Author Topic: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?  (Read 3935 times)

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songbird

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lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« on: October 18, 2012, 10:24:12 PM »
There have been some recent changes at work.  i used to know everyone on our floor, but recently another department joined us and there are a lot of new faces. 

We have a small lunchroom, it includes a few tables, a refrigerator, coffee machine and microwave, and a couple of vending machines.


The lunchroom was empty the other day.  I had one of those prepackaged meals, the kind where you cook the rice then add the sauce.   I added water to the rice and put it in the microwave for 3 1/2 minutes, as per package directions.    Then I walked over to the vending machine to buy a coke.

A woman I didn't know came into the lunchroom, walked right past me to the microwave, opened the microwave door and reached in as if to take my food out. 

When I walked over there, she said "Oh, is this yours?"  and then "I didn't realize the microwave was still running, I couldn't hear it because of the sound of the vending machine."

I thought "Yes, but you could still see the timer counting down,"  but I didn't say anything.  I closed the microwave door and pressed the "start" button.

And then she said "Three minutes?  Your food is going to be very hot when you take it out."

So in other words, she DID  see the timer but was going to take my food out anyhow. 

I resisted the urge to call her a liar and instead said something about the rice needing three minutes to cook properly.

I think I handled this correctly.  Or should I have confronted her?

Venus193

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2012, 10:27:09 PM »
You were OK.  She saw the timer light and was trying to cover up her bad behavior.

doodlemor

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2012, 10:53:47 PM »
You did a good job.  You did confront her, and she backed off with her untruths.

Keep an eye on this person in the future.  She has shown that she will take unfair advantage.

johelenc1

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2012, 10:55:37 PM »
She took your food out WHILE it was cooking?  That can really mess up some of those microwavable things.  That takes a lot of gal.

Ceallach

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2012, 11:04:01 PM »
She thought it was unattended and that she could sneakily use the microwave, set yours going again and you'd never know the difference.      ::)

It was underhanded, and she lied because she got caught.

I think you handled it very well all things considered!
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songbird

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2012, 11:37:50 PM »
She took your food out WHILE it was cooking?  That can really mess up some of those microwavable things.  That takes a lot of gal.

I stopped her before she took my food out, but she had opened the door and was reaching in.

There's a sign in the room that says you have to stay in the lunchroom while using the microwave.  I didn't realize it meant I had to stand guard over my food.

Venus193

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2012, 12:21:51 AM »
Unfortunately, that's often what it means.  Think of all the discussions about food thieves we've had here.

Bluenomi

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2012, 12:44:50 AM »
We have sneeky microwaves at work, they run a cool down cycle after each use which sounds just like it does when it's running, just without the light. So people do get confused but as soon as they see food in there, they stop!

DaDancingPsych

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2012, 08:56:03 AM »
I agree that you did confront her. Escalating things by pointing out her lies would have likely made her more defensive and started a verbal war. Sadly, it probably would not have shamed her into being less selfish. I suppose the good news is that you just got a little insight to her personality that should be noted for future reference.

bopper

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2012, 09:11:11 AM »
I agree...I would not say anything further to her but stand by your microwave when you cook.

PurpleFrog

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #10 on: October 19, 2012, 10:58:52 AM »
Bet she'll look around the room before trying that trick again. OP I think you handled it well, anything more would have just become an argument.
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siamesecat2965

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #11 on: October 19, 2012, 11:01:23 AM »
She took your food out WHILE it was cooking?  That can really mess up some of those microwavable things.  That takes a lot of gal.

I stopped her before she took my food out, but she had opened the door and was reaching in.

There's a sign in the room that says you have to stay in the lunchroom while using the microwave.  I didn't realize it meant I had to stand guard over my food.

I know for me, if I went in, and the microwave was going, and someone was IN the room, I would assume it was theirs, and wait until it was finished before opening the door! She was rude.

DavidH

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2012, 11:31:11 AM »
I can understand saying you need to be in the room, in case you are one of those who can light popcorn on fire or similar things, but hovering over the machine seems rather much to expect. 

I think you were fine and she was certainly rude to try to take it out. 

Being one of those who never seems to time leftovers right, either they are still cold inside or nuclear hot, it is possible, but unlikely that she was just making conversation about 3 minutes being a long time. 

Giggity

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #13 on: October 19, 2012, 12:04:45 PM »
When I walked over there, she said "Oh, is this yours?"  and then "I didn't realize the microwave was still running, I couldn't hear it because of the sound of the vending machine."

Take her statement at face value and be helpful. "There's a timer right here. It counts down, so it shows how much time is left to cook whatever's in there."
Words mean things.

Twik

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Re: lunchroom etiquette -- would you have confronted her?
« Reply #14 on: October 19, 2012, 12:23:01 PM »
When I walked over there, she said "Oh, is this yours?"  and then "I didn't realize the microwave was still running, I couldn't hear it because of the sound of the vending machine."

Take her statement at face value and be helpful. "There's a timer right here. It counts down, so it shows how much time is left to cook whatever's in there."

And only EvilTwik would add, "And now you know, and knowing is half the battle!" in a chipper, glad-to-be-helpful tone.
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