Author Topic: Nice Restaurant Story - Child Related  (Read 4866 times)

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AnnaJ

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Re: Nice Restaurant Story - Child Related
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2012, 09:58:11 PM »
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Why did you ask to be seated somewhere else if the problem had already been handled?
Because Grandpa and the little boy were going to be coming back in at some point.  The room was not that large and because the place is a "lodge", the walls were logs and the noise echoed.

Having a party of 12 which included small children, was not going to be quiet.  We were there celebrating my boyfriend's birthday and we wanted a nice, peaceful dinner.

Maybe the little boy was perfectly behaved once the grandpa brought him back.  I did not want to take that chance though.

Makes sense. I might feel the same way if I was out with my husband.  :) Sorry, you hit a nerve.

We've had people move when we enter a dining room with our two kids ... before they even get a chance to see how they'll behave. We work very hard to be sure our kids know how to behave in restaurants, and to be immediately labeled as "a problem" irks me.

That situation, though ... I see what  you mean!

I was thinking about this tonight when I went to dinner with a friend.  We didn't go to an overly expensive place - the bill was about $80US after tax and tip for two of us - but it was a fairly laid-back place.  We had just gotten served when a family with three children came in and were seated about 15 feet from us, in a stepped-down area so that it felt more distant.

Now the children didn't misbehave - there was a very short crying spell when mom took the two older kids to the bathroom and left the little one with dad, but dad was on top of it and it didn't last long.  The children talked a little louder than adults would, and the girl had a pretty high-pitched voice, so noticeable.

The thing is that the whole atmosphere changed.  The people at the tables around us began speaking louder because the children were a little too loud, so the background noise increased.  The background music, which we had been enjoying, seemed more grating, probably because of pitch of the kids's voices.  We didn't linger over dinner and chat, which was a shame because the food was good and we had lots of stuff to catch up on.

So, here's the thing - most of the time I don't care about being seated next to children that are well-behaved, and have voluntarily taken seats on planes next to kids.  But sometimes I really want an adult atmosphere, I want to enjoy the background music and sip a glass of wine and relax and have dinner. 

It may be that is what people who move when you enter a restaurant are feeling - that even if your kids are well behaved they aren't in a kid mood - and that is perfectly OK and their right, as long as they aren't making impossible demands on the staff.  Of course, if you are going to kid oriented places, it would be silly of them to behave that way.   :)

Honey

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Re: Nice Restaurant Story - Child Related
« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2012, 10:28:42 AM »
Quote
Why did you ask to be seated somewhere else if the problem had already been handled?
Because Grandpa and the little boy were going to be coming back in at some point.  The room was not that large and because the place is a "lodge", the walls were logs and the noise echoed.

Having a party of 12 which included small children, was not going to be quiet.  We were there celebrating my boyfriend's birthday and we wanted a nice, peaceful dinner.

Maybe the little boy was perfectly behaved once the grandpa brought him back.  I did not want to take that chance though.

Makes sense. I might feel the same way if I was out with my husband.  :) Sorry, you hit a nerve.

We've had people move when we enter a dining room with our two kids ... before they even get a chance to see how they'll behave. We work very hard to be sure our kids know how to behave in restaurants, and to be immediately labeled as "a problem" irks me.

That situation, though ... I see what  you mean!

Personally, I don't like sitting near children in restaurants.  For this reason, I don't frequent chain restaurants marketed to kids and families.  As long as I don't make a scene, I don't think it's rude to ask to be moved.  Often my definition of well behaved and their parents' definition differs greatly.  Like another poster pointed out, having children nearby can really change the mood and atmosphere.  (As a side note, I don't think children should be seated in the bar area of any restaurant.  It boggles my mind when I see parents bringing young kids into the bar.)

oogyda

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Re: Nice Restaurant Story - Child Related
« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2012, 03:59:56 PM »
Was the daughter that came in with them mother of the children?  If so, she should have been the one to tell the child to get off the floor and sit nicely in the chair.  Maybe Grandma didn't say anything because she knew that the daughter wouldn't take it well if Grandma corrected the boy.   

But I was glad to hear that Grandpa took care of the situation.   :)

This was my first thought, and I couldn't figure out why everyone is laying the blame/responsibility on Grandma.  It should have been Mom.
It's not what we gather along the way that matters.  It's what we scatter.

snowdragon

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Re: Nice Restaurant Story - Child Related
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2012, 01:12:13 AM »
Quote
Why did you ask to be seated somewhere else if the problem had already been handled?
Because Grandpa and the little boy were going to be coming back in at some point.  The room was not that large and because the place is a "lodge", the walls were logs and the noise echoed.

Having a party of 12 which included small children, was not going to be quiet.  We were there celebrating my boyfriend's birthday and we wanted a nice, peaceful dinner.

Maybe the little boy was perfectly behaved once the grandpa brought him back.  I did not want to take that chance though.

Makes sense. I might feel the same way if I was out with my husband.  :) Sorry, you hit a nerve.

We've had people move when we enter a dining room with our two kids ... before they even get a chance to see how they'll behave. We work very hard to be sure our kids know how to behave in restaurants, and to be immediately labeled as "a problem" irks me.

That situation, though ... I see what  you mean!

Personally, I don't like sitting near children in restaurants.  For this reason, I don't frequent chain restaurants marketed to kids and families.  As long as I don't make a scene, I don't think it's rude to ask to be moved.  Often my definition of well behaved and their parents' definition differs greatly.  Like another poster pointed out, having children nearby can really change the mood and atmosphere.  (As a side note, I don't think children should be seated in the bar area of any restaurant.  It boggles my mind when I see parents bringing young kids into the bar.)

  If people wait to see how the kids behave and then ask to be moved....the disturbance has happened and the dinner disrupted. If they move before it happens there is less of a chance of that disruption being so bad.  Why should someone who is going to be disturbed by misbehave also have to have their dinner disrupted by moving after it happened, some times it's just easier to move before rather than after.
  I agree with the PP that if one does not make a scene it's not rude to ask to be moved.