Author Topic: Regional sayings  (Read 54471 times)

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Mental Magpie

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #360 on: May 29, 2014, 10:43:22 AM »
Those outside Australia can try their hand at this one - I'm interested to see if other countries use it at all.

"Bangin' like a dunny door."

I'm going to guess it is much like what we call a screen door, the second door that allows wind through if you leave the first door open. They are notorious racket makers when not secured during a storm.
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Ms_Cellany

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #361 on: May 29, 2014, 10:56:50 AM »
Those outside Australia can try their hand at this one - I'm interested to see if other countries use it at all.

"Bangin' like a dunny door."

I'm going to guess it is much like what we call a screen door, the second door that allows wind through if you leave the first door open. They are notorious racket makers when not secured during a storm.

I'm guessing "dunny" is what USAians call an outhouse. Doors unsecured when empty.
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Elfmama

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #362 on: May 29, 2014, 01:10:23 PM »
Those outside Australia can try their hand at this one - I'm interested to see if other countries use it at all.

"Bangin' like a dunny door."

I'm going to guess it is much like what we call a screen door, the second door that allows wind through if you leave the first door open. They are notorious racket makers when not secured during a storm.

I'm guessing "dunny" is what USAians call an outhouse. Doors unsecured when empty.
I think you're right on 'dunny' but I didn't think that it meant banging in the wind, but banging because of heavy use, one person goes out and the next person in line goes in.  (Either it's a family reunion, or a family that's passing a severe digestive virus back and forth.) 
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ClaireC79

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #363 on: May 29, 2014, 01:22:09 PM »
Grockles are tourists in Cornwall I think

jaxsue

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #364 on: May 30, 2014, 11:53:20 AM »
Grockles are tourists in Cornwall I think

Interesting what tourists are called around the world.

Here in NJ, at the shore, they're called "bennies." (in some towns, anyway)
When I was in VT to see the fall foliage we were called "leaf peepers."
Where I grew up, in N. MI (a town that was mainly tourism) they were "fudgies."

AfleetAlex

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #365 on: May 30, 2014, 02:02:52 PM »
Can't turn down that Mackinac Island fudge! :-)  I think that's where the name came from, anyway.

Of note: If you get the chance in Michigan to buy fudge, I encourage it.
I have a chronic case of foot-in-mouth disease.

Mental Magpie

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #366 on: May 30, 2014, 02:55:47 PM »
Grockles are tourists in Cornwall I think

Interesting what tourists are called around the world.

Here in NJ, at the shore, they're called "bennies." (in some towns, anyway)
When I was in VT to see the fall foliage we were called "leaf peepers."
Where I grew up, in N. MI (a town that was mainly tourism) they were "fudgies."

NW Pennsylvania here...lots of Pittsburghers came to my small every year, every weekend. We called them "mup-eres", as in a crammed together shortening of "I'm up here for the weekend."
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

jilly

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #367 on: May 30, 2014, 03:37:35 PM »
That's a lot of different words for tourist.

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Fi

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #368 on: May 31, 2014, 07:39:13 AM »
Grockles are tourists in Cornwall I think

Grockles are Somerset and Devon for tourist; Cornwall calls them Emmetts.

Here's one for you: "Now you're sucking diesel."
« Last Edit: May 31, 2014, 07:56:16 AM by Fi »

Snooks

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #369 on: May 31, 2014, 08:30:21 AM »
Grockles are tourists in Cornwall I think

Interesting what tourists are called around the world.

Here in NJ, at the shore, they're called "bennies." (in some Townsville, anyway)
When I was in VT to see the fall foliage we were called "leaf peepers."
Where I grew up, in N. MI (a town that was mainly tourism) they were "fudgies."

Living in a very touristy city I wish we had a good name for them but generally they're just "bloody tourists"!

Redsoil

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #370 on: May 31, 2014, 08:33:12 AM »
Those outside Australia can try their hand at this one - I'm interested to see if other countries use it at all.

"Bangin' like a dunny door."

I'm going to guess it is much like what we call a screen door, the second door that allows wind through if you leave the first door open. They are notorious racket makers when not secured during a storm.

I'm guessing "dunny" is what USAians call an outhouse. Doors unsecured when empty.
I think you're right on 'dunny' but I didn't think that it meant banging in the wind, but banging because of heavy use, one person goes out and the next person in line goes in.  (Either it's a family reunion, or a family that's passing a severe digestive virus back and forth.) 

Interesting to see the interpretations!

Correct in the assumption that a "dunny" is indeed an "outhouse".  (The phrase is at times used to indicate vigorous scrabble activity.)
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Peppergirl

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #371 on: May 31, 2014, 09:02:32 AM »
I haven't gotten through the entire thread yet, but since this is *extremely* regional, I think I'm safe to say it's not been mentioned:

Where I'm from (at least back-in-the-day), one would use the word 'Please?' instead of 'Pardon?'.

Example -

Person #1  "Do you have the time?"
Person #2  (if they didn't hear them) "Please?"


When growing up, we knew never to utter it on vacation or we'd get odd stares and quizzical looks.   :D

oz diva

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #372 on: May 31, 2014, 09:39:05 AM »

Here's one for you: "Now you're sucking diesel."
I'd imagine it was now you're doing it right. I say 'now you're cooking with gas.'

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Fi

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #373 on: May 31, 2014, 09:44:56 AM »

Here's one for you: "Now you're sucking diesel."
I'd imagine it was now you're doing it right. I say 'now you're cooking with gas.'

Exactly! Irish country phrase.

menley

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #374 on: May 31, 2014, 10:10:17 AM »
I haven't gotten through the entire thread yet, but since this is *extremely* regional, I think I'm safe to say it's not been mentioned:

Where I'm from (at least back-in-the-day), one would use the word 'Please?' instead of 'Pardon?'.

Example -

Person #1  "Do you have the time?"
Person #2  (if they didn't hear them) "Please?"


When growing up, we knew never to utter it on vacation or we'd get odd stares and quizzical looks.   :D

Hah! In Hungary, the word that you'd say is "Tessék" - which translates to "here you go", "go ahead", or strangely, "action!" (like what you say before starting filming). So if someone says something you don't understand, the response is essentially "Go ahead?" which made zero sense to me for months.