Author Topic: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.  (Read 13206 times)

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marcel

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #90 on: March 21, 2013, 04:24:35 AM »
For the following you have to know that beer is spelled "bier"in Dutch.

In the north of the country, there is a small village called "sexbierum"
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Last_Dance

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #91 on: April 22, 2013, 10:09:39 AM »
In Northern Italy there's a river called "Member." Consequently, there are several towns known as "X on the Member."

One of such towns is called "Vergate" (Cane blows). 
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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #92 on: April 22, 2013, 10:30:24 AM »
When we lived off base in Oceanside, Ca, we lived on a street named Calle Las Positas.  Once I was told that Positas meant raisins, all I could see were the California Raisins dancing down our street outside the complex gate.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

cabbageweevil

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #93 on: April 22, 2013, 02:59:41 PM »
Austria seems to be rich in communities whose names are comical to English-speakers.

There are Windpassing, Rottenegg, Rottenmann, Mutters, and Natters.

And just on the Austrian side of the border with Germany, there is the village with the name which is the English vulgar two-syllable word (think rhymingly, broncos) for what eHell calls "playing scrabble".  I understand that the local council wishes to change the village's name, just because it's such a pain that English-speaking visitors keep stealing as trophies, the "You are entering [village name]" signs.

There's a town in Austria which rather amuses me -- name "Bad Hall": a personal thing here, my surname being Hall.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #94 on: April 22, 2013, 03:12:13 PM »

The village of Piddle in Worcestershire was the first one I thought of.  Most amusingly a local brewery markets a beer called "Piddle in the Hole" after that village. 

Other amusing ones are Upper Slaughter and Lower Slaughter in Gloucestershire.  Interestingly despite the name, Upper Slaughter is one of the few places that had no combat fatalities in either world war.  Given the death rates in WW1 in particular that's pretty unusual.

Late on this one, but have just seen it -- context WW1 (WW2 was overall less lethal re the countries concerned) -- I understand that there are in all of Great Britain, just a couple of dozen villages, all of the men from which who went to the First World War, survived it. They are known as "Thankful villages", or "Luck parishes".

France suffered considerably worse losses in WW1, than did Britain: I have read that there is just one village in all of France, whose menfolk all survived that war.

reflection5

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #95 on: April 22, 2013, 03:17:38 PM »
Tallahatchie Bridge in Mississippi (the one Billy Joe jumped off)

Bottlecaps

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #96 on: April 23, 2013, 01:15:22 AM »
Wedowee, Alabama. Now, it's not funny if you pronounce it correctly, but if you pronounce it the way I pronounced it the first time I saw the word shortly after coming down here, it's pretty hilarious.

How it's actually pronounced: Weh-dow-wee
How I pronounced it: Weed-oh-wee.

Mr. Bottlecaps sure got a kick out of that!
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Melle

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #97 on: April 23, 2013, 10:01:39 AM »
And just on the Austrian side of the border with Germany, there is the village with the name which is the English vulgar two-syllable word (think rhymingly, broncos) for what eHell calls "playing scrabble".  I understand that the local council wishes to change the village's name, just because it's such a pain that English-speaking visitors keep stealing as trophies, the "You are entering [village name]" signs.

And, not very far from there, on the German side: "Petting".
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Outdoor Girl

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #98 on: April 23, 2013, 10:05:08 AM »
And just on the Austrian side of the border with Germany, there is the village with the name which is the English vulgar two-syllable word (think rhymingly, broncos) for what eHell calls "playing scrabble".  I understand that the local council wishes to change the village's name, just because it's such a pain that English-speaking visitors keep stealing as trophies, the "You are entering [village name]" signs.

A girl I work with went to this village solely because of the name.  She took a picture with the sign, though, not the whole dang sign.
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ClaireC79

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #99 on: April 23, 2013, 05:29:09 PM »

Interestingly despite the name, Upper Slaughter is one of the few places that had no combat fatalities in either world war.  Given the death rates in WW1 in particular that's pretty unusual.

Late on this one, but have just seen it -- context WW1 (WW2 was overall less lethal re the countries concerned) -- I understand that there are in all of Great Britain, just a couple of dozen villages, all of the men from which who went to the First World War, survived it. They are known as "Thankful villages", or "Luck parishes".

France suffered considerably worse losses in WW1, than did Britain: I have read that there is just one village in all of France, whose menfolk all survived that war.

52 from WW1 (originally thought to be 32), 14 doubly thankful villages - my great grandmother was from one.  Upper Slaughter is another doubly thankful

They are the only villages in the UK without cenotaphs

snowdragon

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #100 on: April 23, 2013, 09:36:07 PM »
There is a town near near here called Ball's Falls.



Thipu1

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #101 on: April 24, 2013, 10:39:39 AM »
I may have mentioned this before but a place near NYC is known as the 'Outerbridge Crossing'. 

It's just a bridge but, since it was named after a Mr. Outerbridge, it seemed silly to call it the Outerbridge Bridge. 

Hmmmmm

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #102 on: April 24, 2013, 12:41:30 PM »
This isn't a funny name but something DD and I were discussing this weekend. I'm a native Texans and I grew up pronouncing the Rio Grande without the "day" on the end of Grande. Though we knew the correct Spanish pronounciation, no one ever used it. But now it is common to hear Rio Grande with the "day" and according to DD is how it is referred to in school. DD thought it funny that my generation and prio ones used the Spanish word for river but combined it with an English pronounciation of grand.

Do other people have instances of mixing language pronounciation in names?

Danika

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #103 on: April 24, 2013, 12:52:47 PM »
This isn't a funny name but something DD and I were discussing this weekend. I'm a native Texans and I grew up pronouncing the Rio Grande without the "day" on the end of Grande. Though we knew the correct Spanish pronounciation, no one ever used it. But now it is common to hear Rio Grande with the "day" and according to DD is how it is referred to in school. DD thought it funny that my generation and prio ones used the Spanish word for river but combined it with an English pronounciation of grand.

Do other people have instances of mixing language pronounciation in names?

There's a city in Colorado called Buena Vista. Which, I believe should be prounounced "Bwayna Veesta" but instead it's called/pronounced "Byou na Vista." For that matter, people native to Colorado pronounce the state "Ka la rad oh" where "rad" rhymes with "dad." And Nevada is pronounced "Neh vad uh" where "vad" rhymes with "dad." When we hear people say "Ne vah duh" we know they're from the East Coast.

Melle

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Re: Place Names That Sound Funny to Others.
« Reply #104 on: April 24, 2013, 12:58:16 PM »
You don't even want to know how my English teacher pronounced Arkansas ;)