Author Topic: Overhearing snarky commentary by store staff over choice in products  (Read 6508 times)

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Betelnut

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Re: Overhearing snarky commentary by store staff over choice in products
« Reply #45 on: October 06, 2012, 12:02:23 PM »
I think that is very useful for sales clerks to know that you are using the item/material for a craft/sewing project.  Having that information would totally change how they can help you and also how they could troubleshoot/solve your problem or issue.

I am a librarian by trade and it is part of the reference interview process to find out as much as possible about why/what the customer needs the information.  You would not believe how often a person will say, "Do you have a book about Lincoln?" when all they really want to know is the name of Lincoln's wife (for an imaginary example).  That is, people can be distressingly vague about what they really want and need. 

I see this situation as very similar.  The sales clerks were horribly rude, I totally agree with that.  I would never say they weren't.  But being coy about what the material is being used for is not helpful either.
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Acadianna

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Re: Overhearing snarky commentary by store staff over choice in products
« Reply #46 on: October 06, 2012, 12:26:38 PM »
What happens if you tell the salesperson up front that the article of clothing is for a costume?  At least it would explain why the white dress of death is a good thing.   :)  Granted, I've gotten some odd looks at Home Depot when I've explained that the PVC pipe will holding a werewolf instead of water.

I had a somewhat similar experience with PVC pipe.  I was making items called "whisper phones" (they look sort of like old-fashioned telephone receivers).  These allow students to read aloud to themselves  in class by whispering into the phones, which magnify their voices in their own ears so they don't disturb other students.

(For teachers who might want to use this idea -- you put small jointed PVC pieces on the ends of 6" lengths, to make the mouth and ear parts.)

So I bought a 12-foot length of PVC and asked for it to be cut into 6" lengths.  (I was happy to pay for the extra cuts, because I knew they gave you only so many for free.)  You can imagine the puzzled and somewhat annoyed look I got from the salesperson -- until I explained what I was making.