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Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 1869381 times)

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Mediancat

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8235 on: Yesterday at 07:48:52 AM »
Why do I suspect that your boss actually is going to tell you to train them anyway, because even if the GM screwed up, the deadline is non-negotiable?

Rob
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siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8236 on: Yesterday at 11:41:47 AM »
I believe it and she'll probably do it again.

I have clients like this -- so technologically incompetent that they create extreme inconvenience for themselves by doing it wrong and then complain that "the process" is too difficult and takes too long. I send PDF proofs for most projects. The free version of Adobe Reader, which 99.99% of computer users are familiar with and have already on their computer, allows for marking changes directly to a PDF and emailing it back to me. I've had many people print out the PDF, write their changes on the print and then interoffice mail it back to me or they'll scan it and email it back. I have a created a tutorial for them that I send at the first sign of this with such basic instructions and screen shots that it might be insulting to a more competent person (but I do keep the tone cheery and helpful). That usually solves the problem.

I'd do something similar to this store manager -- send her written instructions with screen captures so basic that a 4-year-old could follow them; "First, save the email attachment to your desktop. Then, open the spreadsheet by double clicking your mouse on the file icon. Then..."

I usually use the "ELI5" rule. (Explain like I'm five)

I gave up with one of the managers here. I just take his handwritten spreadsheets and type them up to email to him. He forwards the email to the office manager and tells her which column he wants the data sorted by. She does that then emails it back. But she has to change the name. If it's the same name he insists she didn't do it.

*whimper*

How on earth does someone remain so technologically incompetent in this day in age?

they do, sadly. my one boss is like that. we had an ancient printer, which those who use it were told, once it dies, that's it, as they encourage us all to print on the copiers scattered around.

so she asks where I print and i tell her "copier #x" she then asks what the name of it is! "um copier #x" then she couldn't figure out HOW to add the printer!  I left at that point.

2littlemonkeys

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8237 on: Yesterday at 12:01:40 PM »
**Snip**

*whimper*

How on earth does someone remain so technologically incompetent in this day in age?

I worked for someone like this once (she committed PD for very different reasons, namely embezzling).  She was my age but couldn't seem to get the hang of working on a computer.  She knew email sort of but had difficulty printing or using any of the other applications.  She hand wrote reports and gave them to me to type up.  I would do so and email it back to her and she would read the digital copy.  If she had to make a small change, like add a space or a comma, she would email it back to me to print for her and hand write the changes.  I eventually started just printing the hard copy for her instead of emailing it.

It was all so strange to me.

Carotte

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8238 on: Yesterday at 12:17:59 PM »
I believe it and she'll probably do it again.

I have clients like this -- so technologically incompetent that they create extreme inconvenience for themselves by doing it wrong and then complain that "the process" is too difficult and takes too long. I send PDF proofs for most projects. The free version of Adobe Reader, which 99.99% of computer users are familiar with and have already on their computer, allows for marking changes directly to a PDF and emailing it back to me. I've had many people print out the PDF, write their changes on the print and then interoffice mail it back to me or they'll scan it and email it back. I have a created a tutorial for them that I send at the first sign of this with such basic instructions and screen shots that it might be insulting to a more competent person (but I do keep the tone cheery and helpful). That usually solves the problem.

I'd do something similar to this store manager -- send her written instructions with screen captures so basic that a 4-year-old could follow them; "First, save the email attachment to your desktop. Then, open the spreadsheet by double clicking your mouse on the file icon. Then..."

I usually use the "ELI5" rule. (Explain like I'm five)

I gave up with one of the managers here. I just take his handwritten spreadsheets and type them up to email to him. He forwards the email to the office manager and tells her which column he wants the data sorted by. She does that then emails it back. But she has to change the name. If it's the same name he insists she didn't do it.

*whimper*

How on earth does someone remain so technologically incompetent in this day in age?

they do, sadly. my one boss is like that. we had an ancient printer, which those who use it were told, once it dies, that's it, as they encourage us all to print on the copiers scattered around.

so she asks where I print and i tell her "copier #x" she then asks what the name of it is! "um copier #x" then she couldn't figure out HOW to add the printer!  I left at that point.

To be fair, it's an unknown fact that installing/adding a copier or a printer is only easy if you are not instaling it for yourself :)
The last printer I dealt with, took like one minute to install on a Linux machine, took 15min and multiple expletives to instal on my recent windows PC.

HoneyBee42

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8239 on: Yesterday at 12:45:11 PM »
I believe it and she'll probably do it again.

I have clients like this -- so technologically incompetent that they create extreme inconvenience for themselves by doing it wrong and then complain that "the process" is too difficult and takes too long. I send PDF proofs for most projects. The free version of Adobe Reader, which 99.99% of computer users are familiar with and have already on their computer, allows for marking changes directly to a PDF and emailing it back to me. I've had many people print out the PDF, write their changes on the print and then interoffice mail it back to me or they'll scan it and email it back. I have a created a tutorial for them that I send at the first sign of this with such basic instructions and screen shots that it might be insulting to a more competent person (but I do keep the tone cheery and helpful). That usually solves the problem.

I'd do something similar to this store manager -- send her written instructions with screen captures so basic that a 4-year-old could follow them; "First, save the email attachment to your desktop. Then, open the spreadsheet by double clicking your mouse on the file icon. Then..."

I usually use the "ELI5" rule. (Explain like I'm five)

I gave up with one of the managers here. I just take his handwritten spreadsheets and type them up to email to him. He forwards the email to the office manager and tells her which column he wants the data sorted by. She does that then emails it back. But she has to change the name. If it's the same name he insists she didn't do it.

*whimper*

How on earth does someone remain so technologically incompetent in this day in age?

they do, sadly. my one boss is like that. we had an ancient printer, which those who use it were told, once it dies, that's it, as they encourage us all to print on the copiers scattered around.

so she asks where I print and i tell her "copier #x" she then asks what the name of it is! "um copier #x" then she couldn't figure out HOW to add the printer!  I left at that point.

To be fair, it's an unknown fact that installing/adding a copier or a printer is only easy if you are not instaling it for yourself :)
The last printer I dealt with, took like one minute to install on a Linux machine, took 15min and multiple expletives to instal on my recent windows PC.
And sometimes there can be all kinds of extraneous stuff that comes before the printer name ... like at my job, there's the printers that we use, but you have to put in about 20 characters (letters and numbers) just to get down to the part of the list where these printers are found.  Pain in the neck, but once it's set up, it's easy (and you can copy/paste to get the others nearby so it's only the first one that's a pain).

Kiwipinball

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8240 on: Yesterday at 01:09:44 PM »
Yes, adding printers can be a huge pain.

On the bosses struggling with technology - one former boss didn't know how to save Word documents, but had figured out how to e-mail them directly to herself, so that's how she saved them if she had to work on a document. She didn't very often (that's why she had support staff) - at most 1-2 times per month. I offered to teach her how to save them (she was very intelligent and could have learned easily) but it wasn't worth it to her. Fair enough, she didn't make anyone else's job harder for them by refusing to learn.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8241 on: Yesterday at 01:14:51 PM »
Yes, adding printers can be a huge pain.

On the bosses struggling with technology - one former boss didn't know how to save Word documents, but had figured out how to e-mail them directly to herself, so that's how she saved them if she had to work on a document. She didn't very often (that's why she had support staff) - at most 1-2 times per month. I offered to teach her how to save them (she was very intelligent and could have learned easily) but it wasn't worth it to her. Fair enough, she didn't make anyone else's job harder for them by refusing to learn.

I agree it can be tricky, but Our IT dept though, has it set up, so its pretty much idiot-proof. You literally just click on a button, and choose the printer, the name of which I'd already told her. She is completely clueless about anything electronic. this was just one in a long list of very easy computer related things she couldn't grasp.

wordgirl

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8242 on: Yesterday at 01:17:33 PM »
It is strange how people have mental blocks when it comes to technology, often very specific types of technology.

There was one former boss who was excellent at dealing with a very fast-paced, demanding job that included overseeing about 50 employees in four locations, and keeping about 15 balls in the air at any given time. He oversaw some massive technology overhauls that had been long overdue.

But the man could not fax. He could not fax! He would come stand in the door of my office with a piece of paper in his hand and a pitiful look.

LazyDaisy

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8243 on: Yesterday at 01:55:14 PM »
It is strange how people have mental blocks when it comes to technology, often very specific types of technology.

There was one former boss who was excellent at dealing with a very fast-paced, demanding job that included overseeing about 50 employees in four locations, and keeping about 15 balls in the air at any given time. He oversaw some massive technology overhauls that had been long overdue.

But the man could not fax. He could not fax! He would come stand in the door of my office with a piece of paper in his hand and a pitiful look.
I can sort of understand that -- we have to put signs on the all-in-one printer/scanner/fax machines about how to dial out (9 first then the number) and face up or face down. Without the signs, I just don't fax often enough to remember and different machines have different set ups.
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Tierrainney

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8244 on: Yesterday at 05:37:50 PM »
It is strange how people have mental blocks when it comes to technology, often very specific types of technology.

There was one former boss who was excellent at dealing with a very fast-paced, demanding job that included overseeing about 50 employees in four locations, and keeping about 15 balls in the air at any given time. He oversaw some massive technology overhauls that had been long overdue.

But the man could not fax. He could not fax! He would come stand in the door of my office with a piece of paper in his hand and a pitiful look.
I can sort of understand that -- we have to put signs on the all-in-one printer/scanner/fax machines about how to dial out (9 first then the number) and face up or face down. Without the signs, I just don't fax often enough to remember and different machines have different set ups.

yup. Now that the work copy and fax machines are the same, i don't have a problem. But when the fax used to be a separate machine, I would struggle to remember face up or down, dial first then place paper, don't dial until after the paper in place, and all the different ways machines would work. I use the copy machine daily, multiple times, so I remember all the buttons and settings.
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marcel

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8245 on: Yesterday at 07:07:25 PM »
It is strange how people have mental blocks when it comes to technology, often very specific types of technology.

There was one former boss who was excellent at dealing with a very fast-paced, demanding job that included overseeing about 50 employees in four locations, and keeping about 15 balls in the air at any given time. He oversaw some massive technology overhauls that had been long overdue.

But the man could not fax. He could not fax! He would come stand in the door of my office with a piece of paper in his hand and a pitiful look.
I once had a boss who was running his own company very succesfully, putting up international shows all over Europe, getting artists everywhere etc.

The man had become famous as the first tabloid reporter in the country, and for 56 years, untill his retirement in 2002 he single handedly wrote an entire newspaper page every day 6 days a week, even when he was traveling. (and newspaper was broadsheet size)

he still wrote everything on a typewriter till the end   :o  (though I am not sure if he could fax it in himself or let someone else do that)
Wherever you go..... There you are.

Mel the Redcap

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8246 on: Yesterday at 07:48:54 PM »
I had a boss once - lovely guy - who was completely technologically incompetent. Not because he didn't want to learn! He really did want to be able to do things for himself, and he would get me to demonstrate how to do various things on the computer, or (the biggest problem) how to open the electronic combination lock on his office safe. He paid attention, he read instructions... and things would still not work for him. I don't even remember how many times I stood behind him and watched him carefully go through all the proper steps to do something, and get everything right, and it still would not work. Then I would do the exact same things he had just done, and the printer would map to the drive or the safe would open or the thingamabob would buckle the whatchamacallit's swash, and nobody ever managed to work out why.  :-\
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greencat

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #8247 on: Yesterday at 08:15:56 PM »
I've noticed that a lot of people, when confronted with an unfamiliar process, panic and make mistakes because they are panicking.  The process never becomes familiar because they're never ever able to complete it successfully because of the mistakes - and the hormones associated with stress reduce how effectively you learn - so it's a vicious circle.  A lot of times they're making very tiny mistakes - pressing buttons too slowly or too quickly causes problems with a surprising number of keypads.

When I need to teach someone something and they're messing up a lot after a demo/verbal/written instructions, I address the fact that the person is unfamiliar with the process and they're making mistakes, and go through it step by step.  The hand-holding seems to help a lot.

There are certainly people who are so high-strung they can't calm down enough to learn things, and some people who simply don't care to learn them.