Author Topic: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers  (Read 690216 times)

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Softly Spoken

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1050 on: June 01, 2013, 12:57:14 PM »
File under "truth in 'advertising'" - The other day, someone called and the Caller ID listed the name above the (unfamiliar) number as "SCAM."

I obviously didn't answer but part of me was tempted to pick up: "Hi Scam! How are you doing, Scam?"  >:D

.......

I have to confess to this unintentionally effective handling of a telemarketer: my father used to live here but has married and moved out. Lucky me, I still get all his junk mail and calls from charities asking for money (he was a horrible push-over). One day when the umpteenth person failed to identify themselves and instead asked for "Mr. *Mispronounced Name*", I heaved a big sigh and said tiredly "He's not...here anymore." She said "Oh, I'm sorry! I'll take his name off the list." Apparently my tone and choice of wording made her think I was saying he had died! :o... >:D

Now when they call for him I say "He's no longer with us." Technically true!  :P ::)
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CrazyDaffodilLady

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1051 on: June 01, 2013, 01:00:25 PM »
Did any other UK E-Hellers hear Radio 4's You and Yours on Thursday? They were interviewing someone who fell for the Windows scam. She sounded a nice, sensible woman, but as she said, she wasn't IT literate, so when she saw the error messages they told her about she believed there really was a problem. She paid something like 230 for a lifetime cure and they would ring back every so often to check how things were going, find another problem, and charge for sorting that. I think she then complained about this, at which point the "FBI Fraud squad" got in touch. They could catch the scammers by making a payment of 500 and tracing it. This happened a few times. She said everyone was very friendly and helpful. I missed the end as I was driving to a meeting, but she believed she had lost about 64,000. It just seems to have been so easy, small amounts, nothing too much to raise her suspicions. It was quite scary how she had been sucked in.
:o  :o  :o  :o  :o
According to a pound-to-dollar converter, that's U.S. $97,164.80.  I usually start to get suspicious after the first $50,000 (32,933) required to fix an error message  ;D
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Jones

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1052 on: June 01, 2013, 01:16:08 PM »
Did any other UK E-Hellers hear Radio 4's You and Yours on Thursday? They were interviewing someone who fell for the Windows scam. She sounded a nice, sensible woman, but as she said, she wasn't IT literate, so when she saw the error messages they told her about she believed there really was a problem. She paid something like 230 for a lifetime cure and they would ring back every so often to check how things were going, find another problem, and charge for sorting that. I think she then complained about this, at which point the "FBI Fraud squad" got in touch. They could catch the scammers by making a payment of 500 and tracing it. This happened a few times. She said everyone was very friendly and helpful. I missed the end as I was driving to a meeting, but she believed she had lost about 64,000. It just seems to have been so easy, small amounts, nothing too much to raise her suspicions. It was quite scary how she had been sucked in.
:o  :o  :o  :o  :o
According to a pound-to-dollar converter, that's U.S. $97,164.80.  I usually start to get suspicious after the first $50,000 (32,933) required to fix an error message  ;D.
There has to be a point where a logical person just buys a new desktop...

deadbody

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1053 on: June 01, 2013, 04:48:53 PM »
Did any other UK E-Hellers hear Radio 4's You and Yours on Thursday? They were interviewing someone who fell for the Windows scam. She sounded a nice, sensible woman, but as she said, she wasn't IT literate, so when she saw the error messages they told her about she believed there really was a problem. She paid something like 230 for a lifetime cure and they would ring back every so often to check how things were going, find another problem, and charge for sorting that. I think she then complained about this, at which point the "FBI Fraud squad" got in touch. They could catch the scammers by making a payment of 500 and tracing it. This happened a few times. She said everyone was very friendly and helpful. I missed the end as I was driving to a meeting, but she believed she had lost about 64,000. It just seems to have been so easy, small amounts, nothing too much to raise her suspicions. It was quite scary how she had been sucked in.
:o  :o  :o  :o  :o
According to a pound-to-dollar converter, that's U.S. $97,164.80.  I usually start to get suspicious after the first $50,000 (32,933) required to fix an error message  ;D.
There has to be a point where a logical person just buys a new desktop...

But how do you get it into the house without getting the new desktop sick.  Those viruses hang around forever, and you can't lysol the new computer. 

ladyknight1

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1054 on: June 01, 2013, 04:52:14 PM »
That story makes me so sad for the victim, and mad at the perpetrators of the scam.  >:(

Tia2

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1055 on: June 02, 2013, 12:04:53 PM »
My aunt has learning difficulties.  A number of people have suggested we get her a cheap computer and use Skype and email to stay in touch.  It sounds like a great idea, but I have no doubt she'd fall for any computer based scam going - it just isn't worth the risk.

gramma dishes

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1056 on: June 02, 2013, 12:45:33 PM »
I have heard that there are special computers out there for use by both children and the elderly that have some sort of system that blocks virtually all advertising and other things that those two groups should not have to deal with (like "pron"). 

Not sure if it's the OS itself, or if it's the service provider that makes them supposedly safe.  But it might be worth looking into, especially if your Aunt doesn't have access to a credit card or anything like that the bad guys could tap into should they be able to somehow circumvent the protections.

Tia2

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1057 on: June 02, 2013, 02:39:21 PM »
I have heard that there are special computers out there for use by both children and the elderly that have some sort of system that blocks virtually all advertising and other things that those two groups should not have to deal with (like "pron"). 

Not sure if it's the OS itself, or if it's the service provider that makes them supposedly safe.  But it might be worth looking into, especially if your Aunt doesn't have access to a credit card or anything like that the bad guys could tap into should they be able to somehow circumvent the protections.

The problem is that this is unlikely to deal with all spam and if she got a message saying one of her family needed money sent urgently because their credit cards had been stolen, I've no doubt she'd believe it totally.  She lives independently (there is a warden on site but he/she doesn't interfere unless called) so there would be no one looking over her shoulder.  My mother has already had to get rid of various leech 'boyfriends' like the one who told her that after 6 months living with her he automatically owned half her house (he didn't make any contribution to the upkeep) and another who wanted her to buy a car for him to drive her about in, but it would have to be registered in his name because she didn't have a driving licence.  Luckily, the house and most of her money is in a trust so my mother would have had to sign off on this which is how she figured out what was going on.

gramma dishes

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1058 on: June 02, 2013, 07:11:39 PM »
^^^  I see.

Yes, I agree that in that case I think having a computer for her would just be asking for trouble.  But it's kind of sad, isn't it?

RebeccainGA

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1059 on: June 03, 2013, 09:43:34 AM »
^^^  I see.

Yes, I agree that in that case I think having a computer for her would just be asking for trouble.  But it's kind of sad, isn't it?
Might I suggest an iPad, with FaceTime? Or even an iPod Touch? They have FaceTime as well, and are difficult (well, more difficult) to get into too much trouble with - and you can just tell her that unless it's an Apple person calling, it's not for her. Just a thought.

ladyknight1

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1060 on: June 03, 2013, 10:29:49 AM »
I came in to work this morning, checked my business email and I had a verification email from Apple for a stranger. I called them and reported it. I hope it is just a typo on the account, and not an attempt at scamming.

We have three friends who have had their facebook accounts cloned. Be on the look out if you have one.

Luci

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1061 on: June 03, 2013, 10:45:19 AM »

We have three friends who have had their facebook accounts cloned. Be on the look out if you have one.

I have tried searching for what 'cloning' means in this case but cannot understand what they are trying to say.

Could you please explain it to me, simply - or at least what it means to me personally?

ladyknight1

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1062 on: June 03, 2013, 10:47:05 AM »
It means someone creates a new account with your name, and then try to pass themselves off as you. Article about it at the link: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2068951/Facebook-clone-accounts-fool-ANYONE-accepting-fake-friend.html

Luci

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1063 on: June 03, 2013, 10:58:42 AM »
It means someone creates a new account with your name, and then try to pass themselves off as you. Article about it at the link: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2068951/Facebook-clone-accounts-fool-ANYONE-accepting-fake-friend.html

Thanks. I still  don't understand completely, but I know enough to continue not accepting 'Friends of friends'. I never have, because I don't know them and really don't care about them beyond how they affect my 'Friends' and their just being human.

ladyknight1

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1064 on: June 03, 2013, 11:26:33 AM »
My friend, Bob Smith, was cloned on Friday. Now there is a Robert Smith, with Bob's pictures, asking to be my friend. However, I will not friend people that I know I am already friends with, and I use the notify option when it is evident that it is not actually Bob.