A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. > Trans-Atlantic Knowledge Exchange

What kind of radio does your country have?

(1/3) > >>

paintpots:
I've just bought a house and am currently spending my days scrubbing walls while listening to BBC Radio 4, and I'm interested to know what kind of radio stations other countries have.

I'm in the UK where we have the BBC Radio stations:

Radio 1 - current pop music, mostly aimed at the 16-24 market, with certain DJs having a particular music genre (e.g. dance music, hip hop)
Radio 2 - pop music and chat, 24+ (I'm guessing these age ranges by the way) - everything from 50s music onwards
Radio 3 - classical (considered to be quite highbrow)
Radio 4 - speech - news, news analysis, radio plays, documentaries, arts & culture etc.. my favourite station - this weekend I listened to a programme on Vanilla, a radio play about Thomas Payne, poetry in prisons, and all sorts of other interesting things. Also has the 'Today' programme, always satisfying to hear politicians squirm under interrogation :)
Radio 5 - talk and sport
Then there are the digital radio stations, which are a bit more niche in content - I haven't really explored them though.

Each county/city also has it's own local BBC station, and then there are commercial (i.e. with adverts) radio stations which play pop music (can be local or national), and Classic FM, which is classical music, but a bit more 'popular classic' if that makes sense.

We don't have any political radio stations (or at least I've not come across any) - the BBC have to give airspace to all parties so are supposedly balanced, whereas our print media has more political bias.

What does everyone else have?

WillyNilly:
Thats a difficult question to answer and we have hundreds of thousands of radio stations in the states!  Public radio, talk radio, religious radio, pop music, country music, rap music, hip-hop music, rock music, "oldies" music, religious music, various cultural stations in various languages, children's radio, news radio, you name it, its there.

magicdomino:
First, the U.S. has two kinds of radio transmission (I'm lumping AM and FM together):  satelite and broadcast. 

Satelite radio works like satelite TV.  You buy a receiver (usually installed in cars, although there are home versions), and pay a monthly subscription.  The satelite receiver can pick up multiple channels all over the country, so it is great for people who drive long distances a lot.

Broadcast radio is more chaotic.  Individual stations have their own programming.  Well, more or less their own; many stations, especially talk radio, buy syndicated shows, and a growing trend is one company owning stations all over the country and using the same programming for all.  The vast majority of radio stations are like jammytoast's commercial stations, with commercials. 

Most major cities also have National Public Radio (NPR), which is the radio equivilent of public TV.  Instead of commercials, they have incredibly annoying pledge drives every few months.

CLE_Girl:

--- Quote from: magicdomino on August 28, 2012, 11:28:38 AM ---First, the U.S. has two kinds of radio transmission (I'm lumping AM and FM together):  satelite and broadcast. 

Satelite radio works like satelite TV.  You buy a receiver (usually installed in cars, although there are home versions), and pay a monthly subscription.  The satelite receiver can pick up multiple channels all over the country, so it is great for people who drive long distances a lot.

Broadcast radio is more chaotic.  Individual stations have their own programming.  Well, more or less their own; many stations, especially talk radio, buy syndicated shows, and a growing trend is one company owning stations all over the country and using the same programming for all.  The vast majority of radio stations are like jammytoast's commercial stations, with commercials. 

Most major cities also have National Public Radio (NPR), which is the radio equivalent of public TV.  Instead of commercials, they have incredibly annoying pledge drives every few months.

--- End quote ---

I'll add two other options:

HD radio, which is hybrid of satelite and broadcast.  The channels are run by broadcast station but you have to buy a special receiver to get the stations.  A lot of times the main FM station will have 1-2 HD stations that are more specialized versions of the FM station (for example in Cleveland the alternative/hard rock station 100.7 has two HD stations one for Heavy metal and one for what they call Adult contemporary alternative (I call it "hipster" music). 

College Radio, broadcast FM stations run by universities.  Since these stations are "indepentant" (not owned by one of the 2-3 major communication companies) they can play a wider variaty of music and the DJ's are students either doing it to become a professional or just for fun.   

Venus193:
To  complicate matters further, commercial radio in the US varies by metropolitan area, so if you're into country music and don't have satellite radio, you're out of luck in New York City.

Music formats have sub-genres like crazy, so except for classical (which isn't everywhere) there are numerous forms of:

Rock
Latin
Jazz
Rap
Oldies

Commercial radio stations also do promotions with people calling in trivia answers or going to specific locations when the station's van is scheduled to be there to collect free things like T-shirts and things provided by advertisers.  Vans typically look like this:



Do British stations do things like this?

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version