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Author Topic: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers  (Read 2580224 times)

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Hillia

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1365 on: July 18, 2013, 03:19:25 PM »
Operator
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Please give me Jesus on the line. . .

(Fantastic song and well worth looking up if you don't know it!)

Yes, but is he your own personal Jesus?

(Sorry, I couldn't resist...another good song.)

I don't care if it rains or freezes...

Ain't nobody can eat fifty eggs.

Man, now I have to go watch the movie again.

mrs_deb

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1366 on: July 18, 2013, 03:39:03 PM »


FYI, they answer the phone with "Moshi-moshi" in Japan!

I like "moshi-moshi!"  What does it mean, literally?

I'm afraid I don't know if there's a literal translation other than just being used for "hello".  Perhaps some of our Japanese or Japan-based members would know better than I? 

NyaChan

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1367 on: July 18, 2013, 04:00:16 PM »
This site has some fun explanations for it:  http://www.tofugu.com/2009/02/26/what-does-moshi-moshi-mean/

amandaelizabeth

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1368 on: July 18, 2013, 05:50:49 PM »
"Sabu wa wanaxim" is what they say in Somalia. 

scotcat60

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1369 on: July 19, 2013, 03:55:10 AM »
I like "moshi-moshi!"  What does it mean, literally?

I'm afraid I don't know if there's a literal translation other than just being used for "hello".  Perhaps some of our Japanese or Japan-based members would know better than I? 

When my SIL worked for the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank staff answered callers with "Moshi Moshi. Hai Hai?" which they were told meant "Hello Hello. Yes Yes?"
As for God's PR, he has a whole staff of angels and archangels surely?
« Last Edit: July 20, 2013, 08:34:27 AM by scotcat60 »

southern girl

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1370 on: July 19, 2013, 06:58:07 AM »
In Bulgaria, some people answer the phone, "Da, molya" which, literallly translated, means "Yes, please."

Ms_Cellany

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1371 on: July 19, 2013, 08:49:12 AM »
This site has some fun explanations for it:  http://www.tofugu.com/2009/02/26/what-does-moshi-moshi-mean/

I read that & some other linked pages - my takeaway is that "moshi" means "speak to me," and you say it twice to prove you're not a ghost (becaust ghosts can only say "moshi" once).
Bingle bongle dingle dangle yickity-do yickity-dah ping-pong lippy-toppy too tah.

DaisyG

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1372 on: July 19, 2013, 10:32:26 AM »
Somebody at work just told me that this has worked for one of his neighbours:

Answer the phone in a language other than English.  For us here in Canada, 'Ola' would work, 'Bonjour', maybe not.  I'm thinking about answering in Japanese.  Phonetically here because I have no idea how to spell it:  Koneitchiwa.  Better warn my Dad before I do it, though, or he'll be really confused!  (I don't have call display.)

Extra tip: The way to answer the phone in Spanish is "Bueno!"

In Spain I was taught to answer the phone with "dígame" ("tell me")

Also, on QI (so it's probably true), they said that before the invention of the phone, people would use 'hullo' as an expression of surprise, but afterwards it turned into 'hello' as a way of answering the phone, then into a greeting you could use face-to-face.

Thipu1

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1373 on: July 19, 2013, 10:40:32 AM »
As I understand it, Alexander Graham Bell preferred the term 'Ahoy' as a proper salutation on the telephone. 

cwm

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1374 on: July 19, 2013, 11:46:28 AM »
I have access to a shared inbox at my company. We get a daily digest report of near-certain junk mail from another company. Why we get it, I have no idea. It doesn't matter.

Today, we have two emails from "Dr. Travis Stork" with the subject "Eat to Lose Weight!"

The best part? They came from two separate email addresses. One was mtguq (at) aljaeza (dot) org (dot) sa  and the other was from mtgts (at) arbysbeef (dot) com.

Belle

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1375 on: July 19, 2013, 12:00:16 PM »
As I understand it, Alexander Graham Bell preferred the term 'Ahoy' as a proper salutation on the telephone.
My husband answers the phone, "Ahoy, ahoy." I've never known why - maybe he's trying to go back to the good old days!

RingTailedLemur

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1376 on: July 19, 2013, 12:03:50 PM »
As I understand it, Alexander Graham Bell preferred the term 'Ahoy' as a proper salutation on the telephone.
My husband answers the phone, "Ahoy, ahoy." I've never known why - maybe he's trying to go back to the good old days!

That's how Mr Burns answers the phone in The Simpsons.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1377 on: July 19, 2013, 02:54:38 PM »
Boy do I have a story for this thread!

I left work an hour early because a big storm was about to hit and I wasn't going to get anything done, worrying, so I came home to put my car safe in the garage and move water around in my rainbarrels.

As I got out of my car, two young men were coming up my driveway with clipboards in their hand.  I told them that whatever it was, I wasn't interested.  The spokesman continued, 'We just want to come in and check the age of your furnace.'  To which I replied, 'I'm well aware of the age of my furnace, I'm on top of it, I'm not interested.  Good bye.'  And went around the side of the house to the back yard to check on my garden, in this wind.  It was just starting to rain.

I come back a couple minutes later and these guys are still standing there.  The one guy wants to come into my garage to make a phone call.  I told him no and to go away.  He persisted.  So I got mad.  'I said NO.  GO AWAY.'  He said something about thinking people would be nicer to young people.  As the garage door was closing, I said, 'I would be if you weren't trying to scam me.'

And I called the police when I got inside on the non-emergency number.  The officer I spoke to was well aware of what their spiel was and just wanted the details about why I was calling.  And told me I did exactly the right thing.

I'm still a little shaky.  Although that might have a little to do with the storm and the fact that I was just outside, making sure all my rainbarrels were full.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

Twik

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1378 on: July 19, 2013, 02:59:10 PM »
As I understand it, Alexander Graham Bell preferred the term 'Ahoy' as a proper salutation on the telephone.

Hello and ahoy are related, according to Wikipedia:

Quote
According to the Oxford English Dictionary, hello is an alteration of hallo, hollo,[5] which came from Old High German "halâ, holâ, emphatic imperative of halôn, holôn to fetch, used especially in hailing a ferryman."[6]

"Ferryman! Hello! I mean, Ahoy! I mean, Hail! I mean, the he... with it, I'll swim."
"The sky's the limit. Your sky. Your limit. Now, let's dance!"

doodlemor

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1379 on: July 19, 2013, 03:22:10 PM »

As I got out of my car, two young men were coming up my driveway with clipboards in their hand.  I told them that whatever it was, I wasn't interested.  The spokesman continued, 'We just want to come in and check the age of your furnace.'  To which I replied, 'I'm well aware of the age of my furnace, I'm on top of it, I'm not interested. 

I read a story when I was a teenager about the furnace flim flammers, that I think may have been retold in one of the Puzo books.  It's possible that this is an urban legend, but its use does predate the Puzo books.

Supposedly, the FFF went to the home of a member of an organized crime family, and said that they were there to inspect the furnace.  The men in the house let them go down into the basement, where they proceeded to dismantle the furnace and put the pieces all over the basement floor.  The FFF then quoted the home owner an exorbitant price to put the furnace back together in such a way that it would pass their "inspection."

You know where this is going.....  The FFF were treated in such a way by the homeowner and his cohorts that they knew better than to try their scam in that neighborhood again.

Your post is very scary, Outdoor Girl.  I'm glad that you are OK.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2013, 03:25:13 PM by doodlemor »