Author Topic: How to let someone go nicely  (Read 2931 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

enjoyetiquettehell

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 165
How to let someone go nicely
« on: October 15, 2012, 09:40:18 AM »
Hello,

I am in a predicament.  I hired someone without properly finding out if she had the right skills for the job.  The person had experience working in the field but does not have the experience needed for the position that I hired her for.  In other words her computer skills are limited and I find that I can't teach her what she needs to know about the job itself due to her lack of computer skills.   I don't have the resources or the time needed to train her properly and also feel that she will not be ready to work independently for a very long time if ever.

Can you please give me some ideas on how to let her go. 

Thank you very much
EVa

Kaypeep

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2325
Re: How to let someone go nicely
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2012, 09:47:33 AM »
If she's only been there a short time I would let her go by saying "Well you've been here for 2 months now and while you're very good at _____ a big part of this job is ______ and it appears you don't have the computer skills required to do those duties.  I'm afraid that you're not the right fit for this position and we have to let you go.  If anything else comes up though that might be a better match to your abilities, please don't hesitate to apply because I do think you are a good employee, just not the right fit for this position."

enjoyetiquettehell

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 165
Re: How to let someone go nicely
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2012, 09:52:48 AM »
I forgot to mention that she has only been with us a week.  But I feel that she learned very little in a week.  It is a small but busy office and I only have room for two people in that office.  The other position requires years of school and a license.  The office can not run without these two essential positions.

Cat-Fu

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 523
  • My cat is a ninja
Re: How to let someone go nicely
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2012, 10:18:55 AM »
I admit, I'm having a bit of trouble getting past the part where you say you hired this person without properly finding out if she had the right skills for the job. How did that happen? Did she lie on her resume? Did you check with her references?

A week is a short amount of time, so I really think you need to level with this employee about the skills required and your mistake before you move on to firing. In any case, this is a great article about firing someone: http://quickbase.intuit.com/blog/2012/10/11/how-to-fire-an-employee/
“Poetry is a sword of lightning, ever unsheathed, which consumes the scabbard that would contain it.” PBS

Petticoats

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3494
Re: How to let someone go nicely
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2012, 10:37:14 AM »
I think this is a good situation for "I'm afraid this isn't working out / this job isn't a good fit for you."

TootsNYC

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 31734
Re: How to let someone go nicely
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2012, 12:25:07 PM »
I think you can even say, "I didn't check carefully enough about your computer skills, and I'm sorry to have made this mistake. It wasn't fair to you. But I've realized that it's simply going to be too difficult for our small office to provide you with the on-the-job training that you'd need to be successful here."
   

Kaypeep

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2325
Re: How to let someone go nicely
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2012, 12:29:23 PM »
I think you can even say, "I didn't check carefully enough about your computer skills, and I'm sorry to have made this mistake. It wasn't fair to you. But I've realized that it's simply going to be too difficult for our small office to provide you with the on-the-job training that you'd need to be successful here."
 

I agree, this is the best way to go in light of your explanation.  Cut your losses and use this as a learning experience.  Perhaps offer some severance pay if you can as a consolation.

NyaChan

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4107
Re: How to let someone go nicely
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2012, 12:50:13 PM »
I think you can even say, "I didn't check carefully enough about your computer skills, and I'm sorry to have made this mistake. It wasn't fair to you. But I've realized that it's simply going to be too difficult for our small office to provide you with the on-the-job training that you'd need to be successful here."
 

I agree, this is the best way to go in light of your explanation.  Cut your losses and use this as a learning experience.  Perhaps offer some severance pay if you can as a consolation.

I agree with Toots & Kaypeep:  honest, but firm. 

Jones

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2669
Re: How to let someone go nicely
« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2012, 12:54:24 PM »
I can see how it would be easy to overlook if someone has the correct skills. Several years ago my supervisor at the time was hiring a person to be in an entry-level job. This person claimed similar classes to my HS experience on her resume (basic computer skills, word processing and spreadsheet stuff). I had a few higher qualifications, but my supervisor felt that this person--who would be working alongside and slightly below me--had adequate knowledge for beginning the job.

This girl asked me everything. From "How do you calculate a total in Excel [spreadsheet]?" to "How do you update a quote [in a form designed on Microsoft Word--only the form price needed changed]"? One day I gave her a crash course in the goodies of Excel spreadsheets, and the wonderful things the buttons could do for us. "How did you learn all this?" she asked me.
"In XYZ class in high school."

"Oh, that's my problem," she giggled, "I was always skipping that class to get high."

My supervisor overheard and Was Not Amused. She also was not kind about cutting the girl loose a week or so later, when her work did not rise to the afternoon of training I had given her. OP, if your new hire lied or misrepresented herself and her experience, I think you do not need to be "kind" per se, but simply acknowledge the fact you understood she had XYZ skills and since she does not, you need to find someone who does.

NyaChan

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4107
Re: How to let someone go nicely
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2012, 12:57:46 PM »
I'm wondering what she put on her resume - I don't even put that I have computer skills on there anymore myself because I know I have enough to handle whatever is necessary short of a new program or something really advanced.  However, she may have just put, "Proficient in Microsoft Office" or generally claimed to have computer skills, but really just meant, yes I can type and know how to use the internet.

bopper

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 12535
Re: How to let someone go nicely
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2012, 01:25:59 PM »
"NewEmployee, when I hired you, I assumed by XYZ on your resume that you had basic computer skills to go along with the field knowledge you described.  Unfortunately, I  am finding that I can't teach you what you need to know about the job itself due to your lack of computer skills and I do not have the resources to train you on computers. It is vital to the office that someone be able to do <your position> right away so I am sorry, but you are not a good fit for this job.  I will give you 2 weeks severance pay (or whatever) .  We can stop by your desk to pick up your things and I will walk you out. "

"But I can learn computers!"

"Based on what I have seen this week, I don't feel comfortable that you can work independently for quite some time.  In this position I need some one who can work by themselves with minimal supervision immediately.  Thank you for your efforts and I am sorry this did not work out."

enjoyetiquettehell

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 165
Re: How to let someone go nicely
« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2012, 02:15:44 PM »
You all have given me some great ideas.  Basically I made the mistake of hiring her because I knew her and she worked in the same field but in a total different capacity.   The position I hired her for looks easy on the outside but it really isn't.  Even though she used computers for the other position, it was very different and did not require knowledge of microsoft office and windows. 


I really learned a lesson with this. 

Take care
Eva

JustCallMePat

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 162
Re: How to let someone go nicely
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2012, 07:42:47 PM »
There's a lot of good advice here that I agree with - be kind, and be firm.  And I'd add only that after informing her, immediately get her out the front door to avoid any unpleasant reaction, or unfortunate actions, on her part.  If she's going to react badly - weeping, screaming, etc. - better she do it in her car (or on the sidewalk) outside the boundaries of the business.  On your part, keep it all as a business decision and nothing personal.