General Etiquette > All In A Day's Work

When a Boss doesn’t accept your expertise…Final Update #19

(1/5) > >>

DollyPond:
Dear E-Hellions,

I have a work situation where I need some outside perspective.  I work in a lab where I design new testing.  I have done this for over 10 years and have successfully introduced over 35 new tests for our lab.  One new test that I developed is almost ready to be implemented. 

The problem is we have a new interim director (former director suffered a tragedy) who is not very knowledgeable about test design.  She is asking for a lot of extra work to be done mainly to address a situation that might rarely, if ever, arise.  Mind you, this is not something that does happen regularly, it is not occurring now, nor has it ever happened in the past.  She is imagining an extremely remote possibility that, even if it does occur, would only adversely affect a small number of samples that could easily have repeat testing done.

This extra work will significantly delay bringing this test into the lab – by at least a month or two and will have direct financial effects.  No amount of rational explanation has deterred her from demanding that this work be done.  My Supervisor and I have tried to tell her that the extra work is not needed and that if the problem arises during the actual live runs of the test we will deal with it then.

Just yesterday, she went behind Supervisor’s back and asked a lab tech to do the extra work for her.  Supervisor is not yet aware of this and I am in a quandary as to whether to tell Supervisor or just let the chips fall where they may when Supervisor does find out.  So far I have feigned ignorance of the situation.

What say you?  I am of the opinion of stepping back and letting the train go off the cliff as it may be the only way interim director will stop trying to micromanage the situation.

Shoo:
Yup, just let the chips fall. 

MummySweet:

--- Quote from: DollyPond on December 01, 2012, 12:19:23 PM --- I am of the opinion of stepping back and letting the train go off the cliff as it may be the only way interim director will stop trying to micromanage the situation.

--- End quote ---

This, with the caveat that you document the situation and the advice that you have given so that you can cover yourself if/when the time comes that someone is looking for a scapegoat.

Deetee:
As long as you found out through normal channels and are sure of what happened, I think you should tell your supervisor.

DollyPond:

--- Quote from: Deetee on December 01, 2012, 01:20:10 PM ---As long as you found out through normal channels and are sure of what happened, I think you should tell your supervisor.

--- End quote ---

The lab tech came and told me the specifics of what the director asked her to do.  She has not told Supervisor but may need to to explain what she's working on.

Just an example of the ridiculousness of this request: 
It would be like someone telling you that you needed to reinforce your entire roof in case a meteor fell from the sky and knocked off a few shingles. Could it happen?  Yes.  But the chances of it actually happening are very remote.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version