Etiquette School is in session! > Complete Silence

I know I should have said something but just couldn't find the words

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Emmy:
There are just some thing so bizarre there is just nothing to say.  Also, by not saying anything, it probably ended the conversation sooner.  If you had interjected said something about not being family, X would have argued your point.  If they come knocking at your door again, just pretend you aren't home.

Danika:
I wouldn't have been able to think of anything to say to that either. The whole situation is so bizarre that I think the EHell advice of "don't engage the crazy" would be applicable here. Silence was best because you didn't need to waste your time or drive yourself nuts trying to have a discussion.


--- Quote from: Emmy on November 30, 2012, 01:15:55 PM ---...If they come knocking at your door again, just pretend you aren't home.

--- End quote ---

I agree. That's another good example of when to use complete silence. Just stay on your couch and don't even open the door.

gramma dishes:
I don't know how the rest of you live, but here in this house, even family has to ask permission before they take treats.  My children did and my grandchildren do now. 

This girl was no more your "family" than I am.  In fact, in all likelihood we've shared more words between us than you have with this child.  But even if you had been over the moon excited to see her (meet her?) that still doesn't give her carte blanche on your candy dish!  We would not allow our own family members to do it in their very own house where they lived.  You just don't DO that in someone else's house.

Your silence was eloquent and golden.

Piratelvr1121:
I've known people who say that after you've been to their house enough times, if you're a friend or family, you just help yourself to whatever you want.  People have gotten quite irritated with me in the past when I've been at their house for the 20th time and still said "It's cool if I have a soda?"

I am just really uncomfortable raiding someone else's pantry or fridge.   When I'd babysit as a teen, some parents would just set out what I was alright to eat, others would just say "eat whatever" but I'd just stand there at the pantry thinking "What if they're saving that? Or that? What if that has a purpose like the kid's lunches?"  I liked when people left out the "okay" items better.

But I guess these people are of the latter sort who just believe it's a free for all if you're related and you shouldn't have to ask.

Yvaine:
I think the most boggling thing is that she was the one who admonished the kid to ask, and then she tried to make it sound like you were some kind of ogre who was trying to deny candy to her!  :o

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