Poll

If you were fairly new to a position, would you ask for time off after your supervisor requested that you work over the holidays?  

Yes, I would ask for the time off
No, I would not request time off if I was previously asked to work during that time

Author Topic: Asking for time off during the holidays  (Read 15898 times)

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onyonryngs

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #30 on: December 10, 2012, 10:47:04 AM »
I figure it never hurts to make the request as long as you do so according to company guidelines (i.e. asking early enough) and as long as you are okay with being told "no."

I disagree as the manager already asked her to work and she's basically on probation and hoping the temp position becomes permanent.  Sometimes the asking does hurt.  It gives the impression that your job is not your priority as you asked for time off knowing that your presence has been requested/is needed.  Definitely wouldn't ask in this scenario.

CaptainObvious

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #31 on: December 10, 2012, 11:21:30 AM »
I figure it never hurts to make the request as long as you do so according to company guidelines (i.e. asking early enough) and as long as you are okay with being told "no."

I disagree as the manager already asked her to work and she's basically on probation and hoping the temp position becomes permanent.  Sometimes the asking does hurt.  It gives the impression that your job is not your priority as you asked for time off knowing that your presence has been requested/is needed.  Definitely wouldn't ask in this scenario.

Agreed, there are times where it most certainly does hurt to ask, and this is one of them.

Yvaine

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #32 on: December 10, 2012, 11:29:08 AM »
I figure it never hurts to make the request as long as you do so according to company guidelines (i.e. asking early enough) and as long as you are okay with being told "no."

I disagree as the manager already asked her to work and she's basically on probation and hoping the temp position becomes permanent.  Sometimes the asking does hurt.  It gives the impression that your job is not your priority as you asked for time off knowing that your presence has been requested/is needed.  Definitely wouldn't ask in this scenario.

Agreed, there are times where it most certainly does hurt to ask, and this is one of them.

Yup, this. Some years ago I had to pass up the chance to go on a fun trip with friends because it was right at our office's busiest time (not the Christmas holiday in our case, but an annual spring event). One friend nagged me continually that it couldn't hurt to ask, and I argued that it would absolutely hurt to ask. No matter whether the answer was yes or no, I would have just flagged myself as more interested in my personal entertainment than in helping with what I knew was the whole office's biggest annual thing. And I seriously doubt I would still be there now, about seven years later, if I had asked. Nah, I probably wouldn't have been fired on the spot. Just phased out as soon as it could be done smoothly.

Winterlight

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #33 on: December 10, 2012, 11:30:22 AM »
If I were the employer in question here, and I'd already told a new hire that they would have to work during the holidays, and that new employee proceeded to ask for time off anyway, I wouldn't think that employee was very serious about her job.

This. I would also consider whether this person is someone I'd want for a full-time job.
If wisdom’s ways you wisely seek,
Five things observe with care,
To whom you speak,
Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
Caroline Lake Ingalls

Isisnin

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #34 on: December 10, 2012, 11:50:03 AM »
I figure it never hurts to make the request as long as you do so according to company guidelines (i.e. asking early enough) and as long as you are okay with being told "no."

I disagree as the manager already asked her to work and she's basically on probation and hoping the temp position becomes permanent.  Sometimes the asking does hurt.  It gives the impression that your job is not your priority as you asked for time off knowing that your presence has been requested/is needed.  Definitely wouldn't ask in this scenario.

Agreed, there are times where it most certainly does hurt to ask, and this is one of them.

Yup, this. Some years ago I had to pass up the chance to go on a fun trip with friends because it was right at our office's busiest time (not the Christmas holiday in our case, but an annual spring event). One friend nagged me continually that it couldn't hurt to ask, and I argued that it would absolutely hurt to ask. No matter whether the answer was yes or no, I would have just flagged myself as more interested in my personal entertainment than in helping with what I knew was the whole office's biggest annual thing. And I seriously doubt I would still be there now, about seven years later, if I had asked. Nah, I probably wouldn't have been fired on the spot. Just phased out as soon as it could be done smoothly.

This!  I was going to post exactly this from a manger point of view.  A manager will remember an employee who ask for time off under these circumstances as unreliable and the next in line to let go.  Certainly not to be hired (since in this case, it's a temp job).

Also, should a person ask for time off under these circumstances, that person should not use the manager as a reference in the future.  Asking about reliability is a very common question when checking references. 

nuit93

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #35 on: December 10, 2012, 12:03:04 PM »
Honestly, I wouldn't even ask. 

Just asking will probably put you in a bad light with your boss, which is a bad idea if you want to stay there.

StuffedGrapeLeaves

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #36 on: December 10, 2012, 12:38:48 PM »
CreteGirl, now I'm curious.  Are you the employee or the supervisor? 

Sharnita

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #37 on: December 10, 2012, 12:45:30 PM »
I think this is an obvious case where asking can hurt. 

darling

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #38 on: December 10, 2012, 03:57:28 PM »
If you were fairly new to a position, would you ask for time off after your supervisor requested that you work over the holidays? 

For this example, let's say your friends asked that you accompany them on a trip that you would really enjoy. 

Your supervisor only recently asked that you work, and you were already contemplating going on the trip, but had not made firm plans or requested time off. 

Your supervisor asked you to work days that are not part of  your normal schedule over the holidays, however some of the days you want off are days you do typically work.

Would you still go if your supervisor told you it was a problem, but did not deny your request?

How would you feel if your request was denied and you had already made vacation plans?

Some information about the position:

It is a part time, but well paid position. 

It is a temporary position with a possibility of becoming a full time permanent position.

It is not retail or holiday driven

It is in a field you would like as a career

There is no one available to cover your position while you are gone, since others asked for time off first 

There are currently no paid vacation days, but that will change in 2013

I wouldn't ask for time off. It's pretty clear from the info that it would be a terrible idea to even ask.

CreteGirl

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays - Update on Page 3
« Reply #39 on: December 10, 2012, 09:01:10 PM »
CreteGirl, now I'm curious.  Are you the employee or the supervisor?

I am the supervisor of the soon to be ex-employee.  I tried to word my question neutrally to get unbiased answers, but I understand why most would assume I was the employee. 

My main question:  "would you even ask?", was answered with a resounding no.  I was curious if the fact that the position is part time and temporary would make anyone more likely to ask for or expect the time off.

The employee in question has been a stellar employee up until this point, although he is still learning the position basics. 

I asked him to reschedule his vacation, and he told me it was not possible.  I told him this jeopardizes his chances for advancement and even continued employment, to which he had no response.

What he has thrown away is an opportunity that could, after a number of years, turn from an entry level position into a six figure income.   He has lost the opportunity to be mentored by someone who has the position he said he someday hopes to achieve.

I'm astounded at how easily he has thrown away an opportunity for career mentoring and advancement within an industry leading company. 

Amava

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays - Update on Page 3
« Reply #40 on: December 10, 2012, 09:09:19 PM »
CreteGirl, now I'm curious.  Are you the employee or the supervisor?

I am the supervisor of the soon to be ex-employee.  I tried to word my question neutrally to get unbiased answers, but I understand why most would assume I was the employee. 

My main question:  "would you even ask?", was answered with a resounding no.  I was curious if the fact that the position is part time and temporary would make anyone more likely to ask for or expect the time off.

The employee in question has been a stellar employee up until this point, although he is still learning the position basics. 

I asked him to reschedule his vacation, and he told me it was not possible.  I told him this jeopardizes his chances for advancement and even continued employment, to which he had no response.

What he has thrown away is an opportunity that could, after a number of years, turn from an entry level position into a six figure income.   He has lost the opportunity to be mentored by someone who has the position he said he someday hopes to achieve.

I'm astounded at how easily he has thrown away an opportunity for career mentoring and advancement within an industry leading company.

Can I have his job?  >:D I promise I'll be more reliable than he showed himself to be.  ;D

Just kidding - but if you were wondering whether you were in your right to be annoyed at him even just asking, well, I would say yes you are.
You /could/ perhaps have told him: "No" instead of just /asking/ him to reschedule his vacation, but then again, you did explain the consequences.
It's odd. He must just not have cared as much about the job, the field and the opportunities as you would have expected him to.

I hope the next one who fills the position will be a better match!

kareng57

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays - Update on Page 3
« Reply #41 on: December 10, 2012, 11:11:00 PM »
CreteGirl, now I'm curious.  Are you the employee or the supervisor?

I am the supervisor of the soon to be ex-employee.  I tried to word my question neutrally to get unbiased answers, but I understand why most would assume I was the employee. 

My main question:  "would you even ask?", was answered with a resounding no.  I was curious if the fact that the position is part time and temporary would make anyone more likely to ask for or expect the time off.

The employee in question has been a stellar employee up until this point, although he is still learning the position basics. 

I asked him to reschedule his vacation, and he told me it was not possible.  I told him this jeopardizes his chances for advancement and even continued employment, to which he had no response.

What he has thrown away is an opportunity that could, after a number of years, turn from an entry level position into a six figure income.   He has lost the opportunity to be mentored by someone who has the position he said he someday hopes to achieve.

I'm astounded at how easily he has thrown away an opportunity for career mentoring and advancement within an industry leading company.


I'd be astounded too - but, he's learned a hard lesson.  And it's better that it came from you, rather than if you'd caved-in, and he'd have expected his supervisor at the next job to do the same.

SoCalVal

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays - Update on Page 3
« Reply #42 on: December 10, 2012, 11:56:55 PM »
CreteGirl, now I'm curious.  Are you the employee or the supervisor?

I am the supervisor of the soon to be ex-employee.  I tried to word my question neutrally to get unbiased answers, but I understand why most would assume I was the employee. 

My main question:  "would you even ask?", was answered with a resounding no.  I was curious if the fact that the position is part time and temporary would make anyone more likely to ask for or expect the time off.

The employee in question has been a stellar employee up until this point, although he is still learning the position basics. 

I asked him to reschedule his vacation, and he told me it was not possible.  I told him this jeopardizes his chances for advancement and even continued employment, to which he had no response.

What he has thrown away is an opportunity that could, after a number of years, turn from an entry level position into a six figure income.   He has lost the opportunity to be mentored by someone who has the position he said he someday hopes to achieve.

I'm astounded at how easily he has thrown away an opportunity for career mentoring and advancement within an industry leading company.


I'd be astounded too - but, he's learned a hard lesson.  And it's better that it came from you, rather than if you'd caved-in, and he'd have expected his supervisor at the next job to do the same.

I'm concluding that because he's been a stellar employee so far, he thinks he has leverage for requesting time off at a time that is unreasonable and doesn't think he'll have difficulty resuming his career path elsewhere.  Really, if he's been stellar, I'd conclude he'd still get a good reference, but his future with the OP's company is done, so it seems (and I don't think he has considered how word may travel).  We have an employee who has well burned her bridges in the field she wishes to pursue, which changes rapidly, so she's now too many years out of school to get the post-graduate training required for her field (we have no idea what she's going to do about that four years of super-expensive education that's losing its usefulness for her with each year that passes, and it's been 5-6 years already).  The way she still acts, it appears she still doesn't get how badly she damaged her future in that field.



sourwolf

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays - Update on Page 3
« Reply #43 on: December 11, 2012, 12:03:24 AM »
CreteGirl, now I'm curious.  Are you the employee or the supervisor?

I am the supervisor of the soon to be ex-employee.  I tried to word my question neutrally to get unbiased answers, but I understand why most would assume I was the employee. 

My main question:  "would you even ask?", was answered with a resounding no.  I was curious if the fact that the position is part time and temporary would make anyone more likely to ask for or expect the time off.

The employee in question has been a stellar employee up until this point, although he is still learning the position basics. 

I asked him to reschedule his vacation, and he told me it was not possible.  I told him this jeopardizes his chances for advancement and even continued employment, to which he had no response.

What he has thrown away is an opportunity that could, after a number of years, turn from an entry level position into a six figure income.   He has lost the opportunity to be mentored by someone who has the position he said he someday hopes to achieve.

I'm astounded at how easily he has thrown away an opportunity for career mentoring and advancement within an industry leading company.
So not only did he ask but he wasn't wiling to accept "no" for an answer?  Wow, just wow.

Amara

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #44 on: December 11, 2012, 12:46:31 AM »
I suspect he has yet to realize the cost of his choice. He is not an ex-employee yet, but a soon-to-be one. Furthermore, I think it will take him many years before he fully realizes the cost to himself (that the OP so clearly laid out in her most recent post). Picture him at age 40 looking back at this decision. I see a flood of regret.