Author Topic: Getting a "raise"  (Read 7293 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

michelle73

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9
Getting a "raise"
« on: November 09, 2012, 03:53:22 AM »
I don't know if this fits here but here goes.

I got a raise yesterday. I was recently given a promotion and my responsibilities have increased. I work for one of the big three automotive companies not a small business. My raise...$100 a month more.

I know I should be grateful but to be honest I find it rather insulting. I work hard and am always willing to work more hours to help out. Ive even come in on my days off and worked and we don't get paid OT. We are on salary so it doesn't matter if you work 80 hours or 100 hours the checks are always the same.

Anyway do I say anything, come across as ungrateful and take a chance at pissing off the boss? Do I keep it to myself? Advice please!

Phoebelion

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 287
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2012, 05:50:34 AM »
Is there any way you can guesstimate what your predecesor was getting?  I would find it hard to believe that that person was making only $100 more per moth.  And did that person quit (maybe because of the money or lack thereof) or did tey also get a promotion? 

Or maybe approach the boss to inquire if the $100 is a typo?  When he asks why, just say you were under the impression that the inreased responsibilities warrented a more  significant raise in wage. 

Of course, this advise is coming from the person who returned a $25 Christmas bonus (company had 5 employees at the time) after being there 14 months becasue "the company obviously needed the money more than I did". 

michelle73

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2012, 06:08:30 AM »
Yes its absolutely $100 a month because my manager took me into an office and closed the door to tell me so nobody would overhear the announcement. I'm surprised balloons didn't drop from the ceiling LOL!

Nobody was fired but I was given the job because they are trying to make improvements to the front line and want a more experienced person then what was in the position before. They want someone who can do the job the way they want it done and the way it should and needs to be done.

I am seriously considering telling them to just keep it. All its going to do is put me in a higher tax bracket and $100 bucks isn't worth that to me.

Just Lori

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4433
  • USA
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2012, 07:00:33 AM »
Would you be open to other benefits, such as an increased vacation schedule or some sort of stock option?  A company car? ;)

You probably know this, but oftentimes managers are given a lump sum that they must distribute among employees.  Your manager's hands may be tied on the financial end, but there also may be other benefits available.

I'd definitely use the tax burden increase in your argument.  At the very least, I'd talk to a good financial advisor about options to keep your tax rate from increasing while still taking advantage of the money.  Also, check your health benefits cost.  If that cost is going up, the raise may cancel out.

Good luck.  I know we can all spout platitudes about how we're lucky to have the jobs we have, and we all know people who haven't seen a raise in years, but those don't take away from the uncomfortable situation you are in.

LB

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2519
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2012, 07:44:15 AM »
I don't know your industry or your job, so I don't know what's fair. If your raise is truly unfair or less than you deserve, you should talk to your boss.

But, don't go in with a hostile tone. You won't get anywhere that way. Tell your boss you were surprised at the amount and how much you were expecting. Tel him/her WHY you were expecting that much (detail your responsibilities, extra work you are doing, how your position has changed). And then ask why the amount was not what you expected. Ask respectfully.

Is your company non-profit? Have there been budget concerns?

CookieChica

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 331
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2012, 09:04:11 AM »
There are lots of unknown factors here (current salary, length of service, etc). I can tell you that a $1200 raise is not unheard of. Usually, HR is thinking in percentage for raise, not total dollars.

I suggest you approach your boss with a counteroffer and reasons why you are worth it.

lady_disdain

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5890
    • Contemporary Jewelry
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2012, 09:18:22 AM »
When are the annual budgets done? Your manager may not be able to give you a raise right now because of this year's budget but he may be able to negotiate an amount for next year. But you have to get his promise now, otherwise, other priorities may take precedence. It may be a lot easier to negotiate a future raise.

Also, most large companies have a sliding scale for salary in each position, with a lower value for an inexperienced person in that function, a mid point salary and a top end (by the way, it is a very bad sign to reach the top salary for a function). HR should be able to tell you where you are in the scale (this is supposed to be shared with the employee, generally). If the scales from different functions overlap, someone can be in your situation: moving from the top end of a scale to the lower end of the new one results in little difference if the system is not well designed or if the promotion was an unusual one.

Slartibartfast

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11769
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2012, 09:34:36 AM »
I think it depends a lot on how much you already make.  If you're making $7/hour now, that's a 10% raise.  If you make $35/hour, it's a 2% raise.  If the additional duties to your job constitute a higher percentage of your job than the raise makes - and you aren't getting to pass off some of your previous duties to someone else - then you definitely have grounds to argue for more compensation.  I agree there's probably no point in asking for more money, but you can definitely ask for more vacation/sick days or other benefits.

EmmaJ.

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1417
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2012, 09:44:31 AM »
<snip>
Of course, this advise is coming from the person who returned a $25 Christmas bonus (company had 5 employees at the time) after being there 14 months becasue "the company obviously needed the money more than I did".

Sorry for being obtuse, but I'm very puzzled.  Why would you return a cash Christmas gift?

Slartibartfast

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11769
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2012, 09:49:11 AM »
<snip>
Of course, this advise is coming from the person who returned a $25 Christmas bonus (company had 5 employees at the time) after being there 14 months becasue "the company obviously needed the money more than I did".

Sorry for being obtuse, but I'm very puzzled.  Why would you return a cash Christmas gift?

I'm not Phoebelion, but I'd guess she returned it because $25 was insultingly low considering how few employees there were and what I assume was the financial state of the company.

audrey1962

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4322
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2012, 09:55:06 AM »
I live in metro Detroit and am very familiar with the auto industry. IMO, this is quite generous - it's an additional $1,200/year. What exactly are you upset about? Why do you find it insulting?

Also, you may want to look into tax brackets and how they work. I don't want to provide more detail as it may be outside the purview of the forum, but there are some great websites that explain it.

lady_disdain

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5890
    • Contemporary Jewelry
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2012, 10:03:46 AM »
I live in metro Detroit and am very familiar with the auto industry. IMO, this is quite generous - it's an additional $1,200/year. What exactly are you upset about? Why do you find it insulting?

Also, you may want to look into tax brackets and how they work. I don't want to provide more detail as it may be outside the purview of the forum, but there are some great websites that explain it.

It really depends on how much the OP makes in a year. If she is earning $36,000, that is 3% (very little over inflation, which would lead me to question if her new duties are worth so little to the company). If she is earning $48,000, then it is below inflation, which would mean that she is not get a raise at all for her new duties. If she is earning $12,000, then, yes, an extra $1,200 is great.

Honestly, for  promotion, I would expect a real raise or an explanation of why not.

Sharnita

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 21525
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2012, 10:04:50 AM »
There are a wbole lot of people wbo worked for the big three or in towns suppoting the big three who are suffering mightily. $100 a month might be about 10% of their unemployment, if they dtill qualify. A lot of those people have been loyal to their company and the industry just hasn't sustained them. They would be happy to be insulted that way. Same withe retirees who had their benefits changed ex post facto. If you complain or decline it will appear petty and frankly geedy with a side of unrealistic.

LB

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2519
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2012, 10:12:28 AM »
Oops., ignore my non profit question. I obviously missed some information.

audrey1962

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4322
Re: Getting a "raise"
« Reply #14 on: November 09, 2012, 10:15:33 AM »
I live in metro Detroit and am very familiar with the auto industry. IMO, this is quite generous - it's an additional $1,200/year. What exactly are you upset about? Why do you find it insulting?

Also, you may want to look into tax brackets and how they work. I don't want to provide more detail as it may be outside the purview of the forum, but there are some great websites that explain it.

It really depends on how much the OP makes in a year. If she is earning $36,000, that is 3% (very little over inflation, which would lead me to question if her new duties are worth so little to the company). If she is earning $48,000, then it is below inflation, which would mean that she is not get a raise at all for her new duties. If she is earning $12,000, then, yes, an extra $1,200 is great.

Honestly, for  promotion, I would expect a real raise or an explanation of why not.

That's all true, except companies are not required to give promotions or raises, regardless of whether or not you take on new duties, nor are they required to keep pace with inflation (and at this point I will stop as I do not want to veer into legal territory).

Again, I do not understand why this is insulting. They are not required to offer a raise and the OP is free to find employment elsewhere.

[Edited to correct grammar]
« Last Edit: November 09, 2012, 10:21:10 AM by audrey1962 »