the chips "nachos".  If they have cheese, they're nachos and cheese (or cheese and nachos).  Anything else on them becomes nachos and whatever else is on them.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

jmarvellous

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3373
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #234 on: September 19, 2012, 01:23:49 PM »
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

Danika

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1917
  • I'm not speeding. I'm qualifying.
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #235 on: September 19, 2012, 02:15:57 PM »
Haven't heard it for a while, but somebody who went for style over substance used to be referred to in the UK as 'fur coat and no knickers'.

Here I've heard

All hat and no saddle

All talk and no walk

Here, there's a saying to describe someone who's all talk or all show and no substance to back it up. It goes something like "he has the [cowboy] hat and the buckle, but no horse."

Mental Magpie

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5027
  • ...for the dark side looks back.
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #236 on: September 19, 2012, 02:37:59 PM »
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

He can be reformed!  Haha, Mental Boyfriend is Texan...I now say oil like y'all (and say y'all for that matter), and I know he doesn't necessarily want Coke when he says he wants a coke.  He also knows what I mean when I say sweep and don't mean with a broom (I mean with a vacuum).  Thus I have started to ask him if he wants a coke to see what he wants to drink, though I still ask for a pop for myself, and he says he'll sweep the floor and get the vacuum out.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

Thipu1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6617
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #237 on: September 19, 2012, 03:10:19 PM »
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

Dear Jmarvellous.  We hope you'd have little problem in Park Slope

Here, nachos aren't just sad, little naked tortilla chips. A decent dish of nachos will include chips and salsa.  Perhaps refritos will be included.  A good dish of nachos will include some jalapeños.  A generous amount of good, grated cheese will be added and the whole thing dipped under the broiler for a minute or two.

This sort of misunderstanding isn't limited to nachos. A local restaurant named 'Mr.  Falafel' claims to have had a hard time at the beginning because locals didn't know what falafel was.  Local people thought that 'falafel' and 'pita' were the same thing.

violinp

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3522
  • cabbagegirl28's my sister :)
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #238 on: September 19, 2012, 04:19:14 PM »
Well, I'm glad he's not a lone oddball in his nacho=tortilla chip thing.

But it does make my little mostly Texan heart sad. I'm going to have a hard time if I ever move north!

Dear Jmarvellous.  We hope you'd have little problem in Park Slope

Here, nachos aren't just sad, little naked tortilla chips. A decent dish of nachos will include chips and salsa.  Perhaps refritos will be included.  A good dish of nachos will include some jalapeños.  A generous amount of good, grated cheese will be added and the whole thing dipped under the broiler for a minute or two.

This sort of misunderstanding isn't limited to nachos. A local restaurant named 'Mr.  Falafel' claims to have had a hard time at the beginning because locals didn't know what falafel was. Local people thought that 'falafel' and 'pita' were the same thing.

*blinkblink* What. I mean, they're both amazingly good, but they're not even remotely in the same culture. Ow.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


katycoo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3732
Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #239 on: September 19, 2012, 04:43:01 PM »
Local people thought that 'falafel' and 'pita' were the same thing.

But, pita is a flat bread and a felafel is a chickpea patty.  They're 2 ingredients in a felafel kebab...