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Author Topic: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers  (Read 2578066 times)

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Yarnspinner

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #465 on: February 05, 2013, 10:24:24 AM »
Here's one for which I am completely stymied:

Sweet elderly male patron calls me to his computer where he is having trouble getting the site to work properly.  After I get the thing working (and he praises me highly) I get a quick look at what he is doing:

He's advertising "an oopurtiny too get in on ground floor OF GREAT INVEsTMENT VenTURE CAPiol GhaNA CORP."  All investors have to do is send him a minimum of $200,000.

I wonder if he even knows what he's doing is illegal.  I DO know from experience that telling him won't work. 

pierrotlunaire0

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #466 on: February 05, 2013, 11:45:43 AM »
^^^^^^^  You have got to get me the email address!  I am always looking for an oopurnity to make money. 
I have enough lithium in my medicine cabinet to power three cars across a sizeable desert.  Which makes me officially...Three Cars Crazy

gramma dishes

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #467 on: February 05, 2013, 11:51:32 AM »
^^^^^^^  You have got to get me the email address!  I am always looking for an oopurnity to make money.

Yeah, and we all need  suggestions as to what we can do with that spare $200,000 we have just lying around!   ;D

jedikaiti

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #468 on: February 05, 2013, 12:00:00 PM »
Heh! I got one very similar, recently, purporting to be from a client of mine.

Except that it was my client's father who was seriously ill in Belgium and needing a Kidney Transplant, and he urgently needed us to let him have 1,500.

Which seemed odd, for a man who is a multi-millionaire. Party as a result of inheriting his late father's very substantial estate. .

Poor man's e-mail account had been hacked and the message sent to all of his contacts. it was pretty sophisticated as the mail came from his address and was signed in his name

I don't remember the details and technicalities but I don't think your email account has to be actually hacked for someone to send mail 'coming' from your adress. Altho if it was signed with the same name then maybe it was, I don't think bots are clever enough or take the time to do that, I should ask a friend who works in IT security.

Yes, this. There's some way that the address can come from another person's address book, so the person who was actually hacked might not be the one who's "sending" it. The hacker might hack Bob and the email yoinks Sue's name out of Bob's address book, and then everybody gets a spam email from Sue even though her actual account is fine.

I'm trying to figure out this one... Mom gets an email with a link to some random sales site that says it comes from me, but isn't from my address. Think a sender line like "From: marysmith@domain.com (JediKaiti)". It's like they got my Mom's address, used my name, but didn't bother spoofing the sender address?
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

WillyNilly

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #469 on: February 05, 2013, 12:22:00 PM »
Heh! I got one very similar, recently, purporting to be from a client of mine.

Except that it was my client's father who was seriously ill in Belgium and needing a Kidney Transplant, and he urgently needed us to let him have 1,500.

Which seemed odd, for a man who is a multi-millionaire. Party as a result of inheriting his late father's very substantial estate. .

Poor man's e-mail account had been hacked and the message sent to all of his contacts. it was pretty sophisticated as the mail came from his address and was signed in his name

I don't remember the details and technicalities but I don't think your email account has to be actually hacked for someone to send mail 'coming' from your adress. Altho if it was signed with the same name then maybe it was, I don't think bots are clever enough or take the time to do that, I should ask a friend who works in IT security.

Yes, this. There's some way that the address can come from another person's address book, so the person who was actually hacked might not be the one who's "sending" it. The hacker might hack Bob and the email yoinks Sue's name out of Bob's address book, and then everybody gets a spam email from Sue even though her actual account is fine.

I'm trying to figure out this one... Mom gets an email with a link to some random sales site that says it comes from me, but isn't from my address. Think a sender line like "From: marysmith@domain.com (JediKaiti)". It's like they got my Mom's address, used my name, but didn't bother spoofing the sender address?

My favorite is when I get one's from myself (when I check the email details its not my email address, but at quick glance to my inbox that's the sender name that come up).

Carotte

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #470 on: February 05, 2013, 12:35:35 PM »
I guess it can be usefull here:

At least with gmail you can enter your address ( youradress@gmail.com) as youradress+something@gmail.com. Say you enter a contest or join a maillinglist, you can put youradress+bbc@gmail.com. That way you can track any mail that seems suspicious, if you receive a 'lottery winner!' from youradress+bbc@gmail.com, then you know it's a fake (and that the bbc sold your adress).
Sadly some website think there's an error and doesn't accept the +something as part of a real email, but it makes it easier to redirect spam if you flag the entire address.
If you're not with gmail (or even then) you can try it by sending yourself a test mail.

jedikaiti

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #471 on: February 05, 2013, 01:11:10 PM »
OOOOOOhhhh, I did not know that - thanks!
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #472 on: February 05, 2013, 01:19:34 PM »
So long as the form developer followed the actual email address specs and not some made up permitted characters test.

A lot of times, poorly created forms will claim that an email containing a '+' is invalid.

 /end rant about people who do poorly in my own profession

magicdomino

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #473 on: February 05, 2013, 01:29:00 PM »
If someone calls claming to be a U.S. Marshal from the Federal Crime Division, about paying your student loan Right Now, and threatens to arrest you if you don't call back within 25 minutes with money, it is a scam.

If you are the "U.S. Marshal" doing the calling, do not call a young woman who will ask her mother for advice.  You will receive a call back within 25 minutes, but it will be from Mama Bear who has (1) called the United States Marshals Service to verify that you are full of it, and (2) Googled "Federal Crime Division."  I don't know what the result was, but I'm sure it wasn't etiquette-approved.  :)

siamesecat2965

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #474 on: February 05, 2013, 05:34:04 PM »
Haha - I just got one. I answered even though the name on my caller id was gibberish and i didn't recognize the number. It was some guy, who could barely speak English, calling about my "microsoft windows computer" nice try since they don't really make computers, and I know its a scam. I just said, hey, I know this is a scam, goodbye and hung up. 

BabylonSister

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #475 on: February 05, 2013, 07:19:45 PM »
Yesterday I got a call saying "Your credit card company has allowed us to call you to offer you a lower rate."


Erm... I don't have a credit card.

WolfWay

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #476 on: February 06, 2013, 05:00:28 AM »
Incidentally, it's pretty easy to spoof a "from" email address if you compose the email inside code. You can put anything you want inside the "from" field when you create it inside code.

We had a practical joker developer at work who spoofed a goofy email from a coworker to tease her. It was easy for everyone in the office to know it didn't come from her pc since she had been standing at the other end of the office from her locked PC.
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Twik

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #477 on: February 06, 2013, 08:37:32 AM »
Haha - I just got one. I answered even though the name on my caller id was gibberish and i didn't recognize the number. It was some guy, who could barely speak English, calling about my "microsoft windows computer" nice try since they don't really make computers, and I know its a scam. I just said, hey, I know this is a scam, goodbye and hung up.

This is a common scam, and one that, as you point out, doesn't make much sense. Presumably there are enough people out there who believe that Microsoft can see into your computer, and wants to help you, though.
"The sky's the limit. Your sky. Your limit. Now, let's dance!"

Girlie

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #478 on: February 06, 2013, 09:14:20 AM »
Can I just tell you how much I ADORE the phone calls I've recieved ever since buying tickets to a local (but supposedly professional) orchestra? Apparently, they sell phone numbers, and then victims - er, customers - will have the privilege of recieving dozens of phone calls about buying "cheap" tickets to see them again (yeah, right).
The phone numbers are ALWAYS unlisted, and they NEVER leave voicemail. The only way I know what's going is because I've looked the phone numbers up on Google and others have related their experiences.

I will NEVER buy tickets for this orchestra again. I do not appreciate having my information sold.

Thipu1

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #479 on: February 06, 2013, 09:18:27 AM »
Have you contacted the orchestra about this?  There's a possibility that the organization doesn't know about this. 

There have been instances in which a low-level employee has stolen information and is using it for personal gain.