Author Topic: Scone Help  (Read 1726 times)

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Nikko-chan

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Scone Help
« on: October 07, 2012, 10:44:06 PM »
This saga started with a lemon-poppyseed scone (which was delicious by the way). After I ate it I thought "I can make scones!" and decided to try making savory ones. I used this recipe:

http://www.laraferroni.com/2008/01/26/savory-cream-scones-with-cheese-and-bacon/

They tasted delicious, and you could taste each ingredient (the cheeses, the bacon, and the scallions i put in as well).

The problem? they refused to cook in the middle. One of the reviewers had this problem too, so I am thinking that maybe it is the recipe. Does anyone here have a basic savory scone recipe that is foolproof and that I can add my own things to? Namely bacon, and the cheeses and some scallions. Also.... How dense should my scones be? How dry? How do I know if I have done it right?

Ehellions i need your help!
« Last Edit: October 08, 2012, 01:14:05 AM by Nikko-chan »

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Scone Help
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2012, 11:19:00 AM »
My scones just use milk but I had the problem of them not cooking in the middle.  The whole batch was supposed to be rolled into one ball and then pressed flat into a circle on the baking sheet.  So I started cutting the dough in half and forming two balls, and hence two round scones.  I'd score the top of the dough with a knife and then didn't break it apart until serving it.

I would think the cheeses would be helping to keep it from cooking all the way through.  I'd try making the dough a bit thinner through the middle and see if it helps.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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alkira6

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Re: Scone Help
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2012, 11:59:37 AM »
I do two things since every scone recipe that I have tried has this same problem

1. Make two balls of dough, flatten them and place them in the pan.
2. use your fist or a saucer to flatten the dough in the middle again once in the pan.  There should be a shallow impression left after you finish pressing.  Pop in the oven to cook immediately, as scone dough is aparently some sort of amoeba like organism that will fill the middle back in again if you leave it alone for more than 2-3 minutes.

Pippen

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Re: Scone Help
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2012, 03:06:37 PM »
OK this sounds bizarre but it is the best scones recipe I have ever used. When they say lemonade they mean something like Sprite. They arent sweet, well maybe just a bit but it works well for savoury ones as well.

http://allrecipes.com.au/recipe/9474/easy-peasy-lemonade-scones.aspx

Nikko-chan

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Re: Scone Help
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2012, 07:14:42 PM »
Pippen I saw those.... they look delicious... and i have to admit i thought the lemonade meant you know.... lemonade. *blush*

Thanks for all of the suggestions so far guys... :)

greencat

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Re: Scone Help
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2012, 10:55:24 PM »
I didn't have that issue when I made scones, though I've since lost the recipe - are you letting them cool completely before you cut into them?  They tend to cook a little more in the middle during that time.  Also, since you added scallions, you added slightly to the moisture content...maybe that had some effect?

oz diva

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Re: Scone Help
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2012, 10:59:53 PM »
OK this sounds bizarre but it is the best scones recipe I have ever used. When they say lemonade they mean something like Sprite. They arent sweet, well maybe just a bit but it works well for savoury ones as well.

http://allrecipes.com.au/recipe/9474/easy-peasy-lemonade-scones.aspx
Yes, that's my favourite scone recipe too.

Victoria

Nikko-chan

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Re: Scone Help
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2012, 11:00:18 PM »
I didn't have that issue when I made scones, though I've since lost the recipe - are you letting them cool completely before you cut into them?  They tend to cook a little more in the middle during that time.  Also, since you added scallions, you added slightly to the moisture content...maybe that had some effect?

See? Reasons like that are why I am bad at baking.... any idea how to offset that? maybe extra flour?

Also, I did pre-cut them before placing them onto the sheet.

greencat

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Re: Scone Help
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2012, 11:23:20 PM »
Let them sit, then cut - try that before you try to alter the flour content.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Scone Help
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2012, 11:11:19 AM »
I'd reduce the cream a little before adding more flour.  Adding more flour might change the texture.

My recipe is a bit different and not quite as easy as the easy peasy one.

2 cups all purpose flour
1 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp baking powder
1/2 cup shortening - I use oil with great success
1 cup grated cheese
1 egg
3/4 cup milk

Mix the dry ingredients together.  Cut the shortening or oil in with a pastry blender.  Stir in grated cheese.  Add the egg to the milk and mix well.  Pour over the dry ingredients, reserving about 1/4 cup.  If dough is still a bit dry, add a little more of the milk mixture but try to reserve a tbsp or two for brushing over the scones.  Dump dough out on a floured counter and knead gently about 10 times.  Cut the dough in half and form into two balls.  Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment or a silpat and flatten the dough into two rounds.  Score with a sharp knife into 6 and brush the tops with the remaining milk mixture.  Bake in a preheated 425F oven for ~15 minutes, until golden brown.  I've also successfully made these using a 2" to 3" round cutters instead of the two big rounds.  I reduce the cooking time by a couple of minutes.

You can replace the cheese with about a cup of any fruit you like.  I've used wild blueberries, currants, raisins, coursely chopped cranberries - I'll add some grated orange rind with the cranberries.  Usually, when I'm using the fruit, I don't use all the milk.  You'll get the hang of what the texture should feel like and know when to quit adding it.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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Julian

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Re: Scone Help
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2012, 07:29:41 PM »
That recipe looked pretty liquid-heavy to me.

Disclaimer - I'm a scone guesstimator.  I never measure, I use what looks right...  the dough mixture should be able to roll into a ball without being sticky.

Another hint that the recipe doesn't mention is to preheat the baking tray.  That might help to give the scones a chance to start cooking before they get into the oven.

I also heat the milk/shortening (usually butter) in the microwave before mixing, till the butter is melted.  The extra warmth seems to help them both cook better and rise better.