Author Topic: Snarky assumptions about aging  (Read 4392 times)

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siamesecat2965

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Re: Snarky assumptions about aging
« Reply #30 on: November 09, 2012, 11:02:19 AM »
And just to add this - I've known people with very high cholesterol, who eat healthy, exercise, and are not overweight. In other words they "take good care" of themselves.  Yet there are many health problems associated with high cholesterol, and its also hereditary.

My father, on the other hand, was overweight most of his life, smoked like a fiend, had hypertension, yet HIS cholesterol was about 145, which is well within the healthy range.  He died from cancer, perhaps related to some of his other health issues, perhaps not.  I too am overweight, medically speaking, obese, yet my cholesterol is in the 150 range, and so far, I have no weight-related health issues, other than cranky creaky knees.

magicdomino

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Re: Snarky assumptions about aging
« Reply #31 on: November 09, 2012, 11:10:10 AM »
Someone who I know to be about 50 years old, retorted,

"I eat a healthy diet, walk every where, and do not use prescription medications; therefore, I plan on being able to use stairs, walk on hilly ground, and drive my car well into old age."


He/She/It better stay away from those stairs.  One bad fall, and he/she/it will be very interested in accessible buildings and public transportation.  As I told the architect when my addition was built, you don't have to be old to slip on the soap.  Even if you manage to avoid spinal injuries from whatever cause, old age is going to get you.   Good habits and great genes will keep you running, but you can't hide.

I think it helps to really know someone who is having problems.  I've looked at my non-accessible house in a different light since my mother first developed severe arthritis in her hands, then much later when we discovered that neither the bathroom nor any of the bedrooms are wheelchair-accessible. 

Luci

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Re: Snarky assumptions about aging
« Reply #32 on: November 09, 2012, 11:15:32 AM »
And old age comes on so suddenly!

We can sit around smugly looking and acting the same, living the same way, for 30 years, then BAM!, in 2 years we are old.  I remember how shocked I was when on day both my mother-in-law and my dad were old. Both were farm raised and worked and otherwise active, and both lived into their 90s, but about the age 85, they each turned old.

What I am saying is that even at 70, it's not wise to dismiss everyone in worse health than we are. It can happen quickly and surprisingly. It's not just the generation X kids  :) who make comments like that. Baby Boomers often go that way and soon understand.

The old joke about thinking I'm dead because I woke up one morning and nothing hurt is oh, so true. And with good luck, that stage comes to everyone!


oogyda

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Re: Snarky assumptions about aging
« Reply #33 on: November 09, 2012, 11:18:05 AM »
I agree with the general consenus being expressed and won't add to that.

I will add to the OP that these people are completly ignoring what communities need right now.  Even if their perfect solution were to be proven correct and take effect immediately, there is still a large number of the population who does need, or will need, the amenities and services talked about. 

So, what would they do?  Say "Well, you did it to yourself so deal with it yourself."?
It's not what we gather along the way that matters.  It's what we scatter.

Jones

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Re: Snarky assumptions about aging
« Reply #34 on: November 09, 2012, 11:37:56 AM »
And old age comes on so suddenly!

We can sit around smugly looking and acting the same, living the same way, for 30 years, then BAM!, in 2 years we are old.  I remember how shocked I was when on day both my mother-in-law and my dad were old. Both were farm raised and worked and otherwise active, and both lived into their 90s, but about the age 85, they each turned old.
*snipped*

Heh, you made me think of someone I met through NaNoWriMo this year; she said (as her biography) that she spent most of her life waiting to be old enough to drive, then once she could she waited about 30 seconds and discovered she was over 60.