General Etiquette > All In A Day's Work

Anti-retirement gift

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Coley:
This is such a sad situation. DH and I are employed by the same organization. A sweet woman who has a very long history at our organization is being forced out of her job. She is of retirement age; however, she has not expressed a desire to retire. The upper management evidently decided that she was no longer of use in her position. They offered her the option of taking a lower-level position in another department or retiring. She opted for retirement.

Typically, the organization holds parties for employees who are retiring. DH and I have learned that this lady has requested that they not hold a party for her. I don't blame her for that. This wasn't her choice, and celebrating it doesn't seem right. Although the management's decision is not common knowledge, those of who know about it are feeling pretty sick that she has been treated this way.

DH and I are wondering if there is anything the two of us could do to wish her well and honor her longevity and commitment to the organization. Any ideas? Since she does not want a party, should we forgo any acknowledgement of her departure?

CreteGirl:
Perhaps take her out for a special lunch or dinner.

Amara:
That is awful. I second CreteGirl's suggestion of a special lunch or dinner (maybe dinner, no time restraints?) and invite whoever feels like you two do to share in it. She would probably appreciate knowing that some there are going to miss her.

LEMon:
I would see the difference as she has asked the company not to do this.  You as her friends can ask to do something and have the heartfelt meaning come through to her.

cicero:

--- Quote from: Coley on November 19, 2012, 05:22:35 PM ---
DH and I are wondering if there is anything the two of us could do to wish her well and honor her longevity and commitment to the organization. Any ideas? Since she does not want a party, should we forgo any acknowledgement of her departure?

--- End quote ---
does she not want *any* party/acknowledgement or does she not want a *company* party?

some people really truly don't want any parties or acknowledgements. but if she just doesn't want a company party, then I would do as PPs suggested - take her out to lunch, have a little party with her work friends, bring in a cake on her last day and make it more a casual event, and so on.

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