Author Topic: Chivalry Comes In All Sizes  (Read 1567 times)

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Xena_Xavier

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Chivalry Comes In All Sizes
« on: August 15, 2007, 04:06:30 AM »
This is my Feel Good Story of the year.

Five months ago I badly injured my hand, and my whole arm had to be in a sling for several weeks.  It was very painful and made the slightest task difficult to impossible.

One day I had to pick up some groceries.  I was wandering around the supermarket with a handbasket, my painkiller was wearing off and I felt very down.  I set my basket down to kneel down and get something off a bottom shelf (sod's law, it was at the back too), when I saw my basket being picked up out of the corner of my eye.  I looked up and saw a little boy, he couldn't have been more than 6 or 7, holding my basket and smiling at me.  He asked me if he could help me with my shopping.

The first thing I asked him was where his mother was - shame we now live in a world where we have to do that.  He pointed up the aisle, and she was standing not far away.  She nodded and smiled at me.  I then asked him "Doesn't your mum need help with her shopping?"

"My mum hasn't got a busted arm," he replied.  (If a studio audience had been watching this, this is where they would have gone "Aaaaawwwwww....." in unison.)

I thanked him for his offer, said I was managing OK, but asked if he could reach the item I wanted from the bottom shelf.  This he did, and popped it in my basket.  I let him accompany me down the aisle, getting things for me on the shelves he could reach.  At the end of the aisle I thanked him, told him his parents should be proud of him for being such a good boy, and sent him back to his mother.  I wanted to buy him a little toy or piece of candy as a reward, but you're not supposed to teach children to take treats from strangers.  And I couldn't spot them again, to give the reward to his mum, when I reached the checkout.

There you have it, proof that chivalry isn't dead.  I hope that little guy takes his kindness and good manners into adulthood.

Anyone have a similar story?

mrsbrandt

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Re: Chivalry Comes In All Sizes
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2007, 11:53:40 PM »
That's really really sweet!

Only me

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Re: Chivalry Comes In All Sizes
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2007, 12:51:58 PM »
HI

I only have stories where people have let me do something for them and don't make a deal out of. Cause sometimes when I helped it got me out of a bad mood. Doing some random act of help makes me feel good.

xDolley

geordicat

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Re: Chivalry Comes In All Sizes
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2007, 09:53:09 PM »
This is my Feel Good Story of the year.

Five months ago I badly injured my hand, and my whole arm had to be in a sling for several weeks.  It was very painful and made the slightest task difficult to impossible.

One day I had to pick up some groceries.  I was wandering around the supermarket with a handbasket, my painkiller was wearing off and I felt very down.  I set my basket down to kneel down and get something off a bottom shelf (sod's law, it was at the back too), when I saw my basket being picked up out of the corner of my eye.  I looked up and saw a little boy, he couldn't have been more than 6 or 7, holding my basket and smiling at me.  He asked me if he could help me with my shopping.

The first thing I asked him was where his mother was - shame we now live in a world where we have to do that.  He pointed up the aisle, and she was standing not far away.  She nodded and smiled at me.  I then asked him "Doesn't your mum need help with her shopping?"

"My mum hasn't got a busted arm," he replied.  (If a studio audience had been watching this, this is where they would have gone "Aaaaawwwwww....." in unison.)

I thanked him for his offer, said I was managing OK, but asked if he could reach the item I wanted from the bottom shelf.  This he did, and popped it in my basket.  I let him accompany me down the aisle, getting things for me on the shelves he could reach.  At the end of the aisle I thanked him, told him his parents should be proud of him for being such a good boy, and sent him back to his mother.  I wanted to buy him a little toy or piece of candy as a reward, but you're not supposed to teach children to take treats from strangers.  And I couldn't spot them again, to give the reward to his mum, when I reached the checkout.

There you have it, proof that chivalry isn't dead.  I hope that little guy takes his kindness and good manners into adulthood.

Anyone have a similar story?

That is really a feel good story!  Of course he's learning those manners from someone.. points to his parents!

I like helping out when I can, where I can.  I was a single mom (still am.. LOL) and I'll never forget what people did to help me out.  People I'd never seen before and haven't seen since, but ... I've never forgotten.  Like the gas station guy who insisted I fill my tank the morning I could only afford to put in $2.. told me to pay him back when I could, then when I tried to give him the money, he 'didn't remember' the incident!  He also fixed my car for me at some deeply discounted rates.  Cost me a plate of home made cookies! 

Light travels faster than sound.  That's why some people appear bright until they open their mouth.