News: IMPORTANT UPDATE REGARDING SITE IN FORUM ANNOUNCEMENT FOLDER.

  • May 25, 2018, 11:48:29 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers  (Read 2583299 times)

1 Member and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

PastryGoddess

  • Member
  • Posts: 6445
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2145 on: January 13, 2014, 05:59:20 PM »
I've seen that before.  Which reminds me, a friend just "liked" a post last night that was Walt Disney World offering free tickets, to be given out to a random pick of those who had "liked" the page.  Only it wasn't actually "Walt Disney World," it was "Walt Disney World." (notice the period).  Plus, if you clicked on it, you'd notice that "Walt Disney World.'s" website only had 650 likes.  Whereas the real WDW FB page has something like 11 million likes.  I'm guessing it's a "like" farming site, but I don't know exactly the purpose, just that there *is* some sort of scam.

I've seen a few of these (Carnival Cruise Lines recently). Both Carnival and Disney fake pages had JUST been created. The owners create fake pages to get as many likes and shares as possible, which increases the value of the page, and they will either make money by having ads placed on the page (legal) or selling the page (against Facebook's TOS). Sharing and liking won't do anything harmful, but obviously don't click on strange links as it could be malware.

I hate those - I tried to find the REAL FB page for an airline and couldn't because there were too many bogus pages with the period in the name!

Go to the airline website and click the social media links from there. 

nutraxfornerves

  • Member
  • Posts: 1785
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2146 on: January 16, 2014, 08:51:24 AM »
Go on vacation, board your dog, get burgled. Worker at dog boarding place gave her boyfriend customers' addresses, so he could go biurgle homes while the owners were on vacation. Vacationers who left dogs at PetSmart burglarized

We once had something similar at my office building. Many people traveled on business. In those pre-computer days, it was common for staff to note trips on a wall or desk calendar.  A janitor who worked nights would take down the name of the employee and the travel dates, and sell the information to ne'er-do-wells. 


Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

Thipu1

  • Member
  • Posts: 7439
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2147 on: January 17, 2014, 09:45:33 AM »
The notification to appear in court scam was covered on the local news last night.  That should help things a little. 

MrTango

  • Member
  • Posts: 2905
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2148 on: January 17, 2014, 11:23:27 AM »
I got an email supposedly from Target today.  It contains what claims to be an apology from Target CEO Gregg Steinhafel about the recent data breach.  There's a sentence saying: "I am writing to make you aware that your name, mailing address, phone numbe, or email address may have been taken during the intrusion."

It looks very good, and I didn't even notice any spelling or grammar errors in the message.  How do I know it's fake?  I received it at an email address that I never, ever give out to businesses (it's strictly family/friends only, and I have another Gmail address that I use for business/receipts/etc.)

#borecore

  • Member
  • Posts: 5281
  • Extreme normcore
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2149 on: January 17, 2014, 11:52:45 AM »
Mr Tango, I've gotten the Target email at multiple email addresses, too, and the address it's sent from looks fake, but I googled it, and it's on the Target website as an email address you should add to your trusted messages. This article explains it quite well (if no time to read: takeaway is targetnews@target.bfi0.com is actually legit): http://www.seattlepi.com/technology/businessinsider/article/Everyone-Thinks-This-Target-Email-Is-A-Scam-5150268.php

Friday

  • Member
  • Posts: 1589
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2150 on: January 17, 2014, 12:41:08 PM »
PM me if you have any concern about Target emails

Slartibartfast

  • Member
  • Posts: 10801
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2151 on: January 17, 2014, 01:01:44 PM »
The cynical side of me wonders whether Target sent out a scammy-looking email on purpose.  Fewer people following the link --> fewer people signing up for the credit monitoring service --> fewer people Target has to pay for the service for.  And they still get the credit for being "so helpful" and "doing all they can about the breach."

ETA: Wow, literally as I was posting this I got this email.  Weird!
« Last Edit: January 17, 2014, 01:05:42 PM by Slartibartfast »

MrTango

  • Member
  • Posts: 2905
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2152 on: January 17, 2014, 01:07:41 PM »
Mr Tango, I've gotten the Target email at multiple email addresses, too, and the address it's sent from looks fake, but I googled it, and it's on the Target website as an email address you should add to your trusted messages. This article explains it quite well (if no time to read: takeaway is targetnews@target.bfi0.com is actually legit): http://www.seattlepi.com/technology/businessinsider/article/Everyone-Thinks-This-Target-Email-Is-A-Scam-5150268.php

Interesting.  Even if that's the case, the email was received by the Gmail account I only use for communicating with friends & family, and that I never (and have never) used for "business" purposes.  I'm curious how the got ahold of that address, rather than the address I actually use when I order things from Target.com.

When I get home, I'll check my "business" email address to see if I got it there as well.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2014, 01:12:42 PM by MrTango »

otterwoman

  • Member
  • Posts: 1088
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2153 on: January 17, 2014, 01:50:53 PM »
Mr Tango, I've gotten the Target email at multiple email addresses, too, and the address it's sent from looks fake, but I googled it, and it's on the Target website as an email address you should add to your trusted messages. This article explains it quite well (if no time to read: takeaway is targetnews@target.bfi0.com is actually legit): http://www.seattlepi.com/technology/businessinsider/article/Everyone-Thinks-This-Target-Email-Is-A-Scam-5150268.php

Interesting.  Even if that's the case, the email was received by the Gmail account I only use for communicating with friends & family, and that I never (and have never) used for "business" purposes.  I'm curious how the got ahold of that address, rather than the address I actually use when I order things from Target.com.

When I get home, I'll check my "business" email address to see if I got it there as well.

Something to consider is that scam emails tend to have a link for you to click on. The Target email I received has no links. They want you to type the address into your browser yourself.

MerryCat

  • Member
  • Posts: 1570
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2154 on: January 17, 2014, 02:30:01 PM »
My first contribution to this thread! I ran into a guy at the LRT station who offered me a real, genuine, 4 carat diamond for only $50!

Weird thing is, I actually felt kind of bad about turning him down, even though I'm pretty sure his hungry baby at home is fictitious.

Friday

  • Member
  • Posts: 1589
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2155 on: January 17, 2014, 02:33:37 PM »
The official Target email has no links.  It won't ever.  If you have an email from "Target" with links, or misspellings, it is NOT authentic.  That is 100% certain. 

MommyPenguin

  • Member
  • Posts: 4132
    • My blog!
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2156 on: January 17, 2014, 02:49:31 PM »
You know, I need to remember to tell my kids this when they're fighting me about having to learn to spell.  If you don't learn to spell well, your emails will all look like spam!
Emily is 10 years old!  1/07
Jenny is 8 years old!  10/08
Charlotte is 7 years old!  8/10
Megan is 4 years old!  10/12
Lydia is 2 years old!  12/14
Baby Charlie expected 9/17

gramma dishes

  • Member
  • Posts: 7752
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2157 on: January 17, 2014, 02:52:10 PM »
You know, I need to remember to tell my kids this when they're fighting me about having to learn to spell.  If you don't learn to spell well, your emails will all look like spam!

Then they will tell you that "Okay, we can just text!!  Nothing is spelled right when you text!"   ;D

MrTango

  • Member
  • Posts: 2905
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2158 on: January 17, 2014, 03:28:09 PM »
Mr Tango, I've gotten the Target email at multiple email addresses, too, and the address it's sent from looks fake, but I googled it, and it's on the Target website as an email address you should add to your trusted messages. This article explains it quite well (if no time to read: takeaway is targetnews@target.bfi0.com is actually legit): http://www.seattlepi.com/technology/businessinsider/article/Everyone-Thinks-This-Target-Email-Is-A-Scam-5150268.php

Interesting.  Even if that's the case, the email was received by the Gmail account I only use for communicating with friends & family, and that I never (and have never) used for "business" purposes.  I'm curious how the got ahold of that address, rather than the address I actually use when I order things from Target.com.

When I get home, I'll check my "business" email address to see if I got it there as well.

Something to consider is that scam emails tend to have a link for you to click on. The Target email I received has no links. They want you to type the address into your browser yourself.

I checked it again, and there are indeed no links.  I guess it's not a "scam."  Given the address it was sent to, it's still "spam."
« Last Edit: January 17, 2014, 06:14:51 PM by MrTango »

Tierrainney

  • Member
  • Posts: 1224
  • Where the swans winter
Re: S/O Beggars, Moochers and Scammers
« Reply #2159 on: January 17, 2014, 04:43:03 PM »
My mother was almost taken in by the Grandchild scam yesterday. She got a phone call from "her Granddaughter" being stranded in New York after attending a funeral and something about her car and driving.

She really had my mother going and believing her. My mother made my father leave his golf game so he could come home and help to send the money. But then she realized that the grandchild would only be 14 years old and would never be in New York alone or driving. She called my brother, his wife, and both of the grandchildren of that family's cell phones. Of course it was all a scam.

Now the good news is my Mother likes to talk, has many friends, and will tell all her friends everything. So hopefully everyone at her Church, clubs, work, etc, will hear all about it and will know now not to fall for this one.
Do not taunt Happy Fun Ball.