Author Topic: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?  (Read 11279 times)

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Mental Magpie

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How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« on: September 24, 2012, 02:08:31 PM »
An unfortunate situation has arisen at work.  I originally had my shift covered for Oct. 6; when that fell through I went to my supervisor.  After talking to him and the other breakfast server, who also happens to be my best friend, I still can't get the shift covered.  I e-mailed the general manager to see if she could help me work out something.  I explained to her that I have a test that day that I can't miss (it's the LSAT, if you're wondering; yes, it is more important to me than my job at this point) and offered what I thought was a possible solution.

Her first e-mail back to me felt like it had dismissed everything I had said.  Just before I was going to reply to it, I got another e-mail from her saying she was trying to work on it and asking me if I was available at all that day.  I replied yes, I will be able to make my bartender shift, just not the breakfast server one.  The next e-mail asked if I could even cover a little bit of my morning shift; I replied no, because I can't.

I have a feeling that she won't find anyone to be able to cover it, but what I pretty much am going to have to tell her is (but will put much nicer when I say it) is, "Well, I'm still not going to be there."  I realize that will probably get me written up (as a no-show) and/or leave me with no good references if I put in my 2 weeks and still don't show up if I'm scheduled that day.  I fully understand the consequences of my actions.  What I don't know how to do is tell this to general manager.

I was thinking something like this:

Dear GM,

I am sorry this situation has happened and even more sorry that I am going to put any of you in a bind, but as I mentioned, I cannot miss this test.  I know you worked hard to try to get that shift covered and I am sorry you weren't able to find anyone who could fill in.  However, I still will not be able to be at work that day.  I will turn in my two weeks notice immediately so that Supervisor can get the ball rolling on hiring someone else in hopes of getting that shift covered.  Again, I am sorry I am putting any of you in this position.

Sincerely,
Mental Magpie
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bopper

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2012, 02:12:12 PM »
Do you want to quit?

If not:

"Dear GM,

I am sorry this situation has happened and even more sorry that I am going to put any of you in a bind, but as I mentioned, I cannot miss this exam.  I know you worked hard to try to get that shift covered and I am sorry you weren't able to find anyone who could fill in.  However, I still will not be able to be at work that day.  After the exam I will be able to return to my regular schedule."

If they want to fire you, let them. Otherwise you could offer to tender your resignation. But don't quit unless you really want to.

AustenFan

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2012, 02:13:44 PM »
You're overthinking it.

You've already told them what you can do, so they know you won't be there for the breakfast shift. At this point I would drop it, it's not your problem. Are you putting in your notice over this? If so, I think that's an over reaction.

bopper

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2012, 02:16:59 PM »
Also I think the GM is trying to make it YOUR PROBLEM, where as you are telling them it is now THEIR PROBLEM.
If you are a good worker and they generally would want to keep you and you have given them sufficient notice, then they will keep you on. If they won't let you take off because of the LSAT (do they know what that is and why it is important?) and they would fire you over missing one time then your position was very tenuous to begin with.

Mental Magpie

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2012, 02:36:41 PM »
I've given them two weeks notice as far as when it came up that I wouldn't be able to be there.  Originally, I had the shift covered, but as soon as I found out that wouldn't work (it would put the other server into overtime), I e-mailed the general manager (which is still within the two weeks timeframe).

I think you're right, I am over thinking this.  I honestly don't think they would fire me over no-showing one day (I think my mind went there because it is going to be an extremely busy day and would make people want to tear out their hair if I didn't show up), and I will take a write up for it if I have to.  I guess my brain said, "Head off the firing by putting in your two weeks!" with a little bit of "If you put in your two weeks, they will be able to hire someone in the mean time to work that shift and then you won't get in trouble/a write up."  I was only going to put in my two weeks notice as a way of not getting fired (which now that I think about it probably wouldn't happen, especially because I have had no other problems) and of allowing them time to hire someone to cover the shift.

Technically it is kind of my problem since I didn't get the time off approved by my supervisor.  I see now where I am telling them it is their problem, though, and now I need to just stop worrying about it.  Either it gets covered or I get a write up, and I am okay with that.  As it will be my second write up ever, I think I can handle it.  Thanks for talking sense into me no matter that it only took a few posts.  Sometimes I think I cover all of the angles and just need a reminder that I haven't in order to see the light.
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Deetee

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2012, 02:38:42 PM »
Do you want to quit?

If not:

"Dear GM,

I am sorry this situation has happened and even more sorry that I am going to put any of you in a bind, but as I mentioned, I cannot miss this exam.  I know you worked hard to try to get that shift covered and I am sorry you weren't able to find anyone who could fill in.  However, I still will not be able to be at work that day.  After the exam I will be able to return to my regular schedule."

If they want to fire you, let them. Otherwise you could offer to tender your resignation. But don't quit unless you really want to.


I like this better, I might edit it and say


"Dear GM,

I am sorry this situation has happened and even more sorry that I am going to put any of you in a bind, but as I mentioned, I cannot miss this exam.  the LSAT exam is required for entrance to law schooland is only given 4 times a year. I will need to be there from 7:00 AM (note, I know it starts at 9:00, but you need to be there at least an hour early) until 5:00 PM  I know you worked hard to try to get that shift covered and I am sorry you weren't able to find anyone who could fill in.  However, I still will not be able to be at work that day.  After the exam I will be able to return to my regular schedule."



siamesecat2965

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2012, 02:59:59 PM »
Is it even necesary to put it in writing to the GM? if not, I wouldn't even bother.  And if you do, keep it short and sweet. DOn't apologize, don't make excuses.  Simply let them know that you are not available for that shift, and while you tried to find coverage, your backup fell through.  I don't even think its necesary to say you'll lbe back to your regular schedule since its just one day, and that kind of goes without saying you will be.

Also, had you asked for this day off in advance? Not trying to be snarky, but it seems like for soemthing like this you might have known the date more than 2 weeks in advance and maybe should have put it for it as soon as you knew.

I know with my PT job; I put in my time off as soon as I know, sometimes months in advance, and don't usually have any issues with getting approved for the time off.  But if this is the only issue you've had, and you are otherwise a reliable employee, I'd just let it go, and let them deal with it.

Mental Magpie

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2012, 03:34:31 PM »
I didn't put in for the time off because I had it covered (normal practice at my job to say to the supervisor, "I cleared it with the other server and she's going to work for me on the 12th.").  I only put in for the "time off" when I found out it was no longer covered.  I don't care what is normal practice, I'm not doing that again and will put in for time off even if that day is already covered my by availability schedule; lesson learned.  I also only registered for the LSAT on September 3 and promptly asked the other server to cover my shift that day, when she agreed.

As far as being necessary, no, I don't know that it is, but I wanted to be prepared in case it was.
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siamesecat2965

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2012, 03:47:03 PM »
I didn't put in for the time off because I had it covered (normal practice at my job to say to the supervisor, "I cleared it with the other server and she's going to work for me on the 12th.").  I only put in for the "time off" when I found out it was no longer covered.  I don't care what is normal practice, I'm not doing that again and will put in for time off even if that day is already covered my by availability schedule; lesson learned.  I also only registered for the LSAT on September 3 and promptly asked the other server to cover my shift that day, when she agreed.

As far as being necessary, no, I don't know that it is, but I wanted to be prepared in case it was.

Aha - in that case, it seems like its not really your issue anymore.  I know at my job if I got someone to cover for me, and THEY were not able to work after all, it then becomes their responsibility or the manager's to find coverage.  It seems like you did everything you could to find someone to work for you.

GirlyGirl

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2012, 05:54:15 PM »
I've given them two weeks notice as far as when it came up that I wouldn't be able to be there.  Originally, I had the shift covered, but as soon as I found out that wouldn't work (it would put the other server into overtime), I e-mailed the general manager (which is still within the two weeks timeframe).

If the problem is that the other server will go into overtime covering your shift, could you take one of her shifts earlier in the week?

The Wild One, Forever

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2012, 08:41:24 PM »
I didn't put in for the time off because I had it covered (normal practice at my job to say to the supervisor, "I cleared it with the other server and she's going to work for me on the 12th.").  I only put in for the "time off" when I found out it was no longer covered.  I don't care what is normal practice, I'm not doing that again and will put in for time off even if that day is already covered my by availability schedule; lesson learned.  I also only registered for the LSAT on September 3 and promptly asked the other server to cover my shift that day, when she agreed.

As far as being necessary, no, I don't know that it is, but I wanted to be prepared in case it was.

Aha - in that case, it seems like its not really your issue anymore.  I know at my job if I got someone to cover for me, and THEY were not able to work after all, it then becomes their responsibility or the manager's to find coverage.  It seems like you did everything you could to find someone to work for you.

Not necessarily.  As I learned during my stint at restaurant management, (thank goodness that's over!), our policy was that any schedule changes had to be approved and signed off on by a manager.  I don't know that this is policy where Mental Magpie is employed, but it kind of sounds so, due to the fact that she is still worried about having the shift covered. 
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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2012, 08:47:28 PM »
I think resigning from your job is an overly dramatic response to the situation.   Be clear and honest about the situation and what you can and can't do, but there's no need to jump to that step.   If they decide that they no longer want you employed it will be clear.   
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Mental Magpie

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2012, 09:12:35 PM »
I've given them two weeks notice as far as when it came up that I wouldn't be able to be there.  Originally, I had the shift covered, but as soon as I found out that wouldn't work (it would put the other server into overtime), I e-mailed the general manager (which is still within the two weeks timeframe).

If the problem is that the other server will go into overtime covering your shift, could you take one of her shifts earlier in the week?

It doesn't matter anymore because she got tickets to a football game that morning and now isn't available at all.  Otherwise, that was my plan...or not taking paid time off and just taking a day off.


I think resigning from your job is an overly dramatic response to the situation.   Be clear and honest about the situation and what you can and can't do, but there's no need to jump to that step.   If they decide that they no longer want you employed it will be clear.   

As I explained, resigning was a bit so that they would have time to hire someone else to cover the shift (the non-dramatic part) and a bit to stop them from being able to fire me because I was already quitting kind of thing (only dramatic in the sense that I was thinking they would fire me over my first write up).    Otherwise, I don't understand why you think it is dramatic?  Could you please explain?
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JenJay

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #13 on: September 24, 2012, 09:26:10 PM »
If I understand, you initially didn't request the day off because you had arranged for someone to take the shift? Did you clear that with anyone in management when you made the arrangement with the lady who was going to take the shift?

If so - I would contact whomever cleared it and say "It has come to my attention that Lady is no longer willing to cover my shift on Oct 6, per our agreement on Date. I have asked around in an attempt to find someone else to cover but I'm afraid nobody else is available. I cannot reschedule my test." Don't take any of the blame since the manager authorized the switch, it's now between them and your coworker.

If not, well, I'm afraid you goofed. It really stinks because you tried to do the right thing in being proactive and getting it covered, but you got burned. Live and learn  :-\. I saw that happen to one of my coworkers - she was sick but rather than call in sick and leave us stranded she called another coworker and asked if he'd cover her. He agreed, so she called us and said "I won't be there but he will." Unfortunately he never showed. SHE got in big trouble for a no call/no show. Obviously going forward you know you can't count on that lady to keep her word when she offers to cover for you.  Explain to your manager that you initially had the shift covered and that's why you didn't request the time off, you realize that was a mistake, and in the future you will put in an official request as soon as possible. As someone else suggested, offer to switch shifts with a different coworker (not football lady) so they don't go into overtime, if that's one of your manager's main concerns with juggling schedules.

siamesecat2965

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Re: How to say "Well I'm still not going to be there"?
« Reply #14 on: September 24, 2012, 09:59:48 PM »
I saw that happen to one of my coworkers - she was sick but rather than call in sick and leave us stranded she called another coworker and asked if he'd cover her. He agreed, so she called us and said "I won't be there but he will." Unfortunately he never showed. SHE got in big trouble for a no call/no show. Obviously going forward you know you can't count on that lady to keep her word when she offers to cover for you. 

Not sure if this is the reason, but at my job, if you need to get someone to work for you or switch shifts, once you find someone, you have to call the GM, and the person working for you also has to call, and just let the GM know, yes, I'm working for so and so on this date.  This way, everyone knows who is now responsible for that time, and if the replacement fails to show up, the original employee isn't on the hoook