Author Topic: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers  (Read 573027 times)

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Redwing

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1005 on: May 28, 2013, 02:19:13 PM »
Dear

We have finally succeeded in getting your package worthy of $2.5million out of delivery your consignment with the help of MR. John Mark Attorney General of Federal High Court of Justice Benin which act as your foreign Attorney representative here in Benin .We are waiting you to contact with all information (diplomat.morganjames@live.com) so that Diplomatic agent Mr.Morgan James will proceed to deliver your consignment box today to your home address.

Regards
Rev.Dogulas morrison
telephone..+229 9938 6874


I'm so excited!  What do you guess my package contains?

gramma dishes

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1006 on: May 28, 2013, 02:40:40 PM »

I was hesitant to take advantage of this business proposal until he introduced himself.  He MUST be legit.

Of course!  With a good strong ancient Chinese name like Norman, how could he not be?

Coralreef

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1007 on: May 28, 2013, 04:47:59 PM »
It would be interesting to know! My guess is tracking software that analyzes where the purchase originates in comparison to other recent purchases. If a purchase originates out of Louisiana on the same day you bought gas in Los Angeles that might send up a flag.

When I went overseas a few years ago to the Philippines, I contacted my credit card company and explained what I was doing. They asked the dates of departure and return and offered to temporarily lower my limit while there (in case I managed to get my card stolen while there). I was still nervous, though, that MC would 'forget' about this and not let a charge go through while I was there. Fortunately I never needed to use my card.

I always call my credit and debit card companies when I travel.  They know I'll be in X country, so anything that shows up from home or YZ country will be flagged for me to check.   

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Miss Misery

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1008 on: May 28, 2013, 04:57:28 PM »
I just got an e-mail from the First Lady herself telling me that there's $50 million dollars waiting for me, but I have to pay $950.00 in processing fees and give her my home address before I can collect.


Yeah, I'll get right on that.  ::)
« Last Edit: May 29, 2013, 11:29:04 AM by Miss Misery »

blueyzca01

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1009 on: May 28, 2013, 05:02:59 PM »
But there's FIFTY MILLION DOLLARS just sitting there waiting for you!  And if you act quickly enough, I'll bet that you can get some ginzu knives along with it.  Or at least a Sham-Wow.
No one ever says, "Why me?!?!" when something good happens.

cwm

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1010 on: May 28, 2013, 05:04:47 PM »
It would be interesting to know! My guess is tracking software that analyzes where the purchase originates in comparison to other recent purchases. If a purchase originates out of Louisiana on the same day you bought gas in Los Angeles that might send up a flag.

When I went overseas a few years ago to the Philippines, I contacted my credit card company and explained what I was doing. They asked the dates of departure and return and offered to temporarily lower my limit while there (in case I managed to get my card stolen while there). I was still nervous, though, that MC would 'forget' about this and not let a charge go through while I was there. Fortunately I never needed to use my card.

I always call my credit and debit card companies when I travel.  They know I'll be in X country, so anything that shows up from home or YZ country will be flagged for me to check.

Yes, but this doesn't always work. I called my bank to let them know I was going to be in Canada while I was up there. Despite this, the first charge that I tried was a PIN transaction, but it refused my card. I couldn't call my bank because I couldn't call international, and they couldn't call me because my cell phone wouldn't work. I ended up having to email my mom to get me some money by Western Union and paying her back. The bank wouldn't accept her word that I was in Canada, even though she was on the account and she was the POD benficiary because it wasn't her card that was being used, you see, it was mine.

Thipu1

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1011 on: May 28, 2013, 07:39:05 PM »
It would be interesting to know! My guess is tracking software that analyzes where the purchase originates in comparison to other recent purchases. If a purchase originates out of Louisiana on the same day you bought gas in Los Angeles that might send up a flag.

When I went overseas a few years ago to the Philippines, I contacted my credit card company and explained what I was doing. They asked the dates of departure and return and offered to temporarily lower my limit while there (in case I managed to get my card stolen while there). I was still nervous, though, that MC would 'forget' about this and not let a charge go through while I was there. Fortunately I never needed to use my card.

I always call my credit and debit card companies when I travel.  They know I'll be in X country, so anything that shows up from home or YZ country will be flagged for me to check.

A few years ago I got a call from a credit card company concerning a co-worker's account.  The company was concerned that she had numerous charges coming from Brooklyn, England and Sweden.

  No details about the charges were given but I explained that she was out of the USA.  She was
visiting relatives in Sweden and interviewing for a job in England. The hiring process was taking a long time and there were several cycles of these charges. 

The company accepted the story (which was absolutely true) but it did seem a bit odd that they would accept it from me.   


Softly Spoken

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1012 on: May 29, 2013, 12:12:18 AM »
Dear

We have finally succeeded in getting your package worthy of $2.5million out of delivery your consignment with the help of MR. John Mark Attorney General of Federal High Court of Justice Benin which act as your foreign Attorney representative here in Benin .We are waiting you to contact with all information (diplomat.morganjames@live.com) so that Diplomatic agent Mr.Morgan James will proceed to deliver your consignment box today to your home address.

Regards
Rev.Dogulas morrison
telephone..+229 9938 6874


I'm so excited!  What do you guess my package contains?

I will admit I never even heard of Benin (a republic in Africa apparently). Now, I have never traveled outside the U.S. If I got a letter from somewhere in Africa, from someone I have never heard of, telling me they wanted to give me millions of dollars for no reason... ??? ::)...
WHO BELIEVES THIS? EVER?? Seriously! I mean sure it's nice to dream about but IT. DOES. NOT. HAPPEN. Random strangers do not want to give other random strangers millions of dollars for no reason with no strings attached.
I know times are tough and it sucks to not have money, but who is desperate enough to fall for this? I can't get my brain around it.

If anyone wants you to give them money before they will give you money, then you are just going to lose your money. Period. Anything legit does not involve fees. And doesn't come from strangers in a country you've never been to. ::)
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WolfWay

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1013 on: May 29, 2013, 12:58:21 AM »
Some friends of mine are being entertained by some thieves/scammers. They had a break in about a year ago at their home - among other things taken was their PS3. They had saved their netflix information on it, and didn't reset the password or anything (honestly, they said they just forgot they'd saved it). The police have yet to recover any of the goods, and it's suspected that they were given/sold to friends of the burglars.

They noticed that their 'suggested' queue was full of bizarre stuff suddenly. Turns out, the current users of their PS3 are USING THEIR (my friends) NETFLIX ACCOUNT. My friends are big fans of indie films and Gordon Ramsey - they're getting recommendations for mostly African American oriented, gangs and s3x and violence, really awful stuff. Things that make Tyler Perry look like Shakespeare. My friends are, incidentally, African American themselves, but the movies these people are watching are such stereotypically trashy things that no one in their house had even heard of most of it, and only when they started looking for the titles 'recently watched' on IMDB did they realize what was being watched.

The police department is very interested in this - and thanks to netflix's customer service folks and a handy subpoena, the gravy train is about to end for some folks. My friends just want their PS3 back - they have saved games they want to play some more!
Funnily enough, there's currently a news story in South Africa about a cell phone thief (and mugger/kidnapper/hijacker) who took a photo of himself and uploaded it to the former cell phone owner's WhatsApp profile. And his photo is now being splashed ALL OVER the internet and newspapers here and the police are very interested in having a little chat with him.

http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Is-this-SAs-dumbest-thief-20130528

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Cereal Killer

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1014 on: May 29, 2013, 08:13:19 AM »
Some friends of mine are being entertained by some thieves/scammers. They had a break in about a year ago at their home - among other things taken was their PS3. They had saved their netflix information on it, and didn't reset the password or anything (honestly, they said they just forgot they'd saved it). The police have yet to recover any of the goods, and it's suspected that they were given/sold to friends of the burglars.

They noticed that their 'suggested' queue was full of bizarre stuff suddenly. Turns out, the current users of their PS3 are USING THEIR (my friends) NETFLIX ACCOUNT. My friends are big fans of indie films and Gordon Ramsey - they're getting recommendations for mostly African American oriented, gangs and s3x and violence, really awful stuff. Things that make Tyler Perry look like Shakespeare. My friends are, incidentally, African American themselves, but the movies these people are watching are such stereotypically trashy things that no one in their house had even heard of most of it, and only when they started looking for the titles 'recently watched' on IMDB did they realize what was being watched.

The police department is very interested in this - and thanks to netflix's customer service folks and a handy subpoena, the gravy train is about to end for some folks. My friends just want their PS3 back - they have saved games they want to play some more!
Funnily enough, there's currently a news story in South Africa about a cell phone thief (and mugger/kidnapper/hijacker) who took a photo of himself and uploaded it to the former cell phone owner's WhatsApp profile. And his photo is now being splashed ALL OVER the internet and newspapers here and the police are very interested in having a little chat with him.

http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Is-this-SAs-dumbest-thief-20130528
Ha, the same thing happened to my cousin last year.

Her phone was stolen from her bag, and the next day she found new photos on her Dropbox. Of course she shared those with everyone on Facebook. Then the thief recorded a video of himself dancing in front of a mirror, vey silly moves and all, and it spread all over as well. It must have reached some of the thieves friends eventually, because a couple of days later my cousin received a call from the police station that someone had returned her phone there.

o_gal

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1015 on: May 29, 2013, 08:16:30 AM »
It would be interesting to know! My guess is tracking software that analyzes where the purchase originates in comparison to other recent purchases. If a purchase originates out of Louisiana on the same day you bought gas in Los Angeles that might send up a flag.

When I went overseas a few years ago to the Philippines, I contacted my credit card company and explained what I was doing. They asked the dates of departure and return and offered to temporarily lower my limit while there (in case I managed to get my card stolen while there). I was still nervous, though, that MC would 'forget' about this and not let a charge go through while I was there. Fortunately I never needed to use my card.

I always call my credit and debit card companies when I travel.  They know I'll be in X country, so anything that shows up from home or YZ country will be flagged for me to check.

Yes, but this doesn't always work. I called my bank to let them know I was going to be in Canada while I was up there. Despite this, the first charge that I tried was a PIN transaction, but it refused my card. I couldn't call my bank because I couldn't call international, and they couldn't call me because my cell phone wouldn't work. I ended up having to email my mom to get me some money by Western Union and paying her back. The bank wouldn't accept her word that I was in Canada, even though she was on the account and she was the POD benficiary because it wasn't her card that was being used, you see, it was mine.

Yep, doesn't always work for credit cards either. I posted this in the old brain-hurt thread, but I called my credit card companies and told them I'd be using the cards in France between X and Y dates. When we returned back to Paris, and I used it to pay for the same hotel we stayed at the first time, they flagged it. And they cancelled it after they tried to contact me to see if it was a legit charge. But the only number they had for me was my US home phone. So after being told and having it on record that I would be in France on those dates, they called me at home in the US, to verify that yes, I am using the card in France, which I already told them I would be doing but can't tell them in the phone conversation on a US phone because, you know, I'm in France ::)

Coralreef

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1016 on: May 29, 2013, 08:52:11 AM »
It would be interesting to know! My guess is tracking software that analyzes where the purchase originates in comparison to other recent purchases. If a purchase originates out of Louisiana on the same day you bought gas in Los Angeles that might send up a flag.

When I went overseas a few years ago to the Philippines, I contacted my credit card company and explained what I was doing. They asked the dates of departure and return and offered to temporarily lower my limit while there (in case I managed to get my card stolen while there). I was still nervous, though, that MC would 'forget' about this and not let a charge go through while I was there. Fortunately I never needed to use my card.

I always call my credit and debit card companies when I travel.  They know I'll be in X country, so anything that shows up from home or YZ country will be flagged for me to check.

Yes, but this doesn't always work. I called my bank to let them know I was going to be in Canada while I was up there. Despite this, the first charge that I tried was a PIN transaction, but it refused my card. I couldn't call my bank because I couldn't call international, and they couldn't call me because my cell phone wouldn't work. I ended up having to email my mom to get me some money by Western Union and paying her back. The bank wouldn't accept her word that I was in Canada, even though she was on the account and she was the POD benficiary because it wasn't her card that was being used, you see, it was mine.

Yep, doesn't always work for credit cards either. I posted this in the old brain-hurt thread, but I called my credit card companies and told them I'd be using the cards in France between X and Y dates. When we returned back to Paris, and I used it to pay for the same hotel we stayed at the first time, they flagged it. And they cancelled it after they tried to contact me to see if it was a legit charge. But the only number they had for me was my US home phone. So after being told and having it on record that I would be in France on those dates, they called me at home in the US, to verify that yes, I am using the card in France, which I already told them I would be doing but can't tell them in the phone conversation on a US phone because, you know, I'm in France ::)

Strange, never had those problems when I travel.  My cards go through like a charm. 

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nutraxfornerves

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Luci

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1018 on: May 29, 2013, 10:42:10 AM »
Now we are receiving notices from our internet provider that one of our computers has a bot, with all kinds of scary information about bots and an offer to search out a repair, for a fee, of course. How kind of them.

We have two anti-virus programs running and they both say everything is fine, and we have no problems we've seen, including on our credit card bills.

ladyknight1

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1019 on: May 29, 2013, 10:47:09 AM »
My university is currently under a DNS attack, and our internet speed is slow, almost as bad as dial-up. Makes it very hard for me to get my work done, as everything is internet based.