Author Topic: "You might explain that..."  (Read 7876 times)

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Mental Magpie

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #15 on: October 25, 2012, 09:04:58 AM »
I can see looking at it in the worst possible light that it would seem rude and that he is condescending.  But given with his previous experience, I would just smirk internally and ignore.  And who knows, maybe there were some students that didn't know.  Or maybe there was a detail that was unknown to the term and the student thought they knew the entire term and turned out to learn something new after all.

Oh, I'm definitely ignoring him.  He has done so many other things that really just make me not like him (like arguing with the director of the training academy about a policy).  I just wondered what other E-Hellions thoughts about it.  I don't think he shouldn't have asked for clarification, I just think the way he did it was rude.
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bopper

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #16 on: October 25, 2012, 09:45:10 AM »
He may being a tiny bit obnoxious, but he may be pointing out things that the other students don't know and are afraid to ask.
I have been in his situation and I if I suspected that people didn't understand something I might ask "Excuse me, what does NEWT stand for?"

AnnaJ

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #17 on: October 25, 2012, 10:00:57 AM »
I'm an instructor. Based on my current student population (quite a few non-native speakers), I would probably assume that the particular phrasing was the way they had learned to ask for clarification. I'd probably answer it exactly the same way I would answer the question if it was phrased differently, say, "What's a NEWT?"

If the student asked several similar questions, I would probably offer a general reminder that students should complete the required reading before class and take notes if they had trouble with concepts or vocabulary.

Students will speak for the class for a couple of reasons:

1.) They actually know that other students are lost. This might be that a neighbor asked them for clarification. It might be that they overheard classmates trying to figure something out. It could be that students have approached them outside of class time. In some cultures, asking for clarification is frowned upon greatly. I've dealt with students from that type of culture, and I was so glad when one of my class members stayed late to tell me how lost some students were.

2.) They're embarrassed that they don't know the answer and want to make it seem like they're asking for the benefit of others. It's unfortunate, but there you go.

This.  You might be surprised how often people in a classroom don't know what a word or phrase means and simply won't ask.  They think it isn't really important or that they'll remember to ask someone after class, but it turns out to be important or they forget. 

It may be this guy has heard other student talk about not understanding things the instructor said - this doesn't mean the instructor is bad or inexperienced, it may just mean he/she missed a cue from one or more students who weren't understanding something - it happens.

Could he just be a pain?  Maybe, but those sorts tend to either challenge instructors in class or wait until a break to tell other students just how much they know.

JenJay

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #18 on: October 25, 2012, 10:19:45 AM »
I can see looking at it in the worst possible light that it would seem rude and that he is condescending.  But given with his previous experience, I would just smirk internally and ignore.  And who knows, maybe there were some students that didn't know.  Or maybe there was a detail that was unknown to the term and the student thought they knew the entire term and turned out to learn something new after all.

Oh, I'm definitely ignoring him.  He has done so many other things that really just make me not like him (like arguing with the director of the training academy about a policy).  I just wondered what other E-Hellions thoughts about it.  I don't think he shouldn't have asked for clarification, I just think the way he did it was rude.

There's always a blowhard and there's always a crusty old guy who thinks he knows how to do the job better than everyone else. Sounds like you've got yourself a two-for-one in this guy! lol

Prepare yourself that he will likely try to take you under his wing and mentor you, especially since you are a woman. You'll probably have to be pretty blunt regarding not being interested in that arrangement. You'll find that it isn't always best to follow policy, BUT, seek out someone whose opinion you trust if you are unsure. It sounds like he's headed for a rough start and you don't want to be associated with him right out of the gate.

I do think he's being rude to the instructor and he's potentially shooting himself in the foot because word will get back to the facility.

camlan

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #19 on: October 25, 2012, 10:38:06 AM »
He was born and raised in Colorado (I sat near him the first day; we talked about it).  Let me also clarify that I do not think he was rude to us but to the instructor to presume to tell him what he might or might not explain.  Now, this is just a personal opinion, but I think the reason the instructor didn't miss a beat is because he is a Corrections Officer and is used to dealing with all sorts of people; I have nothing to substantiate that, but that's what I think.  Bernie tone and facial expression were not of curiosity, I can tell you that much despite maybe not being able to directly explain it.  It wasn't so much sarcasm or snarky as it was "na-na-na-boo-boo, I already know, but just in case all you rookies don't..." without being overtly so.

He might also be trying to prove to everyone that he is above a introductory level course--that he already knows this stuff and is therefore "better" than everyone else in the class.

Where I work, we have frequent projects that necessitate hiring large numbers of temporary workers. The nature of the projects requires that the temps have college degrees. There are large numbers of retired teachers who are our "regulars." The work is related to their profession and the majority of them are wonderful.

But these days, we get a lot of laid-off teachers, as well. Some of them have a need to show that they know more about what's going on that the full-time employees of the company. They will argue about minute points, quote research and hold up entire groups of people demanding to know why they have to do something a certain way, when their way is clearly better.

Part of me feels sorry for them, because it is a blow to your self-esteem to be laid-off or fired. I can see that they are trying to show that they are not redundant, not stupid, not worthless.

But the other part of me wants to stand up and yell at them, "Look, you are working on the last two weeks of a project that has been in the making for two years. I am at least as credentialed as you, and my other team members are probably more credentialed than you are. We are not going to change something because you think there's a better way. Your 'better way' was tested and rejected a year and a half ago. Just shut up and let us get on with the work. I have a deadline to meet here!"

I content myself with indicating that the worst offenders not be hired back. Which is a shame, because there's not a lot of work available here right now, and we are the highest paying temp employer around. But we can't risk breaking the deadline of a contract because someone needs to boost their self-esteem.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Mental Magpie

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #20 on: October 29, 2012, 02:23:06 PM »
Today, Bernie actually said, "Could you explain what X is for everyone else?" He couldn't have known that others were confused because A) he was sitting at the very front of the class and B) he did not turn around or look about him. How do I know this? I was sitting 2 people back from him.  There was no murmur of confusion either.
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gramma dishes

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #21 on: October 29, 2012, 03:16:26 PM »
Today, Bernie actually said, "Could you explain what X is for everyone else?" He couldn't have known that others were confused because A) he was sitting at the very front of the class and B) he did not turn around or look about him. How do I know this? I was sitting 2 people back from him.  There was no murmur of confusion either.

And how did your instructor respond?

I think if I had been the teacher for this class I would have calmly (and slightly coldly) reminded Bernie that if the other students have questions or need explanations they are certainly capable of asking for themselves and since none had, I would be continuing the lesson now.

TootsNYC

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #22 on: October 29, 2012, 05:11:53 PM »
That's a really rude way to handle it, both of those ways.

I've been the person who knew something like that, and who suspected that some other people might not have. And I've said, "NIMA is the National Institute of Minions and Acronyms, right?"

sweetonsno

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #23 on: October 29, 2012, 05:38:47 PM »
Today, Bernie actually said, "Could you explain what X is for everyone else?" He couldn't have known that others were confused because A) he was sitting at the very front of the class and B) he did not turn around or look about him. How do I know this? I was sitting 2 people back from him.  There was no murmur of confusion either.

Okay, I'd find that obnoxious (both as an instructor and as a student). Classroom management is really up to the instructor, so unless this behavior is really interfering with your ability to learn, I wouldn't bring it up with him. Could you chime in when Mr. Knowsit asks a question on your behalf? (I'm going to borrow Toots' acronym because it's awesome.)

Knowsit: Maybe you could explain for the class what NIMA is.
Mental Magpie: (raising hand) It's the National Institute of Minions and Acronyms, right?
Instructor: Right, Magpie. Any other questions, class?

Mental Magpie

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #24 on: October 29, 2012, 08:05:11 PM »
I posted the last bit at lunch, and the instructor explained it and then went about his business.  About an hour later during another lecture with a different instructor, Bernie firmly cemented my belief that he thinks he's better/smarter/more experienced than everyone else because he used the "for everyone else" phrasing again.  This time the instructor said, "Chrons is exactly what it sounds like and what I've actually said a few times, Chronicles."  The instructor didn't sound annoyed, just kind of like, "Well I thought I made it pretty obvious but I'll explain anyway."
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LifeOnPluto

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #25 on: October 29, 2012, 10:16:30 PM »
Today, Bernie actually said, "Could you explain what X is for everyone else?" He couldn't have known that others were confused because A) he was sitting at the very front of the class and B) he did not turn around or look about him. How do I know this? I was sitting 2 people back from him.  There was no murmur of confusion either.

Okay, I'd find that obnoxious (both as an instructor and as a student). Classroom management is really up to the instructor, so unless this behavior is really interfering with your ability to learn, I wouldn't bring it up with him. Could you chime in when Mr. Knowsit asks a question on your behalf? (I'm going to borrow Toots' acronym because it's awesome.)

Knowsit: Maybe you could explain for the class what NIMA is.
Mental Magpie: (raising hand) It's the National Institute of Minions and Acronyms, right?
Instructor: Right, Magpie. Any other questions, class?

I agree with this post.

Bernie is being quite presumptuous. He's basically suggesting that the rest of the class can''t make an obvious connection (eg Chrons = Chronicles) AND that they are too timid to ask the Instructor for clarification.

I like the idea of cheerfully piping up with the right answer, next time Bernie pulls this stunt.

Mental Magpie

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #26 on: October 29, 2012, 10:19:07 PM »
Today, Bernie actually said, "Could you explain what X is for everyone else?" He couldn't have known that others were confused because A) he was sitting at the very front of the class and B) he did not turn around or look about him. How do I know this? I was sitting 2 people back from him.  There was no murmur of confusion either.

Okay, I'd find that obnoxious (both as an instructor and as a student). Classroom management is really up to the instructor, so unless this behavior is really interfering with your ability to learn, I wouldn't bring it up with him. Could you chime in when Mr. Knowsit asks a question on your behalf? (I'm going to borrow Toots' acronym because it's awesome.)

Knowsit: Maybe you could explain for the class what NIMA is.
Mental Magpie: (raising hand) It's the National Institute of Minions and Acronyms, right?
Instructor: Right, Magpie. Any other questions, class?

I agree with this post.

Bernie is being quite presumptuous. He's basically suggesting that the rest of the class can''t make an obvious connection (eg Chrons = Chronicles) AND that they are too timid to ask the Instructor for clarification.

I like the idea of cheerfully piping up with the right answer, next time Bernie pulls this stunt.

I may try that, especially if I am sitting near him again (we are encouraged to sit next to someone new each day).  It has been made obvious more than once that I am a rookie (not made in obvious in a bad way...there are just so few veterans that they're easy to track).
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

Morticia

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #27 on: October 30, 2012, 10:30:54 AM »
Are you sure he isn't "The Rest of the Class"? I would assume he was the one who didn't know these things and just didn't want to admit it.
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Mental Magpie

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #28 on: October 30, 2012, 02:02:52 PM »
Are you sure he isn't "The Rest of the Class"? I would assume he was the one who didn't know these things and just didn't want to admit it.

Other than he worked this field for 11 years, I'm pretty sure he actually knows because of the tone of superiority he uses when he says it. If he was hesitant or not confident, I would probably agree with you, but I don't hear it.
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Morticia

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Re: "You might explain that..."
« Reply #29 on: October 30, 2012, 03:17:44 PM »
Perhaps if you suggested it to him, he might stop being such a pompous fool.  >:D
Now our mom says she's changed her mind about the devil's brood, they may be evil so she thinks, but at least they're never rude...
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My travel blog: http://www.stepmonster.ca