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Author Topic: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers  (Read 2581634 times)

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Miss Tickle

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #540 on: February 21, 2013, 11:46:08 PM »
We're suffering another rash of fraud at the moment, so I'd like to remind people that if it sounds too good to be true, it is, if you think people you don't know are trusting you with money, they aren't.

It amazes me people won't stop for a second and think, hey, this doesn't make any sense. I promise, no one is going to give you thousands of dollars on the hope that you'll do as they ask. If someone sends you a cheque for thousands more than you were asking for your old toaster, it's not a good idea to try to cash it without running it by your bank first. Better to be in front of it than behind it, and the bank will thank you. Really.

Morticia

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #541 on: February 22, 2013, 08:08:08 AM »
I got a "Spam Report" email today that asked me to click a link to confirm the "reported email" was spam... Seriously?
Now our mom says she's changed her mind about the devil's brood, they may be evil so she thinks, but at least they're never rude...
                                        -- Big Rude Jake

My travel blog: http://www.stepmonster.ca

Jones

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #542 on: February 22, 2013, 09:51:23 AM »
Story in the news this week that a woman gave $8000 to a stranger for some diamonds, to be used as collateral. The diamonds turned out to be glass. Now Woman A has gone to the media, asking for help identifying the con artist to get her money back because her husband is out of work and she and her children need this money.

The transaction occurred at a mall with multiple jewellers.

A lot of people are accusing Woman A of collaboration with Woman B in order to get the kind hearted public to give her money to replace the funds she may have had swindled from her.
A real desire to believe all the good you can of others and to make others as comfortable as you can will solve most of the problems. CS Lewis

JenJay

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #543 on: February 22, 2013, 11:10:15 AM »
I don't know anyone who could afford to give a stranger $8k while their spouse was unemployed. Smells like a scam!

JenJay

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #544 on: February 22, 2013, 12:45:19 PM »
Okay, last update. I wanted to post this because I'd never even heard of it but the police officer told us it's very common. First, a link he gave us to read up on all the various schemes. I thought it might be helpful for someone.

http://www.ic3.gov/crimeschemes.aspx#item-16

What happened to us is called "reshipping". Basically, someone overseas obtained our credit card info (along with those of many other people). They also advertise "Work from home" opportunities. A person answers the supposed job listing and applies to be a reshipper. The thief uses the stolen card numbers to buy items in bulk and has them sent to the home address of the repackager, who then breaks them up into individual boxes and ships them to the thief. It's a win-win for the thief because if the scheme gets caught, like in our case, it's the repackager who gets busted. Likely their only contact with the thief is an email address and a PO box somewhere overseas. Dead end.

2littlemonkeys

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #545 on: February 22, 2013, 02:55:43 PM »
Story in the news this week that a woman gave $8000 to a stranger for some diamonds, to be used as collateral. The diamonds turned out to be glass. Now Woman A has gone to the media, asking for help identifying the con artist to get her money back because her husband is out of work and she and her children need this money.

The transaction occurred at a mall with multiple jewellers.

A lot of people are accusing Woman A of collaboration with Woman B in order to get the kind hearted public to give her money to replace the funds she may have had swindled from her.

I agree.  If they need the money so bad, why the ehell was she off buying diamonds from some guy at the mall?    :o  I get that gems can be an investment but that just doesn't seem like a wise expenditure during hard times.

Jones

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #546 on: February 22, 2013, 03:04:16 PM »
Here is the news article on the glass diamonds lady.

http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=24131698
A real desire to believe all the good you can of others and to make others as comfortable as you can will solve most of the problems. CS Lewis

Elfmama

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #547 on: February 22, 2013, 03:24:30 PM »
Story in the news this week that a woman gave $8000 to a stranger for some diamonds, to be used as collateral. The diamonds turned out to be glass. Now Woman A has gone to the media, asking for help identifying the con artist to get her money back because her husband is out of work and she and her children need this money.

The transaction occurred at a mall with multiple jewellers.

A lot of people are accusing Woman A of collaboration with Woman B in order to get the kind hearted public to give her money to replace the funds she may have had swindled from her.

I agree.  If they need the money so bad, why the ehell was she off buying diamonds from some guy at the mall?    :o  I get that gems can be an investment but that just doesn't seem like a wise expenditure during hard times.
Diamonds are a TERRIBLE investment, if you pay jewelry store prices for them.  They're marked up anywhere from 300% to 1000%.  I know a young woman who tried to sell her diamond engagement ring back to the jewelry store after her divorce.  Her XH paid around $2500 for the set.  She was offered $60.  No, I didn't leave off a zero.  Sixty dollars.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
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mechtilde

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #548 on: February 22, 2013, 03:56:46 PM »
At some point in the 19th century one of my ancestors bought some dodgy and not entirely legal "diamonds"- my parents still have them in a small bone pot with "Live in Hope" on the lid. Whatever they are, they certainly aren't diamonds...

There's nothing new.

I've been approached by someone in the street offering me a "gold" chain. Yeah. Right. That's either going to be stolen, fake or real and about to be switched for a fake.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2013, 03:58:34 PM by mechtilde »
NE England

Zenith

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #549 on: February 23, 2013, 12:45:37 AM »
The price of retail diamonds make me laugh, especially when I see larger certified gems/diamonds 2/3 to 1/2 cheaper at a pawn shop.


Kaora

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #550 on: February 24, 2013, 04:36:11 PM »
Given, it [Death Valley] is a really gorgeous place. :) I go yearly in winter, when it's cool.  Enough hot days here...

We certainly thought so.  It was fascinating!

I think my favorite places are the Devil's Paintbrush and Badwater. :) Once had lunch at Badwater with my dad and sister, spent the entire time poking fun at the sea level sign. :P

On topic...

I was out yesterday with my BF, and he was going to pickup some medication I needed.  Coming out of the Albertsons, we got stopped AGAIN by the same beggar I mentioned earlier.  We were in the Jeep, and, bam, there's this guy stepping infront of the car and we have to stop.  He comes up and says he needs money until Monday, blahblah, and BF told him truthfully that he didn't have any money; I was the one with it. >:D

We're wondering, if the same guy tries this again, a likely at this point, is it etiquettely okay to start telling him he's tried this on us before, and didn't we just see him last week?

Debbie506

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #551 on: February 24, 2013, 06:38:49 PM »
My boss (a lawyer) got caught in a scam about 10 years ago.  I was on vacation, a temp was filling in secretarial duties.  She got a weird feeling one morning and went into boss's office and found a well-dressed gentleman in there (boss was in court).  Our office set-up is a bit odd (very old building) so it is not completely strange that someone could walk into boss's office without going through secretary - especially if boss left his door unlocked, which he did all the time.  At any rate, she told Mr. X that boss was in court, come back later.

About two weeks later, boss got word  that his bank accounts had been drained.  Apparently, the scam worked as follows:  Mr.X visited my boss's office and another lawyer's office or two (trust accounts, you know!) and stole trust cheques (not from the top of the deck, but in the middle, so the theft wasn't obvious for a week or two).  Then he and his accomplices visited a number of rural mailboxes and stole some check reorders from ordinary citizens.

So, Mr.X lines up in bank, makes deposit to boss's bank account with cheques from lawyer #2 and ordinary citizens (maybe $2,000 or so). Then Mr.X says "holy smokes, I forgot I need $500 for XYZ"...  as the teller just saw him deposit $2,000, she gives him the money.  Rinse and repeat for each account...

My boss is still really bad about leaving his office door unlocked...

weeblewobble

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #552 on: February 24, 2013, 09:16:22 PM »
Did anyone else catch the Dr. Phil episode last week in which a grown son took his single mother to Dr. Phil for an intervention re: her "boyfriend" Danny, a supposedly British man who supposedly worked in South Africa.  She'd sent him more than $187,000 including money that she'd gained through selling off property, inheritance, and straight up taking from her relatives.  And yet, somehow, he just couldn't manage to make it out of South Africa to meet her in person.  In fact, he needed another $150,000 from her so she could access $6 million of his funds that he had supposedly set aside for her.  The bank required some sort of surety to secure the account, he claimed.  She was just convinced that Dr. Phil was going to help her find a way to get this extra $150,000, because that would mean Danny would come see her and that would make everything ok. 

She adamantly refused to believe him when he told her that a bank wouldn't require her to secure an account with her name on it. She refused to think about the logical questions such as: Why would a man with $6 million need her to send him money so he could travel to see her?  Why didn't he just reduce the money he'd supposedly put in her name by $150,000 and secure the account for her?  Why did Danny change his mind at the last minute re: appearing on the Dr. Phil show and then not answer the phone so Dr. Phil could talk to him on the air?

Every time Dr. Phil posed a perfectly logical question, she would say, "You just don't understand."  It got so frustrating, I had to change the channel.  I felt so sorry for her son.

White Dragon

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #553 on: February 24, 2013, 10:08:40 PM »
I couldn't think of any tales for this thread, and the last week I had *three* in one day!

Scam #1 was someone who said "Someone from our number had called her but she wasn't sure who, but that it was probably our shop foreman."
The first part was understandable, happens a lot since only our main # shows on caller display.
The second part...well, we are strictly an office. No shop foreman here.
"If you can tell me what project this relates to, or what you need to accomplish I can get you to the right person."
A little bit more back and forth and she wants to talk to whoever is in charge of our maintenance.
"Sorry, all maintenance is already comtracted."

She actually sounded surprised that we have a - gasp- maintenance contract! Good bye!

Scam #2 was a FAX asking for my help in releasing 54 million $ in development funds from the "late president of Libya, who is now deceased." (One would think so, as he is the late president. Unless he's chronically tardy?)

So I guess I'm a bad person for not doing more to get those development funds freed up!

Scam #3 was someone from a call center who said they were with (unclearly mumbled company) and were we (not quite our company name). I simply asked them to put us on the do not call list.
"I think her scattergun was only loaded with commas and full-stops, although some of them cuddled together for warmth and produced little baby colons and semi-colons." ~ Margo


Twik

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #554 on: February 25, 2013, 07:56:46 AM »
Story in the news this week that a woman gave $8000 to a stranger for some diamonds, to be used as collateral. The diamonds turned out to be glass. Now Woman A has gone to the media, asking for help identifying the con artist to get her money back because her husband is out of work and she and her children need this money.

The transaction occurred at a mall with multiple jewellers.

A lot of people are accusing Woman A of collaboration with Woman B in order to get the kind hearted public to give her money to replace the funds she may have had swindled from her.

I agree.  If they need the money so bad, why the ehell was she off buying diamonds from some guy at the mall?    :o  I get that gems can be an investment but that just doesn't seem like a wise expenditure during hard times.

She probably wasn't buying them, due to the comment about "collateral". It sounds like what I believe was called the "pigeon drop" at one time. Swindler announces she's found some diamonds. If they're not claimed within X days, she'll be able to keep them. But, alas, she has to rush to a vital appointment or something. Could Woman A hold them until she gets back? As a reward, Swindler will split to proceeds later on. But, just to ensure trust, Woman A should put up some money to Swindler - that's fair, right, since she's holding the valuable diamonds and could abscond with them, leaving Swindler with nothing? Then Swindler walks off with the "deposit", and Woman A is left with some glass chips.

It sounds ridiculous when written out, but a fast talking con artist can do well with it, I've heard.
"The sky's the limit. Your sky. Your limit. Now, let's dance!"