Author Topic: genealogy  (Read 536 times)

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CLE_Girl

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genealogy
« on: October 05, 2012, 04:38:05 PM »
Anyone else into genealogy and tracking your family history? 

I recently made some strides with my family tree...

1) I think I have Revolutionary War connections now through 3 branch's of my family (Paternal Grandma's Father, Maternal Grandma's Mother and Father) - I knew I was eligible for the DAR, but only on one line (Maternal GMa's mother)

2) I am white, but 4 generations ago, my Great-Great Grandfather (on my paternal grandma's side) is listed as Mulatto in census records and 8 generations back my ancestor was a slave (his freedom was later bought by his wife)

Anyone else have a cool family history?

Sirius

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Re: genealogy
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2012, 04:41:39 PM »
When I was at my aunt's house earlier this year I found lots of documents to and by my paternal great-grandparents and great-great grandparents.  Some of these were fascinating reading.  I also found documents relating to the early history of Pomeroy, Washington.  The part of me fascinated by genealogy was thrilled, but the part of me that had to dispose of all this stuff (I brought most of it home) wasn't too thrilled.

 

Cami

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Re: genealogy
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2012, 05:30:31 PM »
My dh is quite the genealogist and finds my lack of interest frustrating, especially since -- in his mind -- I have the more interesting background. (I'm from a long line of New Yorkers --dating far back into the early 18th century -- and with the melting pot of that area, I have many different ethnic origins in my veins.)  That said, there are a few pieces of info that intrigue even me:

1. Part of my father's family hails from Ireland. There is a "family saga" written by an aged immigrant ancestor of mine detailing the emigration from Ireland to NY, complete with a sunken ship off the Azores, an enforced sojourn in Portugal, followed by an arrival in NYC with  nothing but the clothes on their back. They were apparently SHOCKED to find that their brothers who had preceded them by a year were not waiting in  NYC for them. They ended up being hired as maids for a hotel in upstate NY.

2. My maternal grandmother and her siblings would insist that they had some  Native American blood in them because some of them had darker complexions -- being a long-time NYC family, I privately considered that highly unlikely and figured that we probably had some African-American heritage. Turns out that my grandmother's grandfather was listed as mulatto in the census and that we are (somehow, I don't remember) descended from the 18th century union of a white NY man who had a second family with his -- as his will describes her -- "slave woman Rose". Rose and her children by him were freed upon his death and given considerable sums in the will (which also detailed what his legal white wife and legitimate children would receive). The family was then listed as mulatto in the census thereafter. At one point in the 19th century a white British woman (recent emigre to the US) married one of the men and it's clear from the census that they were living in a neighborhood of people of color. I wonder how they met and married and what obstacles they faced. The designation of mulatto changed only with my great-grandfather (my grandmother's father).

3. MOST shocking of all? The information that my paternal grandmother's family were a bunch of jocks and jockettes. I can attest that NONE of us inherited those genes.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2012, 05:32:18 PM by Cami »

doodlemor

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Re: genealogy
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2012, 06:11:52 PM »
We recently learned that a gr-gr [or more] uncle was an illegal alien, let's call him Olaf. 

Olaf's family had already moved to the US mid-west with all of the proper paperwork.  Olaf shipped out of Sweden as a seaman.  He jumped ship when his vessel reached the port of New York, and went west on the train to join his family.  As far as I know he was never caught, and is still here in some cemetery.

CharlieBraun

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Re: genealogy
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2012, 06:52:26 PM »
Hey there - I started a somewhat related thread - had some good responses! 

http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=120431.0
"We ate the pies."

Danika

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Re: genealogy
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2012, 06:55:56 PM »
I'd heard that someone in my paternal grandmother's ancestry was a pirate. I later found out that many generations back some (Caucasian, FWIW) generations lived in Jamaica. I assume it was one of them.

I've always had bad allergies and wondered how my ancestors faired back in times when farming was a more popular lifestyle. But now, I've learned that all of the ancestors I can trace were city slickers. Maybe they all had hay and animal allergies too?

And back around 1900, when divorces were allegedly unpopular, there were more divorces in my family than in the rest of the 1900s. Apparently, I come from a long line of outspoken, strong women who take no junk and filed for divorce even though it wasn't a popular decision in society.

drafter_lady

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Re: genealogy
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2012, 01:32:38 AM »
On my paternal grandmother's side is a great-something or other grandfather who was one of Paul Revere's men. He rode from the battle of Lexington to alert the people in New Hampshire border towns about the battle and helped to form the militia there.

Sirius

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Re: genealogy
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2012, 10:33:00 AM »
I'd heard that someone in my paternal grandmother's ancestry was a pirate. I later found out that many generations back some (Caucasian, FWIW) generations lived in Jamaica. I assume it was one of them.

I've always had bad allergies and wondered how my ancestors faired back in times when farming was a more popular lifestyle. But now, I've learned that all of the ancestors I can trace were city slickers. Maybe they all had hay and animal allergies too?

And back around 1900, when divorces were allegedly unpopular, there were more divorces in my family than in the rest of the 1900s. Apparently, I come from a long line of outspoken, strong women who take no junk and filed for divorce even though it wasn't a popular decision in society.

My great-grandma divorced her second husband because he mistreated her.  This was in the late 1930s and she supported herself with a farm and secretarial work.