Author Topic: Regional sayings  (Read 50623 times)

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cabbageweevil

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #375 on: June 02, 2014, 07:50:04 AM »
Grockles are Somerset and Devon for tourist; Cornwall calls them Emmetts.

"Emmett" in this context comes, I'm given to understand, from the word for "ant" in the Cornish language !

Thipu1

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #376 on: June 02, 2014, 11:19:06 AM »
'Emmett' for 'ant' is a staple in American crosswords although I've never heard it in conversation. 

baglady

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #377 on: June 03, 2014, 06:35:23 PM »
I went to a college in northern New Hampshire, and "emmett" was the local slang (among students and townies) for people from New Hampshire. Vermonters were called "newts."

I currently live near Lake George, N.Y., where the locals refer to the tourists as "tourons" -- a portmanteau of "tourist" and "moron." Not all tourists are tourons, though -- just the boorish ones.
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jaxsue

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #378 on: June 03, 2014, 09:47:07 PM »
'Emmett' for 'ant' is a staple in American crosswords although I've never heard it in conversation.

ITA

jaxsue

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #379 on: June 03, 2014, 09:48:38 PM »
Can't turn down that Mackinac Island fudge! :-)  I think that's where the name came from, anyway.

Of note: If you get the chance in Michigan to buy fudge, I encourage it.

And don't forget the pasties! :-)

scotcat60

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #380 on: June 04, 2014, 10:20:19 AM »
I'm guessing "dunny" is what USAians call an outhouse. Doors unsecured when empty.
I think you're right on 'dunny' but I didn't think that it meant banging in the wind, but banging because of heavy use, one person goes out and the next person in line goes in.  (Either it's a family reunion, or a family that's passing a severe digestive virus back and forth.) 

In short, because someone has a severe case of the back-door trots, as we'd say in the UK.

Danika

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #381 on: June 04, 2014, 08:23:25 PM »
I'm guessing "dunny" is what USAians call an outhouse. Doors unsecured when empty.
I think you're right on 'dunny' but I didn't think that it meant banging in the wind, but banging because of heavy use, one person goes out and the next person in line goes in.  (Either it's a family reunion, or a family that's passing a severe digestive virus back and forth.) 

In short, because someone has a severe case of the back-door trots, as we'd say in the UK.

To my knowledge, in the U.S., "dunny" isn't even a word. I'd never heard it before this thread (born and raised in the U.S.). I believe it's an Australian term.

Psychopoesie

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #382 on: June 04, 2014, 08:33:37 PM »
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

Danika

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #383 on: June 04, 2014, 08:49:49 PM »
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

Psychopoesie

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #384 on: June 04, 2014, 09:01:21 PM »
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

Had heard of that one as a naval expression more generally. Think it turned up in something I was reading. I haven't heard anyone actually say it.

Danika

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #385 on: June 04, 2014, 09:52:22 PM »
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

Had heard of that one as a naval expression more generally. Think it turned up in something I was reading. I haven't heard anyone actually say it.

I'll hear it one in a while. Here in the western U.S. you'll also sometimes (rarely) hear "I've got to see a man about a horse" meaning the same thing. Or when you're boating on a lake with friends, you excuse yourself and say "I have to check the propeller."

Psychopoesie

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #386 on: June 04, 2014, 09:55:30 PM »
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

Had heard of that one as a naval expression more generally. Think it turned up in something I was reading. I haven't heard anyone actually say it.

I'll hear it one in a while. Here in the western U.S. you'll also sometimes (rarely) hear "I've got to see a man about a horse" meaning the same thing. Or when you're boating on a lake with friends, you excuse yourself and say "I have to check the propeller."

Same sort of thing here, although i tend to hear it as "have to see a man about a dog."

Slartibartfast

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #387 on: June 05, 2014, 12:42:41 AM »
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

"Head" can be a tricky one, though, since it's WAY too easy to say something that can be misconstrued as a double entendre for fellatio ::)

Mental Magpie

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #388 on: June 05, 2014, 02:08:20 PM »
In my experience, "head" meaning toilet is now a common military expression and has worked its way into para-military institutions, such as police departments and corrections related areas.  I hear it used on a weekly basis.
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Margo

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Re: Regional sayings
« Reply #389 on: June 06, 2014, 07:12:22 AM »
Yes, dunny is Australian for an outhouse although, with outhouses becoming less common, it also seems to be used by some folks to refer to toilets more generally (sometimes in a jokey way).

I heard that biffy is a similar term used in parts of Canada and US. Is that right?

I've never heard of biffy either (I've lived all over the U.S.) but one I hear once in a while is "head" because, for some reason, that's the term for lavatory on a ship. I'm told that in the U.S. Navy, they refer to it as "the head" and so now most Americans will know what you mean if you say "I need to 'hit the head'." It means "I need to use the bathroom/lavatory/toilet."

the reason is that back in the days of wooden ships, you relieved yourself over the side of the ship, and the designated place was right at the front of the ship, next to the figurehead, so it was purely descriptive, and the name stuck even after the location changed.

Dunny I think is originally an English term but as it tended to mean a bucket toilet or earth closet it is obsolete.  (there used to be 'dunnycarts' which came round to collect the contents of the buckets, in towns) I would guess that perhaps the term survived in Australia partly as it may have continued to be more common *not* to have mains drainage for longer, particualrly in rural areas, although I may be wrong.