Author Topic: Facebook and professionalism  (Read 7080 times)

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QueenofAllThings

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2012, 06:40:01 PM »
I stick to the personal on Facebook. Frankly, I'm annoyed when a friend 'friends' me, only to find that all their posts exist to push their business. I feel a little used.

Twik

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2012, 10:52:14 AM »
Really? She thinks that you should be "more professional" by publicly proclaiming your political leanings to potential clients and employers?

Seriously, this sounds like a great way to reduce your hireability, unless you wish to only work for people who share a specific position (like repeatedly posting pro-green messages if you really have your heart set on working for  an ecology-based non-profit group). Otherwise, a "Politician X is totally clueless!" rant may cost you that dream job when the recruiter is a lifelong supporter of Politician X's party.
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Venus193

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2012, 11:41:52 AM »
I personally see that as a tactic in Professional Darwinism.

JeanFromBNA

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #18 on: September 09, 2012, 07:13:13 PM »
Anything on social media is discoverable, which is why you want to be careful with it.  There is no such thing as a private and public FB account in that case.  For example, a friend's FB has numerous pictures of her with a drink in her hand/at a party.  This could be a problem for her if she is ever trying to defend herself against a serious charge in which alcohol is involved.  This could also be a problem if she was representing the state in a drunk driving case as a lawyer (she's not a lawyer, this is just an example). 

Don't get what the problem is with fuzzy kitten pictures, though, and I'd go easy on the politics, unless that is your intended profession. 

MERUNCC13

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #19 on: September 09, 2012, 09:15:52 PM »
Anything on social media is discoverable, which is why you want to be careful with it.  There is no such thing as a private and public FB account in that case.  For example, a friend's FB has numerous pictures of her with a drink in her hand/at a party.  This could be a problem for her if she is ever trying to defend herself against a serious charge in which alcohol is involved.  This could also be a problem if she was representing the state in a drunk driving case as a lawyer (she's not a lawyer, this is just an example). 

Don't get what the problem is with fuzzy kitten pictures, though, and I'd go easy on the politics, unless that is your intended profession. 

I agree - when I was job hunting I kept my Fb account rather bland, as I knew that potential employers might check out my page and really kept my LinkedIn account in a professional tone for my professional contacts and networking.  Now that I have a job I still have to keep it rather low-key, as I work in the local school system and don't want anything out there that I couldn't tell my husband about (or my parents for that matter!)

While I do express some of my personal views (lifelong member of the donkey party) I try to keep it as low-key and uncontroversial as possible and yes, I do post fuzzy kitten pictures once in a while!. 
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katycoo

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #20 on: September 09, 2012, 09:23:46 PM »
Speaking as a lawyer:

My LinkedIn is my professional profile.

I barely use Twitter, its not under my real name, and it they found it, they would be bored.

My Facebook is locked down completely.  I think its searchable but its under my married name (I work under my maiden) and if they find it, they can't see it.  And despite the fact that I post nothing I would be concerned about, I've no intention to show it to employers.

Mopsy428

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #21 on: September 09, 2012, 09:43:16 PM »
I'm a lawyer. You don't need LinkedIn or Twitter, and if you want to keep Facebook personal, go ahead, although, like others have said, don't put anything that could get you in trouble on it.

mrs_deb

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #22 on: September 09, 2012, 09:48:45 PM »
eriously, this sounds like a great way to reduce your hireability, unless you wish to only work for people who share a specific position (like repeatedly posting pro-green messages if you really have your heart set on working for  an ecology-based non-profit group). Otherwise, a "Politician X is totally clueless!" rant may cost you that dream job when the recruiter is a lifelong supporter of Politician X's party.

I totally agree with Twik.  I don't know about other countries, but I'd think the US is pretty evenly divided between right and left.  One ill-considered political rant and you've probably offended 50% of your friends and family.
 
I also really can't understand main-street type business that come out strongly against one party or the other.  Yes, of course you have the right to free speech.  However, I also have the right to refuse to patronize your business if you have a huge sign in your window proclaiming that "Politician X And His Followers Are Morons".  And I'm going to remember that, also, well after the elections are over.

Venus193

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #23 on: September 10, 2012, 06:33:44 AM »
Quote
I also really can't understand main-street type business that come out strongly against one party or the other.  Yes, of course you have the right to free speech.  However, I also have the right to refuse to patronize your business if you have a huge sign in your window proclaiming that "Politician X And His Followers Are Morons".  And I'm going to remember that, also, well after the elections are over.

True.  There was a business like that in my area which is now closed.

Right or wrong, you are also judged by the company you keep.  One friend's newsfeed is loaded with political stuff.  My FB is very tightly controlled and I have only 28 friends.  She has 376 and I wonder whether she could be found through any of them when she starts looking for work.

Madam Pansy

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #24 on: September 10, 2012, 09:45:29 AM »
My Facebook is locked up tight due to Recruitment requirements. All that comes up is my name and profile pic. My old supervisor at work said that she was pleasantly surprised when she looked me up before calling me in for an interview.

I don't post anything I wouldn't want my parents to see, mainly because they are friends and my dad "likes" everything I post. Also, the IT Director for my sorority looks over everyone's profile to make sure we are promoting a positive image.

blarg314

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #25 on: September 11, 2012, 07:40:06 PM »

I agree with others that it's weird advice.

I do think that you should be careful about your Facebook privacy settings - make sure that what shows up to a non-friend search is enough to identify you, but no more (name, home-town, schools, profile pic).  I also think it's wise if you are in a career where public image matters, to keep an eye on what and how you post. If you're in a career like this, you should probably be keeping an eye on what you *do* as well, as other people can post stuff about you without your permission (like pictures of strip poker games  ::) ) And personal and professional networking should probably be kept separate.

But I do think that Facebook is more intended as a family/friends network, not a social networking site. You have LinkedIn for that. Personally, I would tell the instructor that you use Facebook only for personal contacts and do not connect it to your business life at all, and ask whether she recommends having a second Facebook site for professional purposes, in addition to its normal use.

And I must say, I'm not sure what I would think about a lawyer having a professional twitter feed - celebrities/public figures sure, but your lawyer?


nrb80

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #26 on: September 13, 2012, 08:36:09 AM »

I agree with others that it's weird advice.

I do think that you should be careful about your Facebook privacy settings - make sure that what shows up to a non-friend search is enough to identify you, but no more (name, home-town, schools, profile pic).  I also think it's wise if you are in a career where public image matters, to keep an eye on what and how you post. If you're in a career like this, you should probably be keeping an eye on what you *do* as well, as other people can post stuff about you without your permission (like pictures of strip poker games  ::) ) And personal and professional networking should probably be kept separate.

But I do think that Facebook is more intended as a family/friends network, not a social networking site. You have LinkedIn for that. Personally, I would tell the instructor that you use Facebook only for personal contacts and do not connect it to your business life at all, and ask whether she recommends having a second Facebook site for professional purposes, in addition to its normal use.

And I must say, I'm not sure what I would think about a lawyer having a professional twitter feed - celebrities/public figures sure, but your lawyer?

Arguably America's greatest living lawyer in practice, John Quinn, and a celebrity in his own right.

That said, I've seen a lot of interesting tweets from lawyers that are professionally focused - the boring ones are marketing, the interesting ones are legal news.

Mopsy428

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #27 on: September 16, 2012, 12:17:02 AM »

I agree with others that it's weird advice.

I do think that you should be careful about your Facebook privacy settings - make sure that what shows up to a non-friend search is enough to identify you, but no more (name, home-town, schools, profile pic).  I also think it's wise if you are in a career where public image matters, to keep an eye on what and how you post. If you're in a career like this, you should probably be keeping an eye on what you *do* as well, as other people can post stuff about you without your permission (like pictures of strip poker games  ::) ) And personal and professional networking should probably be kept separate.

But I do think that Facebook is more intended as a family/friends network, not a social networking site. You have LinkedIn for that. Personally, I would tell the instructor that you use Facebook only for personal contacts and do not connect it to your business life at all, and ask whether she recommends having a second Facebook site for professional purposes, in addition to its normal use.

And I must say, I'm not sure what I would think about a lawyer having a professional twitter feed - celebrities/public figures sure, but your lawyer?

Arguably America's greatest living lawyer in practice, John Quinn, and a celebrity in his own right.

That said, I've seen a lot of interesting tweets from lawyers that are professionally focused - the boring ones are marketing, the interesting ones are legal news.
Yep. Back when  I practiced IP law, I had a twitter feed where I tweeted news trademark news articles. Lots of lawyers I know do the same thing. It's more interesting than "I just ate a turkey sandwich" or "Little Johnny just cut his first tooth!"

JoW

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Re: Facebook and professionalism
« Reply #28 on: September 16, 2012, 08:12:40 PM »
Be very very careful with what you put out for everyone to see on your Facebook page.  I know the owner of a small engineering consulting firm.  She routinely looks up all potential employees on Facebook.  She does this after receiving the resume, before calling them.  She has rejected at least 2 applicants based on what she saw on Facebook.  No questions.  No chance to explain.  She just pitched the resumes and sent the applicants the standard rejection letter.