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What does 'Holiday/s' mean?

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Yvaine:

--- Quote from: camlan on November 15, 2012, 06:25:42 AM ---However, having several days off work, when you might go somewhere else, is a "vacation." Most jobs allow employees two weeks of vacation a year, sometimes more the longer you work there. When school lets out for the summer, it's "summer vacation." There's a short gap for schools, usually a week, when they are closed for Christmas and New Year's. When I was a kid, that was Christmas vacation. Now it is usually called "winter vacation" or something similar.

--- End quote ---

Yup, and then "break" is another word that is sometimes used when it's from school--spring break, Thanksgiving break, winter break.

WillyNilly:

--- Quote from: camlan on November 15, 2012, 06:25:42 AM ---Holiday in the US can have a couple of meanings.

In general, "the holidays" is the time between Thanksgiving at the end of November to New Year's Day.

"Have a happy holiday!" or "Happy Holidays!" are generic greetings/sayings when you don't know what religious holiday someone celebrates, Christmas or Hanukkah or the Winter Solstice or nothing at all. Most people in the US celebrate Thanksgiving and New Years, so it tends to fit a variety of people without offending.

"Tomorrow is a holiday," usually refers to a day off from work, one of the scheduled Federal holidays, such as Christmas or Labor Day or the Fourth of July.

However, having several days off work, when you might go somewhere else, is a "vacation." Most jobs allow employees two weeks of vacation a year, sometimes more the longer you work there. When school lets out for the summer, it's "summer vacation." There's a short gap for schools, usually a week, when they are closed for Christmas and New Year's. When I was a kid, that was Christmas vacation. Now it is usually called "winter vacation" or something similar.

--- End quote ---

This ^

In general people in the US don't "go on holiday" or have a "summer holiday" from school - that's "vacation".  A holiday is a specific date (Christmas, 4th of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving), when plural its usually referring to close together specific dates - Thanksgiving/Christmas/Chanukah/New Years are often squished into being called "holidays" as one solid group ("what are you doing for the holidays?" "happy holidays" "holiday meal planning" etc).  It can also mean Easter/Passover ("any holiday plans for the weekend?") when speaking to someone who's religion you aren't familiar with.

We do have minor holidays, like Presidents Day, and major ones like Memorial Day and some are Federal holidays (Veteran's Day) where really only government (local or national) employees get a day off of work versus everyone holidays (New Years Day) where just about everyone except 'can't take off' jobs (hospital staff, police, etc) get a day off.

QueenfaninCA:
The meaning depends on which side of the pond you live:

In British English holiday means not working or actually traveling. In American English that's called vacation.

In American English holiday means days like Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Luci:
Central US. 'Holidays' means Thanksgiving thru Jan2.
 
'Holiday' means like a Federal Holiday with or without days of work off: all the usual ones plus Flag Day, Valentine Day, Columbus Day - not your birthday, type stuff.

I love that I finally figured out in my British-authored novels that 'Holiday' means 'Vacation'. That took even longer than 'jumper' for pullover sweater.

Yvaine:

--- Quote from: Luci45 on November 15, 2012, 01:30:13 PM ---Central US. 'Holidays' means Thanksgiving thru Jan2.
 
'Holiday' means like a Federal Holiday with or without days of work off: all the usual ones plus Flag Day, Valentine Day, Columbus Day - not your birthday, type stuff.

I love that I finally figured out in my British-authored novels that 'Holiday' means 'Vacation'. That took even longer than 'jumper' for pullover sweater.

--- End quote ---

And Ron Weasley threatening to "go starkers" rather than wear his hideous dress robes meant he'd go naked, not that he'd go crazy.  ;D

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