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Canadian Thanksgiving.

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sparksals:
Canadian Thanksgiving in more modern times is to celebrate the end of Harvest.  Since the growing season in Canada is shorter than that of the US, ours is earlier, which ties in with the Harvest Festival.  We had no Pilgrims and don't have the same historical foundation of Thanksgiving that Americans do.  Our histories are very different.

I made my stuffing and cranberry sauce earlier in the week and they are in the freezer.  Made Mashed potatoes, turnips/brown sugar/apples and broccoli/cauliflower au gratin today.   In our circle, turnips/rutabagas are a staple at Thanksgiving and Xmas dinners. 

Korea has their own Thanksgiving called Chu Seok.  They take the weekend to visit their deceased relatives graves in their hometowns.  They also have traditional meals they eat... if they can make it through the traffic.




Outdoor Girl:
The last few years, Thanksgiving dinner has been a true harvest festival for my family, as most of the vegetables came from family gardens.  This year, the carrots came from my brother's garden, some of the beets and rutabagas came from mine, as well as the Brussel sprouts.  The rest of the beets came from my CSA farm.  Usually I'd have a rutabaga from them, too, but didn't get one this week.  Other years, the potatoes have been from my brother's garden but we had to buy them this year.  The pumpkins used for the pumpkin pie came from the CSA farm, too.

(We had our dinner last night so my Dad and I wouldn't have to drive in Monday's traffic.)

Rohanna:
We just had ours yesterday with 18  :o  people (family work schedules)- we had:

Turkey (used Alton Brown's brine)
Ham- I made a pineapple-spice glaze that was a HUGE hit
Peas and corn (with as a PP said, just salt and butter)
Mashed potatoes, wild rice, and roast root veggies
cornbread stuffing
tomato and cucumber salad
Pumpkin and blueberry pies, and berry jello trifle

99 percent of the time we have perogies and bacon too (super common here for holidays), but I didn't have the energy to do another main dish this year, so my sis made mashed potatoes instead.

sparksals:

--- Quote from: Outdoor Girl on October 07, 2012, 05:16:33 PM ---The last few years, Thanksgiving dinner has been a true harvest festival for my family, as most of the vegetables came from family gardens.  This year, the carrots came from my brother's garden, some of the beets and rutabagas came from mine, as well as the Brussel sprouts.  The rest of the beets came from my CSA farm.  Usually I'd have a rutabaga from them, too, but didn't get one this week.  Other years, the potatoes have been from my brother's garden but we had to buy them this year.  The pumpkins used for the pumpkin pie came from the CSA farm, too.

(We had our dinner last night so my Dad and I wouldn't have to drive in Monday's traffic.)

--- End quote ---

My mom always did her dinner on Sunday b/c she worked and didn't want to come home to a mess on Tuesday.  I do the same.  I had mine on Sunday night for 10 people.  I vegged all day yesterday and just started my clean up today!  It is  ALOT of work!

lilfox:

--- Quote from: JennJenn68 on September 28, 2012, 02:43:57 PM ---It's so confusing, with both countries having identically-named celebrations so many weeks apart. Since we're Canadian, my husband refers to the holiday of our neighbours from the south as "Yanksgiving" (tongue-in-cheek and not intended to be offensive) to differentiate.

<snip>

--- End quote ---

I'm in the US and back in October I told my coworkers I was going up to Canada for "Canadian Thanksgiving" with my in-laws.  One of my coworkers said, "Huh, do they really call it that?"  I said "well, no, they just call it Thanksgiving."   ;)

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