Author Topic: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.  (Read 19029 times)

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bopper

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #75 on: October 26, 2012, 01:46:27 PM »
"He has it tough enough without you making uninformed comments."

catrunning

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #76 on: October 28, 2012, 09:50:12 PM »
I got this all the time when I was taking my elderly father to the store, to doctor's offices, etc.   He had a series of strokes and could only walk with the help of a walker, and that was on good days.  Other days, we used the wheelchair.   So, naturally, I got a handicapped placard which I used only when I took him places.   Yes, I could have let him out, driven off to park and walked back to him.   But he got very anxious and panicked when left alone, even for a few minutes.

When strangers came up and politely reminded me that I parked in the handicapped spot, I explained about my father and they always apologized and wished me well.  If they gave me grief, I just gave them a cold stare and asked them why they enjoyed terrorizing the elderly.   They would get it when I went around to the trunk, took out the walker or wheelchair, helped him out of the car and slowly --- very, very slowly --- went on our way.   A few mumbled apologies, but most just slunk off.

This is a two-edged sword.   I'm glad that much of the general public feels that the able-bodied who exploit handicapped parking solely for their own convenience should be called out.   I've been out with my dad when all the handicapped parking was taken, and some of it by people who obviously didn't have disabilities and had neither a disability plate or placard.  (Yes, I know that many disabilities are invisible, but when you have school aged jocks wearing their letters and bouncing along, I assume any disabilities they have lie solely in the moral realm.)  On the other hand, people should realize that the disabled person is not necessarily the driver and hold back any comments until they are reasonable certain that no one in the car has a disability.       

camlan

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #77 on: October 29, 2012, 06:45:28 AM »
[snip]
This is a two-edged sword.   I'm glad that much of the general public feels that the able-bodied who exploit handicapped parking solely for their own convenience should be called out.   I've been out with my dad when all the handicapped parking was taken, and some of it by people who obviously didn't have disabilities and had neither a disability plate or placard.  (Yes, I know that many disabilities are invisible, but when you have school aged jocks wearing their letters and bouncing along, I assume any disabilities they have lie solely in the moral realm.)  On the other hand, people should realize that the disabled person is not necessarily the driver and hold back any comments until they are reasonable certain that no one in the car has a disability.       

I always check for the handicapped placard or license plate. If there is one, I  no longer have that vehicle on my radar. Not for me to get into who needs the space and who doesn't. (Although I still have my suspicions about the two obviously very fit young men who jumped out of a pick-up that was so high off the ground I'd need a ladder to get into it.)

Many states are trying to come up with ways to prevent able-bodied friends and relations from using the hang tags. At one point, putting the disabled person's picture on it was considered, but there were concerns about privacy and stalking and other issues. They are still working on it, though.

Then there's the other issue, of people who don't really need them persuading medical personnel to sign off on the form to get one. Still working on that one, too.
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JustEstelle

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #78 on: October 29, 2012, 02:27:23 PM »
[snip]
This is a two-edged sword.   I'm glad that much of the general public feels that the able-bodied who exploit handicapped parking solely for their own convenience should be called out.   I've been out with my dad when all the handicapped parking was taken, and some of it by people who obviously didn't have disabilities and had neither a disability plate or placard.  (Yes, I know that many disabilities are invisible, but when you have school aged jocks wearing their letters and bouncing along, I assume any disabilities they have lie solely in the moral realm.)  On the other hand, people should realize that the disabled person is not necessarily the driver and hold back any comments until they are reasonable certain that no one in the car has a disability.       

I always check for the handicapped placard or license plate. If there is one, I  no longer have that vehicle on my radar. Not for me to get into who needs the space and who doesn't. (Although I still have my suspicions about the two obviously very fit young men who jumped out of a pick-up that was so high off the ground I'd need a ladder to get into it.)

Many states are trying to come up with ways to prevent able-bodied friends and relations from using the hang tags. At one point, putting the disabled person's picture on it was considered, but there were concerns about privacy and stalking and other issues. They are still working on it, though.

Then there's the other issue, of people who don't really need them persuading medical personnel to sign off on the form to get one. Still working on that one, too.


In Texas, the placards are tied to the owner's driver's license number (or ID).  Fairly easy for the police to check to see if the owner is present with a card displaying the placard.

Yvaine

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #79 on: October 29, 2012, 02:30:14 PM »
[snip]
This is a two-edged sword.   I'm glad that much of the general public feels that the able-bodied who exploit handicapped parking solely for their own convenience should be called out.   I've been out with my dad when all the handicapped parking was taken, and some of it by people who obviously didn't have disabilities and had neither a disability plate or placard.  (Yes, I know that many disabilities are invisible, but when you have school aged jocks wearing their letters and bouncing along, I assume any disabilities they have lie solely in the moral realm.)  On the other hand, people should realize that the disabled person is not necessarily the driver and hold back any comments until they are reasonable certain that no one in the car has a disability.       

I always check for the handicapped placard or license plate. If there is one, I  no longer have that vehicle on my radar. Not for me to get into who needs the space and who doesn't. (Although I still have my suspicions about the two obviously very fit young men who jumped out of a pick-up that was so high off the ground I'd need a ladder to get into it.)

Many states are trying to come up with ways to prevent able-bodied friends and relations from using the hang tags. At one point, putting the disabled person's picture on it was considered, but there were concerns about privacy and stalking and other issues. They are still working on it, though.

Then there's the other issue, of people who don't really need them persuading medical personnel to sign off on the form to get one. Still working on that one, too.


In Texas, the placards are tied to the owner's driver's license number (or ID).  Fairly easy for the police to check to see if the owner is present with a card displaying the placard.

What would they do in the case of a minor with a disability, who was too young to have a driver's license? I hope they wouldn't just emblazon the SSN on it!  ;D

rashea

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #80 on: October 29, 2012, 02:37:17 PM »
Mine in Vermont has it's own registration card, just like the one for the car.
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O'Dell

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #81 on: October 29, 2012, 02:43:04 PM »
[snip]
This is a two-edged sword.   I'm glad that much of the general public feels that the able-bodied who exploit handicapped parking solely for their own convenience should be called out.   I've been out with my dad when all the handicapped parking was taken, and some of it by people who obviously didn't have disabilities and had neither a disability plate or placard.  (Yes, I know that many disabilities are invisible, but when you have school aged jocks wearing their letters and bouncing along, I assume any disabilities they have lie solely in the moral realm.)  On the other hand, people should realize that the disabled person is not necessarily the driver and hold back any comments until they are reasonable certain that no one in the car has a disability.       

I always check for the handicapped placard or license plate. If there is one, I  no longer have that vehicle on my radar. Not for me to get into who needs the space and who doesn't. (Although I still have my suspicions about the two obviously very fit young men who jumped out of a pick-up that was so high off the ground I'd need a ladder to get into it.)

Many states are trying to come up with ways to prevent able-bodied friends and relations from using the hang tags. At one point, putting the disabled person's picture on it was considered, but there were concerns about privacy and stalking and other issues. They are still working on it, though.

Then there's the other issue, of people who don't really need them persuading medical personnel to sign off on the form to get one. Still working on that one, too.


In Texas, the placards are tied to the owner's driver's license number (or ID).  Fairly easy for the police to check to see if the owner is present with a card displaying the placard.

How does that work for people who don't drive? My grandmother had placard that could be hung from the mirror of any car she drove or rode in. That was especially helpful after she had a stroke and wasn't allowed to drive anymore. My husband also had a similar placard that had dates on it after he had surgery on his leg. I'm just curious. :)

I'm like you...if I see an indication that the car is rightfully parked in a handicap spot, I don't think anything more about it. For whatever reason, handicap spots seem to be a hot button issue for a lot of people. Not just when they see people parking in them illegally.When I worked in a store, I got a dressing down from a customer about a variety of issues including, in his opinion, having too many handicap parking spaces (mandated by the state and the store had say in it). He also included in his diatribe the spelling of my name from my name tag and it's origin. That incident put into my mind that some people have anger issues and handicap parking is the type of thing to trip their trigger...it's unfair to them if they can't get that close parking spot seems to be the argument.

That's part of the reason I think that a short generic explanation or none at all with an icy look and then walking away is the best way to handle these situations. It's a "don't engage the crazy" type of thing. The icy glare is there to let the person know that you won't be intimidated or goaded into arguing with them.
Do I contradict myself? Very well, then I contradict myself, I am large, I contain multitudes.
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Jones

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #82 on: October 29, 2012, 02:51:15 PM »
Theoretically, non-drivers can get a state issued ID. It has a picture and a number, but has nothing to do with driving.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #83 on: October 29, 2012, 02:52:38 PM »
My Dad had a hang tag for 6 months when he was recovering from hip replacement surgery.  It is expired now but he's kept the tag and uses it when there is no other close parking.   ::)  I keep telling him that if he still needs the darn thing occasionally, get his doctor to give him a new one!  Just because he has it doesn't mean he has to use it all the time.

And since he walks with a cane and a very noticeable limp, it's not like anyone is going to call him on it.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #84 on: October 29, 2012, 02:58:37 PM »
Theoretically, non-drivers can get a state issued ID. It has a picture and a number, but has nothing to do with driving.

I know, but is that noted somewhere on a hanging placard? And don't even drivers get one for when they ride in another person's vehicle?
Do I contradict myself? Very well, then I contradict myself, I am large, I contain multitudes.
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Yvaine

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #85 on: October 29, 2012, 03:05:25 PM »
Theoretically, non-drivers can get a state issued ID. It has a picture and a number, but has nothing to do with driving.

Well, I looked at the info for my locale and apparently there's nothing barring a child getting a state ID. I didn't realize that and thought they were just for people who were of driving age but didn't drive--you learn something new every day. :)

camlan

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #86 on: October 29, 2012, 03:57:21 PM »
My Dad had a hang tag for 6 months when he was recovering from hip replacement surgery.  It is expired now but he's kept the tag and uses it when there is no other close parking.   ::)  I keep telling him that if he still needs the darn thing occasionally, get his doctor to give him a new one!  Just because he has it doesn't mean he has to use it all the time.

And since he walks with a cane and a very noticeable limp, it's not like anyone is going to call him on it.

Is he aware that since it is expired, he could be ticketed for parking in a handicapped spot? I'd hate for that to happen to someone, when they could get a legal placard and not have to worry.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


mich3554

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #87 on: October 29, 2012, 04:00:06 PM »
Theoretically, non-drivers can get a state issued ID. It has a picture and a number, but has nothing to do with driving.

I know, but is that noted somewhere on a hanging placard? And don't even drivers get one for when they ride in another person's vehicle?

I received an ID card to go with my h/c placard.  As I can't drive right now, the ID card stays with me, so the placard can only be used when I am in the car.  Officials have the right to ask for my ID.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #88 on: October 29, 2012, 04:03:57 PM »
My Dad had a hang tag for 6 months when he was recovering from hip replacement surgery.  It is expired now but he's kept the tag and uses it when there is no other close parking.   ::)  I keep telling him that if he still needs the darn thing occasionally, get his doctor to give him a new one!  Just because he has it doesn't mean he has to use it all the time.

And since he walks with a cane and a very noticeable limp, it's not like anyone is going to call him on it.

Is he aware that since it is expired, he could be ticketed for parking in a handicapped spot? I'd hate for that to happen to someone, when they could get a legal placard and not have to worry.

Oh, he knows.  But figures, 'They'll never look at the date anyway'.  I always thought I inherited my stubborness from my mother.  Since she died, I realize that Dad is very stubborn, too.  I keep telling him to go to the doctor and get a new one.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

O'Dell

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Re: When a child is the "owner" of a handicapped parking placard.
« Reply #89 on: October 29, 2012, 04:05:31 PM »
Theoretically, non-drivers can get a state issued ID. It has a picture and a number, but has nothing to do with driving.

I know, but is that noted somewhere on a hanging placard? And don't even drivers get one for when they ride in another person's vehicle?

I received an ID card to go with my h/c placard.  As I can't drive right now, the ID card stays with me, so the placard can only be used when I am in the car.  Officials have the right to ask for my ID.

Ah I see. I don't remember my husband having anything like that (in Michigan) but maybe I didn't pay close enough attention to notice. :)
Do I contradict myself? Very well, then I contradict myself, I am large, I contain multitudes.
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