General Etiquette > All In A Day's Work

You Are Responsible for Your Own Registration

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BeagleMommy:
My university installed a new computer system for registering for classes.  It's been problematic.  Students and employees are given differing types of access in the system.  I can look up a student's transcripts but cannot access the registration part of the system.  Only matriculated students have access to it.  Today, I received a call from one of our graduate students telling me she was having trouble using the system.  I ran through some of the issues other students have been having when she finally signed and said "Would you just please do it for me?".

Me:  I'm sorry.  I don't have access to the registration system.  Have you tried using a different computer?  Sometimes firewalls block you from using a work computer.

Student:  I've tried that.  Can't you register me?

Me:  No, I can't.  I have directions for using the system.  If you'd like to log onto our website I can walk you through the process or I can email you the directions.

Student:  No, I don't have time for that.  You should be able to register me.

Me:  Well, even on the old system we were unable to access student accounts to register people.  The other option is to fill out a paper registration form.  I can send you one via email and you can fill it out and fax it back.

Student:  (sighing heavily) Fine!

After that she hung up without saying good-bye.  Most students who call with issues are usually very polite and grateful that I can help.  I just figured an almost 30-year-old, masters-level student wouldn't expect the department secretary to do the work for them.  Guess I was wrong.

Surianne:
She was rude in the way she handled it and displaying her lack of patience with you, but I don't think the request was that odd.  Perhaps at her previous school (since she's a grad student, it's likely she went somewhere else for undergrad) if you weren't able to register, the secretaries could help you, and it may have been part of their job to help the students if they couldn't get the registration system to work.  That was the case at my school. 

WillyNilly:

--- Quote from: BeagleMommy on November 07, 2012, 02:07:32 PM ---I just figured an almost 30-year-old, masters-level student wouldn't expect the department secretary to do the work for them.  Guess I was wrong.

--- End quote ---

Honestly?  Perhaps her very very closing bit was rude but I think you have it all wrong.  You are in a service position.  Students are customers of your employer.  They are paying for their education - without them your employer would not even exist.  They deserve a certain level of customer service.

She did apparently try several methods of doing this herself, she didn't just call you up right off the bat and demand you do her work for her.  But you (not you personally, but your employer who were representing) were unable to provide her with the service which she paid for and to which she is therefore entitled.  I think she had every right to be extremely annoyed and expectant of someone doing more then just telling her this was her problem to resolve.  I think you should have expedited her issue in some way - gotten her to higher up, gotten her some sort of reassurances that the problem was on the school's end (since you mention this system has been problematic) and she would not be penalized (closed out of classes, etc) and generally just not pushed this issue back on her.

Yvaine:

--- Quote from: WillyNilly on November 07, 2012, 02:29:56 PM ---
--- Quote from: BeagleMommy on November 07, 2012, 02:07:32 PM ---I just figured an almost 30-year-old, masters-level student wouldn't expect the department secretary to do the work for them.  Guess I was wrong.

--- End quote ---

Honestly?  Perhaps her very very closing bit was rude but I think you have it all wrong.  You are in a service position.  Students are customers of your employer.  They are paying for their education - without them your employer would not even exist.  They deserve a certain level of customer service.

She did apparently try several methods of doing this herself, she didn't just call you up right off the bat and demand you do her work for her.  But you (not you personally, but your employer who were representing) were unable to provide her with the service which she paid for and to which she is therefore entitled.  I think she had every right to be extremely annoyed and expectant of someone doing more then just telling her this was her problem to resolve.  I think you should have expedited her issue in some way - gotten her to higher up, gotten her some sort of reassurances that the problem was on the school's end (since you mention this system has been problematic) and she would not be penalized (closed out of classes, etc) and generally just not pushed this issue back on her.

--- End quote ---

I disagree. The OP doesn't even have access to that part of the system, and she offered to walk the student through it but the student refused. The school as a whole is there to serve its students, yes, but this particular part of serving the students isn't actually the OP's job, and she was going to go above and beyond her job for this person.

The student wasn't wrong, necessarily, to assume the OP could do it, especially if it was different at a previous school she attended, but the student was rude after she found out the OP did not have access.

WillyNilly:

--- Quote from: Yvaine on November 07, 2012, 02:33:56 PM ---
--- Quote from: WillyNilly on November 07, 2012, 02:29:56 PM ---
--- Quote from: BeagleMommy on November 07, 2012, 02:07:32 PM ---I just figured an almost 30-year-old, masters-level student wouldn't expect the department secretary to do the work for them.  Guess I was wrong.

--- End quote ---

Honestly?  Perhaps her very very closing bit was rude but I think you have it all wrong.  You are in a service position.  Students are customers of your employer.  They are paying for their education - without them your employer would not even exist.  They deserve a certain level of customer service.

She did apparently try several methods of doing this herself, she didn't just call you up right off the bat and demand you do her work for her.  But you (not you personally, but your employer who were representing) were unable to provide her with the service which she paid for and to which she is therefore entitled.  I think she had every right to be extremely annoyed and expectant of someone doing more then just telling her this was her problem to resolve.  I think you should have expedited her issue in some way - gotten her to higher up, gotten her some sort of reassurances that the problem was on the school's end (since you mention this system has been problematic) and she would not be penalized (closed out of classes, etc) and generally just not pushed this issue back on her.

--- End quote ---

I disagree. The OP doesn't even have access to that part of the system, and she offered to walk the student through it but the student refused. The school as a whole is there to serve its students, yes, but this particular part of serving the students isn't actually the OP's job, and she was going to go above and beyond her job for this person.

The student wasn't wrong, necessarily, to assume the OP could do it, especially if it was different at a previous school she attended, but the student was rude after she found out the OP did not have access.

--- End quote ---

Well that's why I said I think OP should have sent the caller to someone who could help her, or done something to alleviate the student's stress over not being having the time then to register.  I understand the OP couldn't register the student, but the OP is written like this all the student's problem to deal with.  And I don't think it should be.

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