Author Topic: Calling the police.  (Read 4229 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

MOM21SON

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3028
Calling the police.
« on: October 13, 2012, 07:33:52 PM »
I hear this a lot on these boards.  I am usually baffled.  The police in my area are scarce.  We have a city police department and a county sheriffs department.  They are spread very thin.  Where I live, in the county, only the sheriffs department would come and it must be something really bad.  If it is not bad, the wait could be hours, to days.

So what is your local law enforcement like?  Just curious.

siamesecat2965

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8662
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2012, 07:38:01 PM »
Where I live, each town, municipality, city etc has their own police force.  And then each county has their own, plus the state police.  Same with fire and EMS/paramedics.  I know a lot of places have county only; like where my mom is in VA and also in MD, where I went to school.

Not that I've had to call them; but i think they're pretty responsive, since they only cover their own specific town.  Of course, esp fire, they help out, as many of the depts aren't that large.  I know in the town I grew up in, in the last 6-8 months, there were a couple large fires that destroyed businesses, and other surrounding towns responded.

GratefulMaria

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 553
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2012, 07:49:10 PM »
Small city here.  Our police have a pretty quick response to car accidents, even minor ones.  Umm, I have reason to know they are proactive, straightforward, and generous with someone who's been speeding.   :-[  Luckily, we haven't needed them for anything more serious.  I've heard they're spread thin, often on domestics.   :(

AngelicGamer

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4012
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2012, 07:54:19 PM »
My idea on this is going to be very skewed because of one thing - I live in a suburb of Chicago.

There's a fire station two blocks up from where I live.  I am forever thankful for that as the stairs to the basement collapsed with me on them.  They were here in minutes, after the call got transferred to them from the non-emergency number.  Since I was standing, talking, and nothing hurt at that moment in time, I didn't want mom calling 911.  So the non-emergency number was called.

The main police station is in the downtown area.  It's about 20 minutes away from where I live.  I've never had to call them but you always see them about. 

With the other places I've lived, I've always noticed police about and doing patrols.  I doubt I would ever have to wait a day for someone to come. 




"Life's tough, huh?  And then you die." ~ Buck, the Magnificent Seven.

MOM21SON

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3028
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2012, 08:03:21 PM »
Our paramedics/fire department are awesome.  I see them a lot. 

Once when DS and I were behind a driver that was weaving a lot, i remembered from this site to call the cops.  She did wreck her weaving van and I called, they never came.  She left and I left. 

Jones

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2559
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2012, 08:07:22 PM »
My town is similar to what siamesecat2965 describes. The city has its own force, there is a municipality with the same zip code but a different name that also has its own force, and then there is a sheriff's department (for the county, I believe). Highway patrol are payed by the state, I think.

When I called the non emergency number to report a dog that had been tied up on the sidewalk and abandoned without water this summer a car arrived to where I was within 20-25 minutes. It helped that I described the noise as a "nuisance">:D, the girl in dispatch had asked me to just bring it water myself (not my dog! I brought it water but wasn't going to leave it there...)   A month or so ago, there was a story in the local news about an incident in which a man looked out his window and saw another man dragging a woman between houses, she was fighting the action. He called the police. A deputy, a city officer and a highway patrolman showed up in time to catch the guy with his pants down, literally. All three had simply been nearby due to their regular patrols criss crossing each other's paths. That guy is waiting for trial now, and I wouldn't want to be his defense lawyer with the witnesses available who can testify to the crime.
 
I'm really grateful to be living in a place with good response time again. I used to live in a place where I had to call in a creeper, they didn't show up to investigate for about 2-2.5 hours and by then, of course, there were only footprints. Another time I witnessed an accident and called 911, only to get the busy signal, over and over again. Sure, there are corrupt officers here, like anywhere, but overall they are pretty great.

Adelaide

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 938
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2012, 09:37:51 PM »
I'm from a pretty small town (about 30,000 people) and honestly, the police were very hands-on. I was once pulled over for speeding by a cop that was lurking with permission in my grandfather's driveway, finishing up a sandwich my grandmother had just made him. When my brother would go walking down the main road he would usually ask a police officer to drive him home if he didn't want to walk. I think siamesecat2965's situation is pretty similar to the way ours was.

I will say that I'm in a larger city for law school (about 150,000 people) and so far the police have been awesome. They're not everywhere (like they were back home) unless there's an emergency or an event, but I accidentally messed up once in traffic and wasn't given a ticket for it, and when I can't find a lot to park in the police officers are very helpful.

MERUNCC13

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 147
  • A proud member of the Niner Nation!
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2012, 09:45:25 PM »
Here in the Charlotte, NC area the City and County Police Departments combined about 20 years ago and patrol both the City of Charlotte and the unincorporated areas of Mecklenburg County and back up any of the police departments of the surronding towns in the county.  They are pretty responsive to any calls coming from 911 unless it is one of those days that looks like everything is jumping off at the same time. Our sheriff's department is responsible for the county jail (or as I call it the County Hotel) and serving warrants, evictions or restraining orders. 

The city fire department is our first responders and have EMT's on the trucks as well as the rescue squads - MEDIC has the paramedics (and they are handsome - at least the men are!) and the training.  They cover the entire county including the surronding towns - each of them have their own fire departments and the unincorporated areas (which there is not a lot left here) have volunteer fire and rescue squads with back up from the City of Charlotte for large emergencies.  :)
Life likes to be taken by the hand and told, I'm with you, let's go! Maya Angelou

Iris

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3867
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2012, 09:50:16 PM »
I've only had to call the police once in the city where I now live, years ago, when staying at a house that a friend and her sister were renting. Friend woke in the night after hearing someone trying to get in the window. She screamed and we were pretty sure he had gone away, so we called the non-emergency number to alert them. They told us that that indeed counted as an emergency and put us through to that line. The police were there in about 10 minutes or so. Of course by that time the guy was long gone from our house but the police made a LOT of noise (probably woke the rest of the neighbourhood) just to let him know that he should maybe cancel his plans for the evening...

I have also lived in a tiny country town where the police station was only manned during the day. At night, even for a murder, there could be no-one there for at least an hour. So we did tend to deal with things more informally. For example the young people across the road had a loud party that STARTED at 3am and went until about 4 am, when their next door neighbour shouted out that he was going to come over and kick their behinds if they didn't shut up. It was amazing, every. single. man. in the neighbourhood decided that their lawns needed mowing, whippersnipping, leaf-blowing etc as early as is usually decent the next morning. We never had a problem again :)
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

HoneyBee42

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 610
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2012, 10:03:22 PM »
Where I used to live, I was in a city of ~160k.  We had the city police, and theoretically the county sheriff could also patrol there (but rarely did unless it was a special enforcement like when they were doing a blitz to get everyone using a cell phone while driving).  The suburbs also sometimes had police agencies and others only had the sheriff dept.  Suburbs with police departments tended to get much quicker responses on minor crimes.

In the city, response time varied *widely*.  Sometimes, it'd take a few hours to get the police to respond (non-emergency).  After awhile during my nightmare of a divorce, the police were *very* quick to respond to my calls for service.  Then when I got my case bumped up to a detective, within 24 hrs of completing my statement (so that he could then do all the other paperwork necessary to get the warrant), he had arrested my ex (who was violating my order of protection by stalking me).  They were also great when one of my neighbors (rental property) had a dog that was horribly abused.  It was a young pit bull that they allowed to breed (although I later learned that the size was more typical of a 6mo dog of that breed, so apparently that was the dog's first heat, too) and then tied up in the back porch by a leash, and that dog jumped out of the window on more than one occasion (kind of hanging there, the leash didn't allow it to put feet on the ground.  Well, calls to Animal Control didn't get an immediate response (they were the agency I was first directed to), so the next time the dog ended up hanging by the neck from the window, I called the police, and they came, a young female officer took the dog away, and they took care of the 'owner' of the dog, too as the puppies were all just on the floor in the back porch, no one had ever cleaned up the poop, and some of them had died.  A month after that, Animal Control called me to get more info.

Where I live now is a much smaller location--a city of ~16k surrounded by farmland.  There is also a sheriff's department for the county and they are also within city limits sometimes.  We also have state police due to the interstates.  The city police are very quick to respond, but thankfully I have had almost zero need for their direct services.

Pippen

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1218
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2012, 10:16:06 PM »
One trick I have learnt is that if you have the offender with you they are out like a shot. Something to do with targets and arresting someone in the act is high up there. Also I think it makes it easier paperwork wise. We caught some kids vandalising my friends car and they only made it maybe 60-80 metres before 2 cop cars descended on them and another one arrived a minute or so later and was most disappointed he had missed out. It must have been a slow night.

Frostblooded

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1246
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2012, 10:47:46 PM »
Area of around 60,000 residents, the police respond fairly quickly and are fairly good at their jobs. They can't always resolve a problem but they do their best with the little pay that they get. They're pretty good about learning who cries for wolf, and they try to treat situations on a case-by-case basis. I honestly wouldn't feel safe living in an area where the police have such a poor response.

camlan

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8538
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2012, 11:09:53 PM »
My experiences.

Town of about 23,000 in rural Connecticut. Had it's own police force of about 40 people. Called 911 at 10 pm one night because I could hear a couple of men moving about in the front yard. Police were there within 5 minutes. (Turned out the men I heard were police officers searching for something a fleeing suspect had thrown away, but I was told I did the right thing in calling the police.)

Smaller, more rural town in Connecticut. No police force, but a state trooper was stationed in the town. Called the police when a neighbor ran into my apartment, frightened that someone was in her apartment. State trooper was there in 10 minutes.

Same town, visiting a friend for dinner. Apartment downstairs started blaring music. Friend went downstairs to talk with neighbors. Music was actually coming from apartment two floors down. They refused to lower the noise. Called police, took an hour for the state trooper to show up.

Town in Massachusetts, right next to Boston. Population about 45,000. Had own police force and fire department. Had to call the fire department when a small fire broke out under the front porch of our house. Police were there in about 3 minutes, fire department (three fire trucks, one fire chief's car, EMTs) were there within 5 minutes.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


greencat

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2410
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2012, 11:34:09 PM »
I live in the ridiculously sprawling metro area of a big city.  To give you an idea - the university down the street from me has a student population the size of the capital of Wyoming.  They have their own sizable police department. There are some areas around here with lightning fast police response times, because they're incorporated municipalities that have their own police departments.  However, I live in an area that, although right in the middle of the university district and right off a major artery, is part of the unincorporated county, and therefore, my only responders are the county sheriffs.  I know if I call the cops, I have at least a 15 minute wait for serious things.  Myself and FIVE of my neighbors called in to report gunshots one night and it took half an hour before anyone showed up.  Reports of break-ins and the like can take more than an hour.

mmswm

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2158
Re: Calling the police.
« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2012, 03:26:22 AM »
I live in the ridiculously sprawling metro area of a big city.  To give you an idea - the university down the street from me has a student population the size of the capital of Wyoming.  They have their own sizable police department. There are some areas around here with lightning fast police response times, because they're incorporated municipalities that have their own police departments.  However, I live in an area that, although right in the middle of the university district and right off a major artery, is part of the unincorporated county, and therefore, my only responders are the county sheriffs.  I know if I call the cops, I have at least a 15 minute wait for serious things.  Myself and FIVE of my neighbors called in to report gunshots one night and it took half an hour before anyone showed up.  Reports of break-ins and the like can take more than an hour.

This sounds an awful lot like my home town. The only reason I ever got a decent response time the few times I had to call the cops was because I called them "officially" on my home phone and text messaged my neighbor across the street, who was a cop.  I could generally rely on her showing up and speeding things up.
Some people lift weights.  I lift measures.  It's a far more esoteric workout. - (Quoted from a personal friend)