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Author Topic: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers  (Read 2020240 times)

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ladyknight1

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  • Not all those who wander are lost
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1470 on: August 12, 2013, 03:24:06 PM »
There is a family I know who has a very talented daughter. The daughter is a dancer, and has won top national awards for dancing. She was given a full tuition scholarship to a school far away. However, the parents can't afford the room and board. The mother contacted me a few months ago (I work at a university), and I gave her lots of resources to see what they might be able to do in order to make this a reality.

Did they go to the website on funding education? No

Did they contact the bank they have a good history with about getting a government subsidized parents loan? No

Did they tell their daughter that she would be better off attending a local school and working? No

They created a funding website for their daughter's room and board, and are begging every day for donations on their face book pages. They haven't succeeded in raising the money and it is too late for their daughter to attend a local school. Classes at new school start in just over a week.
“All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

Miss March

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1471 on: August 12, 2013, 05:25:32 PM »
We are on guard at the hotel for this latest scam.

The scammers (usually a couple) will be dressed nicely and will act like they are guests of the hotel. They will cruise around the hotel floors until they locate a housekeeper cleaning an occupied suite. Then they will walk right into the room, and say something like "Oh, hello. Don't mind me. You can keep working. I just needed to swing in and grab my laptop," or "If you would please excuse me, I need a few minutes of privacy here, please." They speak with such authority and seem so confident that it can trick the maid into assuming that this is the guest who is staying in the room, and they immediately comply with whatever they are asked. The end result is that a thief can brazenly walk out with a bag, electronics, and personal items, all within a matter of minutes, and the maid won't raise any alarm. The theft isn't discovered until later, when the real guests get back to their room.

We've alerted everyone on staff about this ruse. Housekeeping is now trained that if a guest returns to the room while the maid is servicing it, she needs to ask the guest to present their valid key card to the door before she can allow them into the room. Most of our guests really appreciate being asked to to verify themselves, actually. They are glad to know that the maid won't let just anyone come into their room while they are away.


I assume you heard the way she spoke to me at dinner.
Of course, but how does it help to answer rudeness with rudeness?             --Downton Abbey

Carotte

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1472 on: August 12, 2013, 06:10:30 PM »
We are on guard at the hotel for this latest scam.

The scammers (usually a couple) will be dressed nicely and will act like they are guests of the hotel. They will cruise around the hotel floors until they locate a housekeeper cleaning an occupied suite. Then they will walk right into the room, and say something like "Oh, hello. Don't mind me. You can keep working. I just needed to swing in and grab my laptop," or "If you would please excuse me, I need a few minutes of privacy here, please." They speak with such authority and seem so confident that it can trick the maid into assuming that this is the guest who is staying in the room, and they immediately comply with whatever they are asked. The end result is that a thief can brazenly walk out with a bag, electronics, and personal items, all within a matter of minutes, and the maid won't raise any alarm. The theft isn't discovered until later, when the real guests get back to their room.

We've alerted everyone on staff about this ruse. Housekeeping is now trained that if a guest returns to the room while the maid is servicing it, she needs to ask the guest to present their valid key card to the door before she can allow them into the room. Most of our guests really appreciate being asked to to verify themselves, actually. They are glad to know that the maid won't let just anyone come into their room while they are away.

One thing I don't understand about hotels are the 'leave your keys at the reception' ones, that are still very widely prevalent. I'd venture that chain hotels mostly have the credit card size cards that you get to always keep, but I've been in a lot off hotels, above middle range ones, that still have actual keys that you have to leave at the reception. And then ask for them with just the room number (not even "Mr John, room 309".
How is that not a recipe for theft and failure?
In hotels with more than a hundred rooms and rotating staff, no way the clerk at 10am will be the same at 6pm or even remember you, so how come it's still done?
Even the keycards one, for example, this morning I was graced with the gift of waking up with the fire alarm and bolting out of my room with the bare essentials (shirt,pants that I put in the corridor because they where inside out and slippers.) no keycard, that my parents had to ask the clerk for while I was sitting down elsewhere (he made another keycard on the spot), for all hedoesn't  know they made up a number and just wanted to prowl my room...

kherbert05

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1473 on: August 12, 2013, 07:32:19 PM »
We are on guard at the hotel for this latest scam.

The scammers (usually a couple) will be dressed nicely and will act like they are guests of the hotel. They will cruise around the hotel floors until they locate a housekeeper cleaning an occupied suite. Then they will walk right into the room, and say something like "Oh, hello. Don't mind me. You can keep working. I just needed to swing in and grab my laptop," or "If you would please excuse me, I need a few minutes of privacy here, please." They speak with such authority and seem so confident that it can trick the maid into assuming that this is the guest who is staying in the room, and they immediately comply with whatever they are asked. The end result is that a thief can brazenly walk out with a bag, electronics, and personal items, all within a matter of minutes, and the maid won't raise any alarm. The theft isn't discovered until later, when the real guests get back to their room.

We've alerted everyone on staff about this ruse. Housekeeping is now trained that if a guest returns to the room while the maid is servicing it, she needs to ask the guest to present their valid key card to the door before she can allow them into the room. Most of our guests really appreciate being asked to to verify themselves, actually. They are glad to know that the maid won't let just anyone come into their room while they are away.

One thing I don't understand about hotels are the 'leave your keys at the reception' ones, that are still very widely prevalent. I'd venture that chain hotels mostly have the credit card size cards that you get to always keep, but I've been in a lot off hotels, above middle range ones, that still have actual keys that you have to leave at the reception. And then ask for them with just the room number (not even "Mr John, room 309".
How is that not a recipe for theft and failure?
In hotels with more than a hundred rooms and rotating staff, no way the clerk at 10am will be the same at 6pm or even remember you, so how come it's still done?
Even the keycards one, for example, this morning I was graced with the gift of waking up with the fire alarm and bolting out of my room with the bare essentials (shirt,pants that I put in the corridor because they where inside out and slippers.) no keycard, that my parents had to ask the clerk for while I was sitting down elsewhere (he made another keycard on the spot), for all hedoesn't  know they made up a number and just wanted to prowl my room...
Where are you that they ask you to leave your key at reception? I've traveled quiet a bit in the US and Canada and have never seen that.

When I was in Greece then later Scotland/England we turned our keys in - but that was because the school didn't want 1) kids losing keys 2) kids ditching their chaperons, bringing a "new friend" back to the hotel and going up to the room for some scrabble time. (Hey never said my classmates were particularly clever - they put the invites to keg parties on the windshields of the cars at school and couldn't figure out why they kept getting busted.) I was under the impression that the hotel held the envelopes of keys as a favor to the school not as a normal thing.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

PastryGoddess

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1474 on: August 12, 2013, 08:11:12 PM »
We are on guard at the hotel for this latest scam.

The scammers (usually a couple) will be dressed nicely and will act like they are guests of the hotel. They will cruise around the hotel floors until they locate a housekeeper cleaning an occupied suite. Then they will walk right into the room, and say something like "Oh, hello. Don't mind me. You can keep working. I just needed to swing in and grab my laptop," or "If you would please excuse me, I need a few minutes of privacy here, please." They speak with such authority and seem so confident that it can trick the maid into assuming that this is the guest who is staying in the room, and they immediately comply with whatever they are asked. The end result is that a thief can brazenly walk out with a bag, electronics, and personal items, all within a matter of minutes, and the maid won't raise any alarm. The theft isn't discovered until later, when the real guests get back to their room.

We've alerted everyone on staff about this ruse. Housekeeping is now trained that if a guest returns to the room while the maid is servicing it, she needs to ask the guest to present their valid key card to the door before she can allow them into the room. Most of our guests really appreciate being asked to to verify themselves, actually. They are glad to know that the maid won't let just anyone come into their room while they are away.

One thing I don't understand about hotels are the 'leave your keys at the reception' ones, that are still very widely prevalent. I'd venture that chain hotels mostly have the credit card size cards that you get to always keep, but I've been in a lot off hotels, above middle range ones, that still have actual keys that you have to leave at the reception. And then ask for them with just the room number (not even "Mr John, room 309".
How is that not a recipe for theft and failure?
In hotels with more than a hundred rooms and rotating staff, no way the clerk at 10am will be the same at 6pm or even remember you, so how come it's still done?
Even the keycards one, for example, this morning I was graced with the gift of waking up with the fire alarm and bolting out of my room with the bare essentials (shirt,pants that I put in the corridor because they where inside out and slippers.) no keycard, that my parents had to ask the clerk for while I was sitting down elsewhere (he made another keycard on the spot), for all hedoesn't  know they made up a number and just wanted to prowl my room...

Where is this?  The last place I went that had actual keys was in Shenandoah at Skyland Resort.  Every other place I've stayed uses key cards.  And I travel A LOT

MariaE

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1475 on: August 13, 2013, 12:01:59 AM »
We are on guard at the hotel for this latest scam.

The scammers (usually a couple) will be dressed nicely and will act like they are guests of the hotel. They will cruise around the hotel floors until they locate a housekeeper cleaning an occupied suite. Then they will walk right into the room, and say something like "Oh, hello. Don't mind me. You can keep working. I just needed to swing in and grab my laptop," or "If you would please excuse me, I need a few minutes of privacy here, please." They speak with such authority and seem so confident that it can trick the maid into assuming that this is the guest who is staying in the room, and they immediately comply with whatever they are asked. The end result is that a thief can brazenly walk out with a bag, electronics, and personal items, all within a matter of minutes, and the maid won't raise any alarm. The theft isn't discovered until later, when the real guests get back to their room.

We've alerted everyone on staff about this ruse. Housekeeping is now trained that if a guest returns to the room while the maid is servicing it, she needs to ask the guest to present their valid key card to the door before she can allow them into the room. Most of our guests really appreciate being asked to to verify themselves, actually. They are glad to know that the maid won't let just anyone come into their room while they are away.

One thing I don't understand about hotels are the 'leave your keys at the reception' ones, that are still very widely prevalent. I'd venture that chain hotels mostly have the credit card size cards that you get to always keep, but I've been in a lot off hotels, above middle range ones, that still have actual keys that you have to leave at the reception. And then ask for them with just the room number (not even "Mr John, room 309".
How is that not a recipe for theft and failure?
In hotels with more than a hundred rooms and rotating staff, no way the clerk at 10am will be the same at 6pm or even remember you, so how come it's still done?
Even the keycards one, for example, this morning I was graced with the gift of waking up with the fire alarm and bolting out of my room with the bare essentials (shirt,pants that I put in the corridor because they where inside out and slippers.) no keycard, that my parents had to ask the clerk for while I was sitting down elsewhere (he made another keycard on the spot), for all hedoesn't  know they made up a number and just wanted to prowl my room...

Where is this?  The last place I went that had actual keys was in Shenandoah at Skyland Resort.  Every other place I've stayed uses key cards.  And I travel A LOT

It's been several years since I saw this last, but it used to be the norm - at least in Europe. I still see it in some B&B type places, mostly in Southern Europe.
 
Dane by birth, Kiwi by choice

Carotte

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1476 on: August 13, 2013, 02:37:18 AM »
As some people thought, mostly Europe (France, Portugal, UK at least from recent  personal experience) and even Japan not two years ago (in Kyoto).

Cherry91

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1477 on: August 13, 2013, 09:09:01 AM »
I encountered a scam artist the other week, just remembered him now.

I was walking back to my office when a man in the street stopped me. He claimed to be working on behalf of a local beauty salon, but had no uniform or identification on (the rule where I live is that if you're selling or advertising anything, you either have to be wearing either a branded uniform or some form of identification proving you work for the company you say you do).

He starts a spiel while showing me a leaflet about how the salon were currently doing a wonderful special offer, where if you gave him £20 now, you could get over £300 of treatments! But you had to pay by either giving him your card details or writing him a cheque.

I would never give my details to someone on the street, and told him I didn't intend to give him any money. Upon being told this, he whipped the leaflet out of my hand and went to harass another girl on the street. Why, it's almost like you don't want someone to be able to Google your salon... and find out it doesn't exist (I live in the area he claimed the salon was located. It doesn't)!

I had my officer manager send around an email warning that there was a con artist operating on the street, so at least he didn't claim any victims from there.
All will be well, and all manner of things will be well.

doodlemor

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1478 on: August 13, 2013, 01:22:18 PM »
I once had a salesman feign great astonishment and leave my porch in a huff, because I wouldn't accept a free pyrex pie plate and listen to his spiel. 

CakeBeret

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1479 on: August 13, 2013, 01:48:58 PM »
We are on guard at the hotel for this latest scam.

The scammers (usually a couple) will be dressed nicely and will act like they are guests of the hotel. They will cruise around the hotel floors until they locate a housekeeper cleaning an occupied suite. Then they will walk right into the room, and say something like "Oh, hello. Don't mind me. You can keep working. I just needed to swing in and grab my laptop," or "If you would please excuse me, I need a few minutes of privacy here, please." They speak with such authority and seem so confident that it can trick the maid into assuming that this is the guest who is staying in the room, and they immediately comply with whatever they are asked. The end result is that a thief can brazenly walk out with a bag, electronics, and personal items, all within a matter of minutes, and the maid won't raise any alarm. The theft isn't discovered until later, when the real guests get back to their room.

We've alerted everyone on staff about this ruse. Housekeeping is now trained that if a guest returns to the room while the maid is servicing it, she needs to ask the guest to present their valid key card to the door before she can allow them into the room. Most of our guests really appreciate being asked to to verify themselves, actually. They are glad to know that the maid won't let just anyone come into their room while they are away.

I'm morbidly impressed with how brazen that is.
"From a procrastination standpoint, today has been wildly successful."

Slartibartfast

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1480 on: August 13, 2013, 02:41:56 PM »
This could also go into the "things that make your brain hurt" folder, but search isn't working so it's going here  :)  I could edit out the bank in question, but I'm not feeling particularly charitable to them right now so it's staying in.

I got a suspicious email yesterday, something like this:

Quote
Dear Valued Merchant,

This notification is from your payments processor, Intuit Payment Solutions.  We are contacting you with respect to a recent case opened on your behalf.

Please open the attached Merchant Accounting notice.  It has detailed information regarding your case 112939046.  To inquire about your case, please find the contact information needed in the attachment.

Thank you for choosing Intuit Payment Solutions!

It came with an attached .pdf.  Now, I wasn't born yesterday - I don't open strange attachments from financial companies, especially when they only know me as "valued merchant."  And doubly so when the email comes from an address like "IMSDocumentation[AT]innovativemerchant.com" - which doesn't share any part of a domain name with the company I actually work through.

On the other hand, I *did* just use my account this weekend for the first time in months (it's a swipe account that lets me accept credit cards when I do craft fairs - I haven't sold my jewelry other than via Etsy for quite a while so my account just sat dormant).  And when I went digging, I discovered that I had received another email from the same address over the weekend telling me I had to add a bank account to my profile:

Quote
MERCHANT ACCOUNT NUMBER: [number]
Dear [my name],
Thanks for signing up with Intuit Payment Solutions. To make sure you get paid as fast as possible, enter your deposit bank account information.
Tell us where to send your money:
Visit the Merchant Service Center.  <--hyperlink
At the bottom of your account profile's Deposit Account Information section, add your bank account.
Sincerely,
The Intuit Payment Solutions Team
Please do not reply to this message.

That one came with a .pdf also.  Instead of clicking a strange link, I went to the site manually, and I did indeed have to add a bank to my account so they could make the deposit.

So yeah - timing was reasonable and the first email did include my real name and account number, but I wasn't expecting anything about a "case 112939046" and the email still smelled fishy (or phishy).  So I contacted the fraud department via their online form and asked if the email was legit.

I got a second email today, identical to the former one posted above.  So this time I called their customer support line.  You know what's even more fun than 15 minutes of a 1-minute muzak loop interrupted by someone telling me I could be doing this online right now?  Finding out that the fraud department replied to my email about sketchy .pdfs by sending their reply as another sketchy .pdf.

I did some more searching - their fraud site lists a handful of email addresses they send official correspondence from, but none use that particular domain name.  And there's no good way to get an actual email address to complain to - the CSR on the phone didn't have a clue (although she did agree that their system is pretty dumb), and the site only links you to contact forms instead of actual emails to real people.

It's not enough to make me refuse to use their company forever and ever, but if they want to reach me in the future they'll have to try snail mail  >:(
« Last Edit: August 13, 2013, 02:43:31 PM by Slartibartfast »

Redwing

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1481 on: August 13, 2013, 03:52:02 PM »
I received a piece of spam today that started off trying to get me to buy life insurance.  After paging down a little, I found a long and detailed history of Elvis Presley's romantic history.  I almost posted the whole body of the message here, but it was really long. 

Very strange.

laud_shy_girl

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1482 on: August 14, 2013, 02:41:02 AM »
Not a scam, but leaves you wide open to fraud.

So I am with 9mobile (not real  >:D) and I am trying to cancil my account. called and they asked for my pin. Never had a pin so did what it said and went to my on line account to reset it.

All good so far.

I click the forgotten pin button and up pops two boxes asking for memorable name and memorable place.


Right below this is a section telling me what my... wait for it...  memorable name and memorable place are!  :o not reminders. The actual word spelled out.

I am calling this morning to cancel and I will ask to speak to their security department.   My brain hurts
“For too long, we've assumed that there is a single template for human nature, which is why we diagnose most deviations as disorders. But the reality is that there are many different kinds of minds. And that's a very good thing.” - Jonah Lehrer

jayhawk

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1483 on: August 14, 2013, 08:46:26 AM »
Not sure if this is a scam attempt or not? Please let me know your thoughts!

I posted a purse on Craigslist - got a response asking if I'd take less. I said I would and gave a lower amount.  Then got a response saying she wanted to buy this as a gift and was concerned about making sure it was in good condition and was I able to take Paypal?  The English was not the best, not sure if that's am issue or not.

I responded by saying that I was not set up for Paypal and would prefer we meet in person so she could check the condition and that I preferred cash. Have not heard back, which kinds of leads me to believe that this was not an honest transaction. I can't really figure out how Paypal is used in this sort of scam?


VorFemme

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1484 on: August 14, 2013, 09:18:52 AM »
Not sure if this is a scam attempt or not? Please let me know your thoughts!

I posted a purse on Craigslist - got a response asking if I'd take less. I said I would and gave a lower amount.  Then got a response saying she wanted to buy this as a gift and was concerned about making sure it was in good condition and was I able to take Paypal?  The English was not the best, not sure if that's am issue or not.

I responded by saying that I was not set up for Paypal and would prefer we meet in person so she could check the condition and that I preferred cash. Have not heard back, which kinds of leads me to believe that this was not an honest transaction. I can't really figure out how Paypal is used in this sort of scam?



About two years ago, I had someone email ask if I would ship a laptop to them (Craigslist) and tell me that they were sending me the money by PayPal (they seem to have gotten my real email from my reply).  I got a notice of money being sent from "PayPal" - but when I checked my balance at PayPal.com - there was nothing deposited to it.  I sent all their emails to PayPal's fraud department.




Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?