Author Topic: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers  (Read 600332 times)

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DaisyG

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1395 on: July 19, 2013, 11:32:26 AM »
Somebody at work just told me that this has worked for one of his neighbours:

Answer the phone in a language other than English.  For us here in Canada, 'Ola' would work, 'Bonjour', maybe not.  I'm thinking about answering in Japanese.  Phonetically here because I have no idea how to spell it:  Koneitchiwa.  Better warn my Dad before I do it, though, or he'll be really confused!  (I don't have call display.)

Extra tip: The way to answer the phone in Spanish is "Bueno!"

In Spain I was taught to answer the phone with "dígame" ("tell me")

Also, on QI (so it's probably true), they said that before the invention of the phone, people would use 'hullo' as an expression of surprise, but afterwards it turned into 'hello' as a way of answering the phone, then into a greeting you could use face-to-face.

Thipu1

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1396 on: July 19, 2013, 11:40:32 AM »
As I understand it, Alexander Graham Bell preferred the term 'Ahoy' as a proper salutation on the telephone. 

cwm

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1397 on: July 19, 2013, 12:46:28 PM »
I have access to a shared inbox at my company. We get a daily digest report of near-certain junk mail from another company. Why we get it, I have no idea. It doesn't matter.

Today, we have two emails from "Dr. Travis Stork" with the subject "Eat to Lose Weight!"

The best part? They came from two separate email addresses. One was mtguq (at) aljaeza (dot) org (dot) sa  and the other was from mtgts (at) arbysbeef (dot) com.

Belle

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1398 on: July 19, 2013, 01:00:16 PM »
As I understand it, Alexander Graham Bell preferred the term 'Ahoy' as a proper salutation on the telephone.
My husband answers the phone, "Ahoy, ahoy." I've never known why - maybe he's trying to go back to the good old days!

RingTailedLemur

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1399 on: July 19, 2013, 01:03:50 PM »
As I understand it, Alexander Graham Bell preferred the term 'Ahoy' as a proper salutation on the telephone.
My husband answers the phone, "Ahoy, ahoy." I've never known why - maybe he's trying to go back to the good old days!

That's how Mr Burns answers the phone in The Simpsons.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1400 on: July 19, 2013, 03:54:38 PM »
Boy do I have a story for this thread!

I left work an hour early because a big storm was about to hit and I wasn't going to get anything done, worrying, so I came home to put my car safe in the garage and move water around in my rainbarrels.

As I got out of my car, two young men were coming up my driveway with clipboards in their hand.  I told them that whatever it was, I wasn't interested.  The spokesman continued, 'We just want to come in and check the age of your furnace.'  To which I replied, 'I'm well aware of the age of my furnace, I'm on top of it, I'm not interested.  Good bye.'  And went around the side of the house to the back yard to check on my garden, in this wind.  It was just starting to rain.

I come back a couple minutes later and these guys are still standing there.  The one guy wants to come into my garage to make a phone call.  I told him no and to go away.  He persisted.  So I got mad.  'I said NO.  GO AWAY.'  He said something about thinking people would be nicer to young people.  As the garage door was closing, I said, 'I would be if you weren't trying to scam me.'

And I called the police when I got inside on the non-emergency number.  The officer I spoke to was well aware of what their spiel was and just wanted the details about why I was calling.  And told me I did exactly the right thing.

I'm still a little shaky.  Although that might have a little to do with the storm and the fact that I was just outside, making sure all my rainbarrels were full.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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Twik

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1401 on: July 19, 2013, 03:59:10 PM »
As I understand it, Alexander Graham Bell preferred the term 'Ahoy' as a proper salutation on the telephone.

Hello and ahoy are related, according to Wikipedia:

Quote
According to the Oxford English Dictionary, hello is an alteration of hallo, hollo,[5] which came from Old High German "halâ, holâ, emphatic imperative of halôn, holôn to fetch, used especially in hailing a ferryman."[6]

"Ferryman! Hello! I mean, Ahoy! I mean, Hail! I mean, the he... with it, I'll swim."
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doodlemor

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1402 on: July 19, 2013, 04:22:10 PM »

As I got out of my car, two young men were coming up my driveway with clipboards in their hand.  I told them that whatever it was, I wasn't interested.  The spokesman continued, 'We just want to come in and check the age of your furnace.'  To which I replied, 'I'm well aware of the age of my furnace, I'm on top of it, I'm not interested. 

I read a story when I was a teenager about the furnace flim flammers, that I think may have been retold in one of the Puzo books.  It's possible that this is an urban legend, but its use does predate the Puzo books.

Supposedly, the FFF went to the home of a member of an organized crime family, and said that they were there to inspect the furnace.  The men in the house let them go down into the basement, where they proceeded to dismantle the furnace and put the pieces all over the basement floor.  The FFF then quoted the home owner an exorbitant price to put the furnace back together in such a way that it would pass their "inspection."

You know where this is going.....  The FFF were treated in such a way by the homeowner and his cohorts that they knew better than to try their scam in that neighborhood again.

Your post is very scary, Outdoor Girl.  I'm glad that you are OK.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2013, 04:25:13 PM by doodlemor »

Outdoor Girl

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1403 on: July 19, 2013, 04:28:03 PM »
I'm still a little shaky.  Who thinks it's a good idea to for two men to approach a single, older woman as she gets out of her car?

I've just come up with a line that I must remember for the next time:  The only people I allow into my home are those I invite.  I did not invite you.  Go away.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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KB

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1404 on: July 20, 2013, 04:43:56 AM »

As I got out of my car, two young men were coming up my driveway with clipboards in their hand.  I told them that whatever it was, I wasn't interested.  The spokesman continued, 'We just want to come in and check the age of your furnace.'  To which I replied, 'I'm well aware of the age of my furnace, I'm on top of it, I'm not interested. 

I read a story when I was a teenager about the furnace flim flammers, that I think may have been retold in one of the Puzo books.  It's possible that this is an urban legend, but its use does predate the Puzo books.

Supposedly, the FFF went to the home of a member of an organized crime family, and said that they were there to inspect the furnace.  The men in the house let them go down into the basement, where they proceeded to dismantle the furnace and put the pieces all over the basement floor.  The FFF then quoted the home owner an exorbitant price to put the furnace back together in such a way that it would pass their "inspection."

You know where this is going.....  The FFF were treated in such a way by the homeowner and his cohorts that they knew better than to try their scam in that neighborhood again.

Your post is very scary, Outdoor Girl.  I'm glad that you are OK.

What a silly thing to do! It's so easy to lock people in basements, which gives you plenty of time to call and report to the police the suspicious vandals you believe are damaging your property...

doodlemor

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1405 on: July 20, 2013, 12:12:41 PM »

As I got out of my car, two young men were coming up my driveway with clipboards in their hand.  I told them that whatever it was, I wasn't interested.  The spokesman continued, 'We just want to come in and check the age of your furnace.'  To which I replied, 'I'm well aware of the age of my furnace, I'm on top of it, I'm not interested. 

I read a story when I was a teenager about the furnace flim flammers, that I think may have been retold in one of the Puzo books.  It's possible that this is an urban legend, but its use does predate the Puzo books.

Supposedly, the FFF went to the home of a member of an organized crime family, and said that they were there to inspect the furnace.  The men in the house let them go down into the basement, where they proceeded to dismantle the furnace and put the pieces all over the basement floor.  The FFF then quoted the home owner an exorbitant price to put the furnace back together in such a way that it would pass their "inspection."

You know where this is going.....  The FFF were treated in such a way by the homeowner and his cohorts that they knew better than to try their scam in that neighborhood again.

Your post is very scary, Outdoor Girl.  I'm glad that you are OK.

What a silly thing to do! It's so easy to lock people in basements, which gives you plenty of time to call and report to the police the suspicious vandals you believe are damaging your property...

As I understand it, KB, organized crime people don't go to the police for assistance.  They take care of things in their own way.

In the original story it was implied that the criminal homeowners knew that they were dealing with petty scammers when the scammers first came to the door.  The organized crime homeowner smirked as he let them start their bag of tricks, and then dealt with them harshly.  The purpose was to keep small time crooks out of the neighborhood.

Yarnspinner

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1406 on: July 20, 2013, 12:54:51 PM »
Back in May, while Dad was visiting, "American Survivors of Breast Cancer Foundation" called.  Dad picked up without checking and found himself promising them a check for $15, which they practically demanded he send YESTERDAY.

They called me a few days later, claiming to be Breast Cancer Survivors Foundation and since I was similarly verklempt, I agreed to send a small donation.  (Declining to give them my credit card, which was probably an excellent call on my part.)

Thought that would  be the end of it.  Oh no.

Next they called back to thank us.  Some times two or three times a day. From two different phone numbers.  One of which called itself "unknown."  At first I thought it was just an error and "too  many telemarketers with too few people to call" type of thing.  But then they started by saying "We'd like to thank you for your recent donation and would like to know how much you would like to pledge this week?" 

I roared into the phone that they had received my donation and it was all the donation they were going to get and to take my name OFF THE CALL LIST.

"Oh, okay," says the lady on the other end.

NEXT DAY, the unknown number calls up again and I picked it up and just listened until someone said "hello".  I said hello and waited. They introduced themselves as calling for Survivors of Childhood Cancer and would I like to make a donation. 

And that was the point where Lily shouted into the phone "I have done research on your sleazy little organization and found out how you work and if you do NOT remove me from ALL your similarly titled "charities" I will call the police."

"Oh, okay," says the woman ever so calmly.

I did do research into it, BTW.  They are "legitimate" in that they DO donate money...however, they give the barest minimum of each dollar to causes that don't amount to a hill of beans.  "Breast Cancer Survivors" cleared over $500000 a few years ago, with (supposedly) ten cents (or less than ten cents) of every dollar going to "programs to help cancer survivors".  According to the articles I found, $437,000 went to the organization for "costs"...but there was no explanation of what the other $63000 went for....most American Breast Cancer survivors can guarantee THEY didn't receive any of it.


CrazyDaffodilLady

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1407 on: July 20, 2013, 08:27:15 PM »
I just remembered this one from years ago. 
I foolishly agreed to give a small donation to someone supposedly calling for a charity.  The caller wanted to know my address so they could come right over and pick it up.  They refused to give me an address to mail it in.
It takes two people to play tug of war. If you don't want to play, don't pick up the rope.

zyrs

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1408 on: July 21, 2013, 01:15:07 AM »
I received an email today- actual title:

WEIRD FOOD KILLED MY UNCLES BLOOD PRESSURE

I decided not to open it because I was laughing too hard


crella

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Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #1409 on: July 21, 2013, 04:46:20 AM »
'Moshi-moshi' means 'speaking, speaking'.

New students of Japanese will sometimes mis-translate it as 'If-if' because 'Moshi' or 'Moshi-mo' is 'if'. But ’moshi-moshi' comes from 'mousu' meaning 'speak'.

If you pick up the phone, and say 'moshi-moshi' and don't hear anything, (connection is bad) you say it again, and if still there's no one there,
it tends to get elongated 'Moshi-mooooshiiii' like 'your last chance to answer before I hang up'.

The only other time it's used , like Tofugu said, is when somebody is zoned out and they don't hear you address them, like 'Hey!'.