Author Topic: college adviser consultant-ever had one?  (Read 5784 times)

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RegionMom

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college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« on: September 27, 2012, 10:59:45 AM »
My kids' high school has two college advisers for less than 100 seniors.  We just received an e-mail warning parents that if we choose to go outside of school and  hire a college adviser consultant for our child, to please make sure they are qualified and ethical.

I have never before heard of such a job!  Is this like a personal recruiter for your child?  I assume it is a paid position.

I want to ask around and see if other parents are doing this, and how much of an edge it gives.  Does it add to scholarship money?  Was it worth it if you did it?

My junior son is most likely going to be valedictorian, and will apply early acceptance to a private college.
My younger daughter has no clue what she wants to do, but is very good at math and science, and will be in the top percentage of her graduating class.

Is this something I should do for him?  Wait until she is a junior?  For both?  Neither?

And, for etiquette, parents and students are asked to fill out on-line forms before meeting the on-campus college adviser, after the October PSAT testing is done.  If I decide to check out a consultant, do I tell the adviser that her e-mail is what told me of this never before by me heard of position?

Do I grab as much info as I can for my son, or do I let go and just see what comes for college in the way of scholarships?

Thanks!
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Zilla

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2012, 11:12:49 AM »
If he will have good grades and excellent PSAT scores, then you might want to consider hiring someone to research where he could get the most "bang" for his grades in terms of scholarships, area of study etc.  There might be alot more out there that is available that your son can take advantage of.  I would do the same for your daughter when she is a junior.


Snipped:
And, for etiquette, parents and students are asked to fill out on-line forms before meeting the on-campus college adviser, after the October PSAT testing is done.  If I decide to check out a consultant, do I tell the adviser that her e-mail is what told me of this never before by me heard of position?


As for the email to the adviser, why would you tell her that you never heard of this till her email?
« Last Edit: September 27, 2012, 11:22:54 AM by Zilla »

WillyNilly

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2012, 11:20:56 AM »
I think if you have the money and the inclination to hire someone, go ahead.  So long as they are reputable (as you were advised to look into) I don't see how they can hurt.  Although I must admit it seems a bit, I don't know... off somehow to hire someone to help you get scholarships, but that's just me.

And, for etiquette, parents and students are asked to fill out on-line forms before meeting the on-campus college adviser, after the October PSAT testing is done.  If I decide to check out a consultant, do I tell the adviser that her e-mail is what told me of this never before by me heard of position?

Tone is hard to read through the internet, but this bit ^ (and admittedly your past posts on your kid's education are influencing me) comes across as hostile.  Are you mad you never heard of this service before?  Do you think it was wrong for you to become informed about this service in the way you did?

Yvaine

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2012, 11:23:48 AM »
From what you say about your kids' grades etc., they will do fine. The school's email sounds more like it's trying to warn people of scams than trying to imply that everyone needs a college advisor consultant. I would bet there are a lot of con artists out there promising miraculous results. 

artk2002

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2012, 11:25:13 AM »
Outside advisers are very common at my kids' school. Yes, it is a paid position -- they can make a lot of money.

My son is a junior, but we're not even considering a consultant at this time. He has a tutor already helping him work through some learning and organizational issues and that tutor is giving college advice. Plus the school has good on-campus advisers. Our one concern there is that they may try to push him towards Ivy League type schools (his HS has a *very* good track record of placement in schools like that), where Ivy League is certainly not where his talents and interests lie.

As for letting the on-campus adviser know, I don't know why you wouldn't mention it. "Thanks for letting us know about the outside advisers" lets your on-campus person know that they've helped. Telling you about opportunities like that is what they're supposed to be doing!

Here's a short article about private college counselors. You may want to do more research using that term and "independent education(al) consultant".
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sourwolf

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2012, 11:25:35 AM »
I think if you have the money and the inclination to hire someone, go ahead.  So long as they are reputable (as you were advised to look into) I don't see how they can hurt.  Although I must admit it seems a bit, I don't know... off somehow to hire someone to help you get scholarships, but that's just me.

And, for etiquette, parents and students are asked to fill out on-line forms before meeting the on-campus college adviser, after the October PSAT testing is done.  If I decide to check out a consultant, do I tell the adviser that her e-mail is what told me of this never before by me heard of position?

Tone is hard to read through the internet, but this bit ^ (and admittedly your past posts on your kid's education are influencing me) comes across as hostile.  Are you mad you never heard of this service before?  Do you think it was wrong for you to become informed about this service in the way you did?

I have to agree.  Not only that but if he's a junior this is the time you should be hearing about these sorts of things (if you haven't already been doing research on your own.) And.....you did, I'm not sure what the problem is? 

Yvaine posted as I did and I want to add I agree with her as well - the school isn't telling you about it because they think it's a good idea, they are trying to make sure you don't get taken in by a scam (which unfortunately many of these services are.)

RegionMom

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2012, 11:31:03 AM »
I guess I would tell just to be honest?  It might come up in conversation at the conference with the adviser, and I want all bases covered as we set son on the path to college.  If two adults do the same professional thing for one college, the college might see it as double-dipping? 
I really do not know how this works.

WillyNilly, I agree, it does seem off and odd to hire someone to get scholarships.  I always thought it was on merit, and we just needed to be diligent in finding the extra money.  I have heard of scholarships for family heritage, being left-handed, an Eagle Scout, let alone musicianship and grades and athletics and standardized test scores. 

Since DH and I attended large public high schools and never met with our counselor, this is new territory for us.

And no, I am not mad about not knowing about the service, and I am still not sure I would take advantage or it, since money is tight, as usual.  Pay money to get money when DS might get money on his own anyway? 
I am actually surprised such a service exists, but since this is a private high school, I know there is money for parents to pay for special advantages. 

As driven as DS is to succeed, and all the merits he has earned on his own, I do not want another child to obtain the same benefits just because their parents paid for it over their child's lesser work ethic.

But, that may be how the world works.  sigh...
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audrey1962

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2012, 11:35:59 AM »
From what you say about your kids' grades etc., they will do fine. The school's email sounds more like it's trying to warn people of scams than trying to imply that everyone needs a college advisor consultant. I would bet there are a lot of con artists out there promising miraculous results.

This. That was my first thought, too. There are a lot of scam artists out there trying to sell information you can find on your own for free. Between the Internet and the library, your children should be able to conduct this research on their own without incurring any fees.

Yvaine

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #8 on: September 27, 2012, 11:36:22 AM »
WillyNilly, I agree, it does seem off and odd to hire someone to get scholarships.  I always thought it was on merit, and we just needed to be diligent in finding the extra money.  I have heard of scholarships for family heritage, being left-handed, an Eagle Scout, let alone musicianship and grades and athletics and standardized test scores. 

I remember even when I was in high school, back when dinosaurs walked the earth, they would warn us that there are people who will charge you a huge fee "to find you scholarships" and then dig up the exact same info you could dig up easily on your own.

I don't know what you mean by double-dipping. It sounds like one is an official advisor employed by the college and the other would be an outside firm hired personally by you or your son.

ETA: It sounds like you may be upset that this email may have informed other parents about this service as well, and so their kids might gain an unfair advantage from it? I wouldn't worry. If he does in fact become valedictorian, that will be a big advantage in and of itself.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2012, 11:40:14 AM by Yvaine »

Bexx27

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2012, 11:40:05 AM »
These consultants have been around at least since I was applying to colleges over a decade ago. I didn't use one, but I know people who did. In my experience, they are most useful for kids whose schools don't offer much in the way of college counseling services. If your kids' school has college advisers who are able to meet with them individually a few times during the admissions process, a private consultant is probably not going to provide much additional help.

They are not recruiters in the sense of advocating for clients. They don't have any pull with colleges or any insight into specific admissions decisions. They help with things like deciding where to apply and tailoring applications to emphasize the accomplishments schools are looking for. Basically, they're more comparable to career counselors than recruiters.
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Hmmmmm

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2012, 11:50:05 AM »
In my experience the outside consultants do work that you can do, but may not want to.  Put a schedule together of dates for application and scholarship deadlines, reading and proofing college essays(and in some cases almost writing them).  Help your kids select colleges to visit based on their interest maybe even help in picking majors.  They will also help you run down available scholarships. 

Few of our friends are using them much anymore as so much of the info can easily be researched online.  But it does take time so if short on time, it might be helpfull.

Moray

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2012, 12:03:50 PM »
*snip*
My junior son is most likely going to be valedictorian, and will apply early acceptance to a private college.
*snip*

Wow! That's pretty exciting. How did you find out so soon? Most schools don't choose their valedictorians until a little before graduation.
Utah

siamesecat2965

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #12 on: September 27, 2012, 12:25:55 PM »
Back when I was in HS (early 1980's) I don't recall anyone I know using a college counselor, although I'm sure they were around.  But my HS was pretty competitive, and considered one of the top 10 in the state.  If I recall, the guidance counselors also served as college advisors, and so on, and they had a lot of resources as our college acceptance and attendance rates were quite high, and they wanted to keep it that way.  But it was mainly advice and guidance, trying to figure out what schools, programs and other options fit each students needs best.

sourwolf

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #13 on: September 27, 2012, 01:07:34 PM »


As driven as DS is to succeed, and all the merits he has earned on his own, I do not want another child to obtain the same benefits just because their parents paid for it over their child's lesser work ethic.

But, that may be how the world works.  sigh...

Ouch! Really? I find it hard to believe you know the exact work ethic of every student at your sons school let alone that it's lesser than that of your son. For your information the only benefit they could possibly obtain is finding out about a scholarship. the child with the lesser work ethic would still be the one completing whatever essays or applications are required for the scholarship. If their work ethic is so low you will have nothing to worry about.

Wonderflonium

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Re: college adviser consultant-ever had one?
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2012, 01:09:05 PM »
As driven as DS is to succeed, and all the merits he has earned on his own, I do not want another child to obtain the same benefits just because their parents paid for it over their child's lesser work ethic.

I have to say, that comes across as rather ... honestly, as rather snotty. Some people have more money than time. It may be worth it for a parent to pay someone else to do this so their child can concentrate on academics, have time for extracurricular activities, help with siblings, hold down a job, volunteer, or any number of things.
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